UCSB Ranked 2nd Amongst ‘Top Colleges Doing the Most for the American Dream’

UC Santa Barbara ranks second-best in the nation amongst universities “committed to economic diversity,” according to a New York Times college ranking released Thursday.

The New York Times arrived at the ranking by factoring in the number of lower-income and middle-income students that a university enrolls alongside the amount that those students pay to attend. Universities that enroll more lower and middle-income students at a lower price received the highest ranking.

UC campuses dominated the top portion of the list. UC Irvine received the highest ranking and UCSB followed after it.

UC Davis, UC San Diego and UCLA ranked third, fourth and fifth, respectively. UC Berkeley ranked ninth.

Nearly 40 percent of UCSB’s freshman class — made up of approximately 4,600 students — is receiving the Pell Grant, which the federal government awards to students from the lower half of the economic demographic.

The New York Times also reported that, with an average price of $13,000 for middle-income students, UCSB endows an average of $7,100 to each student.

The New York Times accompanied its college ranking with an op-ed piece by columnist David Leonhardt. He claims that many public universities have been enrolling less lower-to-middle-income student as a result of decreased state funding.

Public universities have been increasingly “replacing” these students with “affluent students who can afford the tuition,” Leonhardt says.

Leonhardt adds that the biggest declines in economic diversity have been amongst UC campuses, which have historically ranked at the top of The New York Times’ college ranking for the past three years.

Rather than replacing poor students, Leonhardt says, the UC has been enrolling the same number of lower-income students while increasing its enrollment of higher-income students. UC campuses have experienced “severe overcrowding” as a result, he says.

The top 10 colleges in Michigan

Olds Hall on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing. (Photo: Dave Wasinger, Lansing State Journal)

Michigan is home to many colleges that provide students with a quality education Whether you’re looking for a large university or small college, you will be able to find it in Michigan.

Looking outside of Michigan? You can find the best college in your chosen state by visiting this page. College Factual’s ranking methodology is highly focused on data related to outcomes, such as loan default rates, graduation rates and average starting salaries of graduates. You can read more about their methodology here. Below is a ranking of the top 10 schools — out of 38 total — in Michigan.

1. University of Michigan

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan is one of the oldest public universities in the country. Michigan has 19 schools and colleges that offer over 250 degree programs, including one of the best engineering and foreign language and linguistics programs in the country. In addition to numerous academic offerings, Michigan provides students with various on-campus clubs and organizations along with events to help create a community feel. Michigan is one of the best values for your money due to the strength of its programs and low net cost.

2. Michigan State University

Michigan State University (MSU) is a public university located in East Lansing. Established in 1855, the school is known for its dedication to academic excellence. The school offers more than 200 programs, many of which are among the best in the country. In addition to exceptional academics, MSU has over 600 clