What Trump’s education budget proposal means for students and …

President Donald Trump’s education budget could chop $9.2 billion from programs that promote early learning, arts education, college work-study, and access to federal education grants and loans, pending congressional approval.

The proposed legislation aims to increase school choice by expanding charter school and voucher funding by $400 million and pours $1 billion into an incentive grant program for school districts that allow school choice – a priority investment in a plan championed by President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. The budget proposal, which was released May 23 and would result in a 13.5% decrease in Department of Education funding, was first reported by The Washington Post.

But with cuts to federal financial aid programs like the Perkins loans and Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), federal work-study, and after-school care, many feel as if the new budget is anything but an investment in the future.

“This budget is grossly out of step with the needs of young people and the priorities of most members of Congress,” says Reid Setzer, director of government affairs for the nationwide young adult education and advocacy group, Young Invincibles. “It fails to invest in young people and the future of our country by slashing opportunities for young adults to gain skills through education, sustain themselves and their families, and contribute to our workforce.”

The end of Public Service Loan Forgiveness?

While the budget is expected to be revised as it moves through Congress, the suggested cuts and restructured student loan repayment plans are frightening to low-income families and students who have planned their economic and educational futures on government assistance.

Take the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, for example: After 10 years of monthly payments while working in public service or for a nonprofit, remaining student debt will disappear. The proposed budget would end the program, cutting $859 million.

Fortunately, borrowers who are already enrolled in PSLF will be grandfathered in, meaning they will still be eligible for loan forgiveness even after the program ends. The changes would apply to loans that originated after July 1, 2018.

Amanda Aubrey, a staff attorney at Legal Action of Wisconsin, is relying on the government-promised freedom from thousands of dollars of debt. Aubrey, 38, says she planned her career around eligibility and calls the sudden uncertainty of that relief the “bait-and-switch of a lifetime.” She graduated from the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law in 2013.

“Without it, it’s unlikely I will ever be able to own my own home, or even discharge more than half the debt on my own,” says Aubrey. “My retirement will likely get pushed back until I’m 75, because the money I might otherwise have saved would have been required for loan repayment.”

While he recognizes that the Trump administration has suggested a system of grandfathering for current PSLF enrollees, Setzer says it’s not guaranteed, and even if it was, the incentive for individuals seeking public servant jobs could vanish with the dismantling of the program.

Aubrey says the potential diminishing number of public servants also could mean an alarming lack of services for those who need them most.

“Having the PSLF as an option made it possible to follow the path I wanted to follow, rather than having to pursue a path that would make enough money to pay back the loans,” Aubrey says. “Low-income clients desperately need legal representation, and low-paying jobs for attorneys are usually the only prayer such clients have at getting the help they need. Eliminating the PSLF takes away that possibility, for legal, medical, and many other professionals.”

What it means for families

The budget’s impacts could be felt far earlier than college and professional careers. Government-funded after-school care is in jeopardy in the proposed budget.

The plan proposes cutting $1.2 billion from government-funded after-school and summer programs.

“(Lack of after-school care) would put a strain on the family, as far as the wife and myself having to rush home to make sure the kids are taken care of,” says Robert Chatmon, a father of three in Athens, Ga. “If they’re at after-school, you have trained people who are there that are willing to look after them, take care of them – give them that extra support that they need.”

The fear of losing funding for after-school care looms large, as the budget’s targeted programs primarily assist poor families.

“You end up hurting people who depend on the very program you’re cutting,” Chatmon says.

What programs are being cut

Here are some key suggested cuts in the proposed education budget:

●     $2.3 billion from programs that provide teacher training and class-size reduction

●     $1.2 billion from government-funded after-school and summer programs

●     $1 billion from federal loans for disadvantaged students, including Perkins loans

●     $490 million – 50% – from federal work-study programs

In addition, no money would be allocated for certain grants that help to fund mental health services, anti-bullying campaigns, advanced placement, and physical education courses.

What’s next

The president’s May 23 budget proposal is one step of five in signing the budget for the next fiscal year – beginning Oct. 1 – into law.

The next step – congressional review and resolution – requires the House and Senate budget committees to decide and vote on spending limits for the overall budget.

Then the appropriations committees in the House and Senate will allocate exact funding for all discretionary programs.

The House and Senate will then debate and vote on the changes made to funding requests for each of the appropriations committees.

The president must then sign into law each of the 12 appropriation bills in the 2018 budget as they are approved by Congress.

While the Trump administration has requested large and far-reaching cuts to federal education spending, the specific dollar amounts are likely to change, and it is possible that some of the proposed reductions and expansions will not pass through Congress by the October deadline. 

MagnifyMoney is a price comparison and financial education website, founded by former bankers who use their knowledge of how the system works to help you save money.

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UCSB Ranked 2nd Amongst ‘Top Colleges Doing the Most for the American Dream’

UC Santa Barbara ranks second-best in the nation amongst universities “committed to economic diversity,” according to a New York Times college ranking released Thursday.

The New York Times arrived at the ranking by factoring in the number of lower-income and middle-income students that a university enrolls alongside the amount that those students pay to attend. Universities that enroll more lower and middle-income students at a lower price received the highest ranking.

UC campuses dominated the top portion of the list. UC Irvine received the highest ranking and UCSB followed after it.

UC Davis, UC San Diego and UCLA ranked third, fourth and fifth, respectively. UC Berkeley ranked ninth.

Nearly 40 percent of UCSB’s freshman class — made up of approximately 4,600 students — is receiving the Pell Grant, which the federal government awards to students from the lower half of the economic demographic.

The New York Times also reported that, with an average price of $13,000 for middle-income students, UCSB endows an average of $7,100 to each student.

The New York Times accompanied its college ranking with an op-ed piece by columnist David Leonhardt. He claims that many public universities have been enrolling less lower-to-middle-income student as a result of decreased state funding.

Public universities have been increasingly “replacing” these students with “affluent students who can afford the tuition,” Leonhardt says.

Leonhardt adds that the biggest declines in economic diversity have been amongst UC campuses, which have historically ranked at the top of The New York Times’ college ranking for the past three years.

Rather than replacing poor students, Leonhardt says, the UC has been enrolling the same number of lower-income students while increasing its enrollment of higher-income students. UC campuses have experienced “severe overcrowding” as a result, he says.

Goose Creek CISD Education Foundation patrol awards grants …

With the spirit and noise of a holiday parade, the Goose Creek CISD Education Foundation marched down the halls of district schools two mornings in April to award 77 grants to deserving educators to enhance classroom instruction. Accompanied by Robert E. Lee High School drum line members; REL, Goose Creek Memorial High School and Ross S. Sterling High School cheerleaders as well as some REL Celebrities, Education Foundation members and district administrators boarded yellow school buses carrying large checks to present to grant winners. 

Since the inception of the Goose Creek CISD Education Foundation in 2009, the organization has awarded more than $830,000 to teachers searching for ways to fund innovative ideas to benefit their students. Thanks to generous donors in the community as well as GCCISD staff members, who donate through the payroll deduction program, this marked the eighth year the Grant Surprise Patrol has delivered these grants. 

“Our teachers are creative in their methods and strategies, and it is often difficult for them to obtain the necessary resources to enhance their students’ educational experiences,” said Randal O’Brien, Goose Creek CISD superintendent. “That’s why we at Goose Creek CISD appreciate the Education Foundation so much. The Goose Creek CISD Education Foundation believes that schools are critical to the success of a community, and its members have committed to giving time and effort to funding creative educational programs in our district.” 

Janet Sennet, a teacher at Highlands Elementary, was pleased to see the group stop at her classroom to present her with $500 for her grant “The Big Bank” to enhance financial literacy. She will use the money to construct a bank and a store, and students will select a career.

“They will earn a bi-weekly salary, make a household budget and save 10 percent of their earnings. Also, students will be able to buy goods from the store,” said Sennet. “They will select a charity to which they will donate. Students will operate the Big Bank just like a real financial institution. I will provide them with checks, debit/credit cards and money. The students will be required to borrow money from the bank to understand how interest works.”

To enrich the science curriculum at Horace Mann Junior School, Susan Dagley submitted her grant “KABOOM! Chemistry Demos” in the amount of $1,270. The funds she received from the Goose Creek CISD Education Foundation will allow the Outreach program from The Museum of Natural Science to demonstrate chemical reactions for the entire student body.

“One of our science campus goals is to incorporate more hands-on activities during science class. Students would witness demonstrations of combustion, color changes, polymers and watching incredible effects of liquid nitrogen. These are demonstrations that we normally are unable to do due to lack of resources,” Dagley said. 

Another happy grant winner was Kathryn Aguilar from IMPACT Early College High School, who received a $2,000 grant for materials for her forensics class. 

“Without the grant, we couldn’t do everything we want to do in the class. It takes materials to make an interesting forensics class. We will look for trace evidence, set up crime scenes and do more with serology,” said Aguilar. “We send real DNA samples to a National Geographic program, and students present the results of the analysis of their own DNA.”

The grants are awarded to teachers at all different levels for various subjects and for a diverse range of projects. Some teachers, like Linda LeDay at Dr. Antonio Bañuelos Elementary, have found that if they have creative ideas, they can receive more than one grant, but only one per year.

“Knowing that these innovative teaching grants are at work in Goose Creek CISD classrooms every day is so rewarding,” said Kathy Clausen, president of the Education Foundation. “The Education Foundation is extremely grateful to our donors for making this possible.”

The mission of the Goose Creek CISD Education foundation is to partner with the community to provide resources to enrich teaching, inspire learning and provide opportunities for excellence in education for all students in the Goose Creek Consolidated Independent School District. Goals include involving the community in assuring a quality education for the leaders and workers of tomorrow, supporting staff for innovative efforts, recognizing staff for exemplary teaching and encouraging all students to work at their highest potential. 

If you would like to donate to the GCCISD Education Foundation, please go online to gccisd.net or call 281-707-3629.

The top 10 colleges in Michigan

Olds Hall on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing. (Photo: Dave Wasinger, Lansing State Journal)

Michigan is home to many colleges that provide students with a quality education Whether you’re looking for a large university or small college, you will be able to find it in Michigan.

Looking outside of Michigan? You can find the best college in your chosen state by visiting this page. College Factual’s ranking methodology is highly focused on data related to outcomes, such as loan default rates, graduation rates and average starting salaries of graduates. You can read more about their methodology here. Below is a ranking of the top 10 schools — out of 38 total — in Michigan.

1. University of Michigan

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan is one of the oldest public universities in the country. Michigan has 19 schools and colleges that offer over 250 degree programs, including one of the best engineering and foreign language and linguistics programs in the country. In addition to numerous academic offerings, Michigan provides students with various on-campus clubs and organizations along with events to help create a community feel. Michigan is one of the best values for your money due to the strength of its programs and low net cost.

2. Michigan State University

Michigan State University (MSU) is a public university located in East Lansing. Established in 1855, the school is known for its dedication to academic excellence. The school offers more than 200 programs, many of which are among the best in the country. In addition to exceptional academics, MSU has over 600 clubs and organizations for students to join. Students at MSU have the opportunity to work alongside professors performing research and gaining hands-on experience in their field. With 19 colleges on the campus, students are sure to find a major that is right for them at MSU.

3. Albion College

Albion College is a liberal arts college located in the small town of Albion. The intimate class sizes are taught by mostly full-time teachers and help foster professional relationships between students and professors. A large part of being a member of the Albion community includes volunteering and spending time off campus. These opportunities, coupled with the extensive research projects available to undergraduates, help develop well-rounded students. The school has a high percentage of on-time graduations along with a good earnings boost that makes Albion an excellent choice for any student.

4. Calvin College

Calvin College is a liberal arts school with strong Christian roots. Calvin creates a community environment for students and encourages collaboration, service-learning and international study. With more than 100 degree programs, students can rest assured this school has the program for them. Students enjoy their time at this college because they are given the opportunity to experience hands-on learning to ensure they are prepared to enter the work force after graduation. With a 13:1 student to faculty ratio, impressive graduation rate and low net cost, Calvin College is a smart choice for any student wishing to study in Michigan.

5. Kalamazoo College

Founded in 1833, Kalamazoo College is one of the oldest schools in the country. The private liberal arts school has a high percentage of full time teachers, many of who have the highest possible degree in their field. Kalamazoo offers a unique academic experience known as the K-Plan, which is made up of a strong liberal arts education, experience learning, international and intercultural experience and independent scholarship. This innovative approach to higher education helps prepare students for future success by providing a focused and dynamic curriculum. Kalamazoo College is a great choice for any student looking for a fundamental liberal arts education.

6. Michigan Technological University

Michigan Technological University is a public research school dedicated to providing a science and technology education. With the engineering program ranked as one of the best in the country, students at Michigan Tech are sure to receive a well-rounded education that sets them up for success after graduation. Along with classroom learning, Michigan Tech students have the ability to participate in the school’s Enterprise Program, which provides hands-on experience as students work directly with outside businesses and corporations to solve real-world problems. Co-ops, internships and study abroad options provide other opportunities for students to supplement what they learn in classes and get their foot in the door at possible employers before they even graduate. A degree from Michigan Tech provides students with a good earnings boost as they enter the job force.

7. Hope College

Hope College is a private four-year institution with a strong Christian tradition. The school offers 91 programs that give the diverse student body the ability to study in the field they are passionate about. Small class sizes facilitate productive discussions and the ability for students to think on a global scale. Hope College is a “great value for your money” school and gives students the education necessary to be leaders after graduation.

8. Kettering University

Founded in 1919, Kettering University is a small, private school that combines classroom learning with hands-on practice to help prepare students for jobs after graduation. Kettering is focused on offering a STEM education that gives students a strong background in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics while also incorporating business and humanities courses. With 14 undergraduate majors and numerous concentrations, students can find the specialized area they are interested in. If you are looking for a good education with opportunities for practical experience, Kettering might be for you.

9. University of Detroit Mercy

The University of Detroit Mercy is a mid-size, private university dedicated to helping students reach their potential. As a Catholic university, the university has a strong connection to Jesuit and Mercy values. The mission of the school is to develop leaders with a strong moral compass that can better their communities after graduation. The most popular majors at the school are within in the health professions and include nursing, public health, and dental support services. The University of Detroit Mercy is a community-based school with a strong track record of providing students with a top education.

10. Andrews University

Founded in 1874, Andrews was the first institution of higher education started by Seventh-day Adventists. The university offers 130 programs and degrees in addition to encouraging community service and spiritual growth. The population at Andrews is relatively small with less than 2,000 students. This, along with an excellent student to faculty ratio, makes Andrews a great place to get individual mentoring from staff and upper classmen.

This article comes from The USA TODAY College partner network. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of USA TODAY. You understand that we have no obligation to monitor any discussion forums, blogs, photo- or video-sharing pages, or other areas of the Site through which users can supply information or material. However, we reserve the right at all times, in our sole discretion, to screen content submitted by users and to edit, move, delete, and/or refuse to accept any content that in our judgment violates these Terms of Service or is otherwise unacceptable or inappropriate, whether for legal or other reasons.

Secretary DeVos Announces Reconsideration of Upward Bound Applications

Today, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced the Department will read and score applications for the Upward Bound grant program that were deemed ineligible under technical formatting rules issued by the previous Administration. The flexibility to consider these applications was made possible by the 2017 Omnibus spending bill.

After announcing the change at today’s House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education hearing, Secretary DeVos issued the following statement:

“With the 2017 Omnibus spending bill, Congress provided us with the flexibility to review all of the applications previously deemed ineligible due to technical formatting requirements. Going forward, I have directed all Department staff to allow flexibility on formatting and other technical elements on all grant applications. Bureaucratic red tape should never get in the way of helping students.”

Top Colleges Doing the Most for the American Dream – The New …

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Northside Neighborhood House Receives $7,000 Grant To Support …

This week, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation awarded Northside Neighborhood House a $7,000 grant to support adult literacy and education.  This local grant award is part of more than $7.5 million in grants awarded to nearly 900 schools, nonprofits and organizations across the 44 states that Dollar General serves.

“We are thrilled to receive funding from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation to support our Adult Education Program, “ said Brianne Lalor, chief development officer for the Northside Neighborhood House. “We started this program in 2007 because many of our clients were in need of Adult Education and wanted to have access to more opportunities by earning their high school equivalency degree. We have seen many lives transformed through this program.”  

Students meet three days a week at the NNH main office and benefit from one on one tutoring from the adult education director and faithful volunteers (including retired educators and current education majors). Through the program, students can also access practice materials online in case they can’t make it in for class in person.  The NNH partners with Tennessee College of Applied Technology to deliver programming.   

“Dollar General is excited to provide these organizations with funding to support literacy and education throughout the 44 states we serve,” said Todd Vasos, Dollar General’s CEO.  “Providing these grants and supporting the communities we call home reflects our mission of Serving Others and it’s rewarding to see the impact these funds have.” 

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation supports initiatives that help others improve their lives through literacy and education. Since its inception in 1993, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation has awarded more than $135 million in grants to nonprofit organizations; helping more than 8.6 million individuals take their first steps toward literacy or continued education. 

Northside Neighborhood House Receives $7,000 Grant To Support …

This week, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation awarded Northside Neighborhood House a $7,000 grant to support adult literacy and education.  This local grant award is part of more than $7.5 million in grants awarded to nearly 900 schools, nonprofits and organizations across the 44 states that Dollar General serves.

“We are thrilled to receive funding from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation to support our Adult Education Program, “ said Brianne Lalor, chief development officer for the Northside Neighborhood House. “We started this program in 2007 because many of our clients were in need of Adult Education and wanted to have access to more opportunities by earning their high school equivalency degree. We have seen many lives transformed through this program.”  

Students meet three days a week at the NNH main office and benefit from one on one tutoring from the adult education director and faithful volunteers (including retired educators and current education majors). Through the program, students can also access practice materials online in case they can’t make it in for class in person.  The NNH partners with Tennessee College of Applied Technology to deliver programming.   

“Dollar General is excited to provide these organizations with funding to support literacy and education throughout the 44 states we serve,” said Todd Vasos, Dollar General’s CEO.  “Providing these grants and supporting the communities we call home reflects our mission of Serving Others and it’s rewarding to see the impact these funds have.” 

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation supports initiatives that help others improve their lives through literacy and education. Since its inception in 1993, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation has awarded more than $135 million in grants to nonprofit organizations; helping more than 8.6 million individuals take their first steps toward literacy or continued education. 

Who are the top-10 high school football recruits in The Herald’s coverage area?

High school football coaches from The Herald’s coverage area have busily hosted college coaches all spring, and for good reason.

Our area is loaded with future college football players, young men that are doing their thing on Friday nights. The Herald’s Bret McCormick spent the past few months compiling a list of players that have college football potential, and in some cases, already hold scholarship offers.

Important to keep in mind while reading this: academics is not included or mentioned in any of these profiles, but none of these guys will play Division I college football without at least a 2.3 grade point average in their core classes. Additionally, college prospects in any sport will need to pass 10 core classes by the start of their seventh semester, meaning college hopefuls can’t wait until their senior year to cram in all the important classes they’re lacking.

Learn more about college eligibility at the NCAA Clearinghouse web site and check out the top-10 recruits in our area (plus 20 more), illustrated by Rock Hill’s Garrison Gist:

1. Derion Kendrick, South Pointe

As explosive an athlete as has come through the Rock Hill area in five or six years, Kendrick has the ability to go all the way to the top. He could play either defensive back or receiver at the next level; it appears Clemson wants to use him on offense.

He threw for 3,348 yards and 37 touchdowns and also ran for 630 yards and eight touchdowns last season, while earning All-Area player of the year honors. He was also named Region 3-4A player of the year, Big 22 player of the year by WSOC-TV, the Tri-County Coaches Association 4A/5A offensive player of the year and junior class All-American, by MaxPreps.

Six-foot-1, 200 pounds, Kendrick weaves through opposing defenses almost effortlessly and he’ll be the biggest reason why South Pointe will be the favorite to win a fourth straight state title this coming season.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Kendrick committed to Clemson in late January.

Play(s) that defined his season: South Pointe in a dogfight with Belton-Honea Path in the second round of the 2016 playoffs. After a scoreless first half coach, Strait Herron pulled Kendrick aside and told him to relax and just play the Stallions’ style of football. By the end of the third quarter, South Pointe had jumped out to a four touchdown lead – three of them were passes from Kendrick.

Coach said it:

2. Josh Belk, Lewisville

Six-foot-4, 300-pound defensive tackle largely staved off serious injury problems last season to record 78 tackles, including 23 for a loss, and seven sacks. Belk committed to Clemson in late January and the limelight will be even more focused on him this fall as a senior. Lewisville coach Will Mitchell said he wanted to see his star player complete a full season without injury and also continue to emerge as a leader in the program. But even if Belk is still developing his consistency, the potential is obvious. His innate strength is obvious – he can squat nearly 600 pounds – but college coaches love the details, including his flexibility and agility for someone his size.

Scholarship offers/commitment: committed to Clemson

Play(s) that defined his season: Sure, Belk’s power is impossible to miss, especially against 1A competition. But against Eau Claire – and nearly every other team he faced last season – Belk showed where much of the power comes from: his hands. The pop from the two hands together into an opposing player’s chest keeps them on their heels and will be invaluable when Belk begins facing people his own size at Clemson.

Coach said it:

3. Jamario Holley, Northwestern

Holley’s production dipped during an injury-dinged sophomore year but he may be the closest in the area to moving as smoothly as Kendrick. The 5-foot-11, 170-pound receiver caught 34 passes for 409 yards and three touchdowns in nine games, and also averaged nearly 29 yards per kick return. He’s one of the best prospects in the area because of his elite athletic fluidity and shiftiness with the football.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, Kentucky, Florida State and Tennessee (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: The 68-yard screen pass Holley took for a touchdown against South Pointe underlined his immense potential. It’s not often that a player can make South Pointe defenders look normal, speed-wise, but Holley did just that on an eye-opening TD catch and run. The only negative? The play was called back for offensive holding.

Coach said it:

4. Eli Adams, South Pointe

When Eli Adams was a sophomore, Coach Herron knew he had a game-changing player. His speedy jump off the ball makes him extremely difficult to block, and Herron compares his quickness at the snap to Jadeveon Clowney. The 6-foot, 230-pound offensive nightmare could use a few more inches in height and wingspan, but still dominates the high school competition. He’s getting recruited to play linebacker in college, and has offers from the likes of South Carolina, Maryland, and N.C. State. Adams had 95 tackles, 17 tackles-for-loss and 10 sacks last fall as a junior.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, N.C. State, Charlotte, Old Dominion, UMass, Virginia Tech, Kansas State, Maryland and East Carolina (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: Sometimes it’s like Adams is jumping off a diving board and everyone else is jumping from the pool deck. The tackle-for-loss and strip he produced against Hartsville in the 4A state championship game led to Jalen Pickett-Hicks scooping and scoring to put the game to rest. It was indicative of the explosion Adams demonstrated regularly the last two seasons.

Coach said it:

5. Quay Hardin, Chester

At 6-foot-2, 175 pounds, Hardin is built like the prototypical modern defensive back. He was one of the top ball-hawking cornerbacks in the state last fall when he made nine interceptions and broke up 10 more passes. He had 60 tackles and also was effective as a part-time receiver, catching four TD passes.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Eastern Michigan (offer); SEC, ACC interest

Play(s) that defined his season: Hardin picked off two passes in the Cyclones’ win over Lancaster, including one that clinched the victory. The first one, though, showed off Hardin’s range and length. He got underneath a pretty well thrown ball by Bruins QB Jamias Shropshire down the right sideline but stretched to pull in the pass intended for Lancaster receiver Desmond Stowers.

Coach said it:

6. Steven Gilmore Jr., South Pointe

Gilmore pulled in 31 passes for 422 yards and five touchdowns last season, with three of those coming in the second quarter of South Pointe’s state championship win last December. He also returned a kickoff for another score. Five-foot-11 and 160 pounds, Gilmore Jr. clearly needs to bulk up but he has shiftiness similar to his older brother, South Pointe NFL product Stephon Gilmore. South Pointe coach Strait Herron said Gilmore Jr. has put too much pressure on himself at times, but that he’s dealing better with the attention his last name attracts. Since his state championship performance, Gilmore Jr. has pulled multiple FBS scholarship offers and also won the 4A long jump state championship.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, East Carolina, Georgia, Duke and Kansas State (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: In last year’s 4A State Championship, Gilmore Jr. took a screen pass out of the left flat and wiggled through defenders en route to a 54-yard touchdown. He amassed 135 yards and 3 touchdowns in that game, with South Carolina head coach Will Muschamp standing on the sideline of Williams-Brice Stadium.

Coach said it:

7. Markees Watts, Lancaster

The explosive 6-foot-2, 205-pound junior defensive end recorded 30 tackles-for-loss, 17 sacks and was named the Tri-County Coaches Association’s 4A/5A defensive player of the year last fall. Watts also broke up eight passes last season and has 47 tackles for negative yardage in the last two seasons combined. He’s played with his hand in the dirt in high school but projects as a college linebacker and could use some more experience playing in open space but his explosive fluidity and athleticism should make the transition painless.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Wofford, Charlotte, Charleston Southern, Middle Tennessee State, Mercer, Troy, South Carolina State, James Madison and Appalachian State (offer); Georgia State, N.C. State, Wake Forest, Miami (OH), Furman interest

Play(s) that defined his season: A bewildered voice says “he took the ball away from him!” midway through a clip showing Watts sacking York’s quarterback and then scooping up the fumble and returning it for a touchdown.

Coach said it:

8. Travell Crosby, Nation Ford

Crosby began to show his potential last season with 55 tackles and regular playing time at defensive tackle. Crosby’s size – 6-foot-8, 310 pounds – means he’ll be on college radars for the next year and the plan is to move him to offensive line this fall. The Queens, N.Y. native will initially play at guard where he can get his hands on defensive linemen immediately while his skills catch up to his hulking frame. Falcons coach Michael Allen said the spring and summer will be key for Crosby, who has plans to attend camps at Clemson, Coastal Carolina and probably N.C. State and South Carolina.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Clemson, Coastal Carolina, South Carolina, N.C. State interest

Play(s) that defined his season: Crosby had an obvious size advantage against any blockers he faced last fall, but not only was he driving back Northwestern offensive linemen in this clip, but watch how he cast them off to wrap up Trojan ball-carrier Jerry Howard, an ACC recruit. If Crosby can continue to develop his technical abilities, watch out.

Coach said it:

9. Pha’Leak Brown, Chester

Chester coach Victor Floyd said fans will see Brown exclusively at running back much more often this fall. He’s played there and in the secondary for Chester with success at both positions the last two years. Brown was a MaxPreps All-American as a freshman and rushed for 607 yards and 10 touchdowns last season, in addition to 44 tackles and four interceptions in defensive back duties. Five-foot-11, 180 pounds, Brown has a great body, good vision, and is elusive and really strong, especially from the waist down. Floyd said his sophomore standout is a blue collar worker in the weight room and it shows.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, Clemson, UNC, N.C. State and many others interested

Play(s) that defined his season: Watch the stutter-step as Brown cuts back into the running lane in this clip. Brown shows off the vision and the wheels that will make him an FBS recruit at running back.

Coach said it:

10. Quentin Sanders, Lewisville

Sanders should be in line for a big role in Lewisville’s offense this fall with QB Trey Keels graduating but the 5-foot-11, 190-pound running back got a crash course playing some Wildcat QB last season. He rushed for 1,175 yards and 15 TDs, and also caught 37 passes in the Lions’ spread offense for 516 yards and another four scores. Sanders could play defensive back or running back in college; Lewisville coach Will Mitchell said Marshall offered Sanders as the latter. He’s done heavy work in the weight room and has extremely long arms, which especially interests the colleges viewing the Lion standout as a cornerback.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Marshall (offer); N.C. State, Miami (Ohio) interest

Play(s) that defined his season: the first play of Sanders’ Hudl highlight from Lewisville’s loss to Lancaster two years ago is indicative of the aggression that he plays with, something Mitchell – and the college coaches visiting Richburg – love to see. Sanders was playing defensive back in the clip but he plays the same way in the offensive backfield, never going down at first contact and always finishing runs with a lowered shoulder.

Coach said it:

Ten more

(In alphabetical order)

Antonio Barber, Rock Hill – the 6-foot-2, 184-pound freshman receiver has all the physical tools to be a college football player and should be a key piece on offense for the Bearcats this coming season.

K.D. Canaty, Northwestern – former defensive lineman made a successful switch to the o-line where he graded 83 percent with seven knockdowns for the Trojans. Canaty is getting plenty of college interest.

Jamari Currence, South Pointe – defensive back intercepted seven passes and made 67 tackles during a strong junior year for the Stallions. Currence has multiple FCS offers – UMass, The Citadel, Charleston Southern, Eastern Kentucky – and easily could have slotted into the top-10 list.

B.J. Davis, South Pointe – A bit of a late bloomer because of his basketball career, Davis had a really good fall, notching 80 tackles, intercepting four passes, forcing two fumbles and recovering two more from his hybrid linebacker-safety position. The 6-foot-4 athlete could see extensive time at receiver this coming season, and has offers from Northern Iowa and S.C. State.

Mikial Fourney, Lewisville – Fourney has started every game in his three years of high school football and college coaches are intrigued by his size – 6-foot-2, 180 pounds – in the secondary. Lions coach Will Mitchell expects his rising senior to have FBS offers by the end of the summer.

Garrett Lutz, Clover – powerful and intelligent center graded 92 percent for Clover last season, recording 50 knockdown blocks and earning first team All-Area honors. He’s getting recruiting interest from Wake Forest, Furman and North Greenville.

Jaylen Mahoney, South Pointe – sophomore cornerback Mahoney picked up his first offer from Miami (OH) earlier this month. He started for the Stallions last fall and will be part of another very good secondary this coming season.

B.T. Potter, South Pointe – Potter will be one of the top kicking recruits in the country next season. He’s equally adept and punting and place-kicking and already has an offer from Mercer, a tough accomplishment for kickers who often walk-on. Potter has tons of recruiting interest from bigger schools.

Ben Tuipulotu, Nation Ford – Tuipulotu committed to BYU and will follow his brother and dad to the Utah-based football power. Tuipulotu has been a very productive two-way player for the Falcons but will probably play outside linebacker in college. The 6-foot-4, 200-pound junior made 87 tackles last season.

Shamari Williams, York – towering junior defensive end has an offer from Cincinnati despite playing just two years of football at York. Six-foot-7, 230 pounds, Williams is one of the first prospects asked about when college coaches visit Bobby Carroll’s program.

Noteworthy

Wyatt Tunall and John Erby, Chester; Nick Sciba, Clover; Ryan Heriot, Fort Mill; Jake Locklear and John Gregory, Indian Land; Desmond Stowers and Nygel Moore, Lancaster; Jaylen McFadden, Lewisville; Dewuan McCullum and Skyler DeLong, Nation Ford; Christian Steele, Northwestern; Scott Robinson Jr., South Pointe; Ladarius Allison and Lane Towery, York.

Learn more about the Top-10

Visit this link or view the videos below to learn more about the top-10:

Would they eat fried crickets?

Who are their loudest supporters on Friday nights?

Who were their most impacting youth football coaches?

Which superhero do they most relate to?

Who are the top-10 high school football recruits in The Herald’s coverage area?

High school football coaches from The Herald’s coverage area have busily hosted college coaches all spring, and for good reason.

Our area is loaded with future college football players, young men that are doing their thing on Friday nights. The Herald’s Bret McCormick spent the past few months compiling a list of players that have college football potential, and in some cases, already hold scholarship offers.

Important to keep in mind while reading this: academics is not included or mentioned in any of these profiles, but none of these guys will play Division I college football without at least a 2.3 grade point average in their core classes. Additionally, college prospects in any sport will need to pass 10 core classes by the start of their seventh semester, meaning college hopefuls can’t wait until their senior year to cram in all the important classes they’re lacking.

Learn more about college eligibility at the NCAA Clearinghouse web site and check out the top-10 recruits in our area (plus 20 more), illustrated by Rock Hill’s Garrison Gist:

1. Derion Kendrick, South Pointe

As explosive an athlete as has come through the Rock Hill area in five or six years, Kendrick has the ability to go all the way to the top. He could play either defensive back or receiver at the next level; it appears Clemson wants to use him on offense.

He threw for 3,348 yards and 37 touchdowns and also ran for 630 yards and eight touchdowns last season, while earning All-Area player of the year honors. He was also named Region 3-4A player of the year, Big 22 player of the year by WSOC-TV, the Tri-County Coaches Association 4A/5A offensive player of the year and junior class All-American, by MaxPreps.

Six-foot-1, 200 pounds, Kendrick weaves through opposing defenses almost effortlessly and he’ll be the biggest reason why South Pointe will be the favorite to win a fourth straight state title this coming season.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Kendrick committed to Clemson in late January.

Play(s) that defined his season: South Pointe in a dogfight with Belton-Honea Path in the second round of the 2016 playoffs. After a scoreless first half coach, Strait Herron pulled Kendrick aside and told him to relax and just play the Stallions’ style of football. By the end of the third quarter, South Pointe had jumped out to a four touchdown lead – three of them were passes from Kendrick.

Coach said it:

2. Josh Belk, Lewisville

Six-foot-4, 300-pound defensive tackle largely staved off serious injury problems last season to record 78 tackles, including 23 for a loss, and seven sacks. Belk committed to Clemson in late January and the limelight will be even more focused on him this fall as a senior. Lewisville coach Will Mitchell said he wanted to see his star player complete a full season without injury and also continue to emerge as a leader in the program. But even if Belk is still developing his consistency, the potential is obvious. His innate strength is obvious – he can squat nearly 600 pounds – but college coaches love the details, including his flexibility and agility for someone his size.

Scholarship offers/commitment: committed to Clemson

Play(s) that defined his season: Sure, Belk’s power is impossible to miss, especially against 1A competition. But against Eau Claire – and nearly every other team he faced last season – Belk showed where much of the power comes from: his hands. The pop from the two hands together into an opposing player’s chest keeps them on their heels and will be invaluable when Belk begins facing people his own size at Clemson.

Coach said it:

3. Jamario Holley, Northwestern

Holley’s production dipped during an injury-dinged sophomore year but he may be the closest in the area to moving as smoothly as Kendrick. The 5-foot-11, 170-pound receiver caught 34 passes for 409 yards and three touchdowns in nine games, and also averaged nearly 29 yards per kick return. He’s one of the best prospects in the area because of his elite athletic fluidity and shiftiness with the football.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, Kentucky, Florida State and Tennessee (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: The 68-yard screen pass Holley took for a touchdown against South Pointe underlined his immense potential. It’s not often that a player can make South Pointe defenders look normal, speed-wise, but Holley did just that on an eye-opening TD catch and run. The only negative? The play was called back for offensive holding.

Coach said it:

4. Eli Adams, South Pointe

When Eli Adams was a sophomore, Coach Herron knew he had a game-changing player. His speedy jump off the ball makes him extremely difficult to block, and Herron compares his quickness at the snap to Jadeveon Clowney. The 6-foot, 230-pound offensive nightmare could use a few more inches in height and wingspan, but still dominates the high school competition. He’s getting recruited to play linebacker in college, and has offers from the likes of South Carolina, Maryland, and N.C. State. Adams had 95 tackles, 17 tackles-for-loss and 10 sacks last fall as a junior.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, N.C. State, Charlotte, Old Dominion, UMass, Virginia Tech, Kansas State, Maryland and East Carolina (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: Sometimes it’s like Adams is jumping off a diving board and everyone else is jumping from the pool deck. The tackle-for-loss and strip he produced against Hartsville in the 4A state championship game led to Jalen Pickett-Hicks scooping and scoring to put the game to rest. It was indicative of the explosion Adams demonstrated regularly the last two seasons.

Coach said it:

5. Quay Hardin, Chester

At 6-foot-2, 175 pounds, Hardin is built like the prototypical modern defensive back. He was one of the top ball-hawking cornerbacks in the state last fall when he made nine interceptions and broke up 10 more passes. He had 60 tackles and also was effective as a part-time receiver, catching four TD passes.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Eastern Michigan (offer); SEC, ACC interest

Play(s) that defined his season: Hardin picked off two passes in the Cyclones’ win over Lancaster, including one that clinched the victory. The first one, though, showed off Hardin’s range and length. He got underneath a pretty well thrown ball by Bruins QB Jamias Shropshire down the right sideline but stretched to pull in the pass intended for Lancaster receiver Desmond Stowers.

Coach said it:

6. Steven Gilmore Jr., South Pointe

Gilmore pulled in 31 passes for 422 yards and five touchdowns last season, with three of those coming in the second quarter of South Pointe’s state championship win last December. He also returned a kickoff for another score. Five-foot-11 and 160 pounds, Gilmore Jr. clearly needs to bulk up but he has shiftiness similar to his older brother, South Pointe NFL product Stephon Gilmore. South Pointe coach Strait Herron said Gilmore Jr. has put too much pressure on himself at times, but that he’s dealing better with the attention his last name attracts. Since his state championship performance, Gilmore Jr. has pulled multiple FBS scholarship offers and also won the 4A long jump state championship.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, East Carolina, Georgia, Duke and Kansas State (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: In last year’s 4A State Championship, Gilmore Jr. took a screen pass out of the left flat and wiggled through defenders en route to a 54-yard touchdown. He amassed 135 yards and 3 touchdowns in that game, with South Carolina head coach Will Muschamp standing on the sideline of Williams-Brice Stadium.

Coach said it:

7. Markees Watts, Lancaster

The explosive 6-foot-2, 205-pound junior defensive end recorded 30 tackles-for-loss, 17 sacks and was named the Tri-County Coaches Association’s 4A/5A defensive player of the year last fall. Watts also broke up eight passes last season and has 47 tackles for negative yardage in the last two seasons combined. He’s played with his hand in the dirt in high school but projects as a college linebacker and could use some more experience playing in open space but his explosive fluidity and athleticism should make the transition painless.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Wofford, Charlotte, Charleston Southern, Middle Tennessee State, Mercer, Troy, South Carolina State, James Madison and Appalachian State (offer); Georgia State, N.C. State, Wake Forest, Miami (OH), Furman interest

Play(s) that defined his season: A bewildered voice says “he took the ball away from him!” midway through a clip showing Watts sacking York’s quarterback and then scooping up the fumble and returning it for a touchdown.

Coach said it:

8. Travell Crosby, Nation Ford

Crosby began to show his potential last season with 55 tackles and regular playing time at defensive tackle. Crosby’s size – 6-foot-8, 310 pounds – means he’ll be on college radars for the next year and the plan is to move him to offensive line this fall. The Queens, N.Y. native will initially play at guard where he can get his hands on defensive linemen immediately while his skills catch up to his hulking frame. Falcons coach Michael Allen said the spring and summer will be key for Crosby, who has plans to attend camps at Clemson, Coastal Carolina and probably N.C. State and South Carolina.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Clemson, Coastal Carolina, South Carolina, N.C. State interest

Play(s) that defined his season: Crosby had an obvious size advantage against any blockers he faced last fall, but not only was he driving back Northwestern offensive linemen in this clip, but watch how he cast them off to wrap up Trojan ball-carrier Jerry Howard, an ACC recruit. If Crosby can continue to develop his technical abilities, watch out.

Coach said it:

9. Pha’Leak Brown, Chester

Chester coach Victor Floyd said fans will see Brown exclusively at running back much more often this fall. He’s played there and in the secondary for Chester with success at both positions the last two years. Brown was a MaxPreps All-American as a freshman and rushed for 607 yards and 10 touchdowns last season, in addition to 44 tackles and four interceptions in defensive back duties. Five-foot-11, 180 pounds, Brown has a great body, good vision, and is elusive and really strong, especially from the waist down. Floyd said his sophomore standout is a blue collar worker in the weight room and it shows.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, Clemson, UNC, N.C. State and many others interested

Play(s) that defined his season: Watch the stutter-step as Brown cuts back into the running lane in this clip. Brown shows off the vision and the wheels that will make him an FBS recruit at running back.

Coach said it:

10. Quentin Sanders, Lewisville

Sanders should be in line for a big role in Lewisville’s offense this fall with QB Trey Keels graduating but the 5-foot-11, 190-pound running back got a crash course playing some Wildcat QB last season. He rushed for 1,175 yards and 15 TDs, and also caught 37 passes in the Lions’ spread offense for 516 yards and another four scores. Sanders could play defensive back or running back in college; Lewisville coach Will Mitchell said Marshall offered Sanders as the latter. He’s done heavy work in the weight room and has extremely long arms, which especially interests the colleges viewing the Lion standout as a cornerback.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Marshall (offer); N.C. State, Miami (Ohio) interest

Play(s) that defined his season: the first play of Sanders’ Hudl highlight from Lewisville’s loss to Lancaster two years ago is indicative of the aggression that he plays with, something Mitchell – and the college coaches visiting Richburg – love to see. Sanders was playing defensive back in the clip but he plays the same way in the offensive backfield, never going down at first contact and always finishing runs with a lowered shoulder.

Coach said it:

Ten more

(In alphabetical order)

Antonio Barber, Rock Hill – the 6-foot-2, 184-pound freshman receiver has all the physical tools to be a college football player and should be a key piece on offense for the Bearcats this coming season.

K.D. Canaty, Northwestern – former defensive lineman made a successful switch to the o-line where he graded 83 percent with seven knockdowns for the Trojans. Canaty is getting plenty of college interest.

Jamari Currence, South Pointe – defensive back intercepted seven passes and made 67 tackles during a strong junior year for the Stallions. Currence has multiple FCS offers – UMass, The Citadel, Charleston Southern, Eastern Kentucky – and easily could have slotted into the top-10 list.

B.J. Davis, South Pointe – A bit of a late bloomer because of his basketball career, Davis had a really good fall, notching 80 tackles, intercepting four passes, forcing two fumbles and recovering two more from his hybrid linebacker-safety position. The 6-foot-4 athlete could see extensive time at receiver this coming season, and has offers from Northern Iowa and S.C. State.

Mikial Fourney, Lewisville – Fourney has started every game in his three years of high school football and college coaches are intrigued by his size – 6-foot-2, 180 pounds – in the secondary. Lions coach Will Mitchell expects his rising senior to have FBS offers by the end of the summer.

Garrett Lutz, Clover – powerful and intelligent center graded 92 percent for Clover last season, recording 50 knockdown blocks and earning first team All-Area honors. He’s getting recruiting interest from Wake Forest, Furman and North Greenville.

Jaylen Mahoney, South Pointe – sophomore cornerback Mahoney picked up his first offer from Miami (OH) earlier this month. He started for the Stallions last fall and will be part of another very good secondary this coming season.

B.T. Potter, South Pointe – Potter will be one of the top kicking recruits in the country next season. He’s equally adept and punting and place-kicking and already has an offer from Mercer, a tough accomplishment for kickers who often walk-on. Potter has tons of recruiting interest from bigger schools.

Ben Tuipulotu, Nation Ford – Tuipulotu committed to BYU and will follow his brother and dad to the Utah-based football power. Tuipulotu has been a very productive two-way player for the Falcons but will probably play outside linebacker in college. The 6-foot-4, 200-pound junior made 87 tackles last season.

Shamari Williams, York – towering junior defensive end has an offer from Cincinnati despite playing just two years of football at York. Six-foot-7, 230 pounds, Williams is one of the first prospects asked about when college coaches visit Bobby Carroll’s program.

Noteworthy

Wyatt Tunall and John Erby, Chester; Nick Sciba, Clover; Ryan Heriot, Fort Mill; Jake Locklear and John Gregory, Indian Land; Desmond Stowers and Nygel Moore, Lancaster; Jaylen McFadden, Lewisville; Dewuan McCullum and Skyler DeLong, Nation Ford; Christian Steele, Northwestern; Scott Robinson Jr., South Pointe; Ladarius Allison and Lane Towery, York.

Learn more about the Top-10

Visit this link or view the videos below to learn more about the top-10:

Would they eat fried crickets?

Who are their loudest supporters on Friday nights?

Who were their most impacting youth football coaches?

Which superhero do they most relate to?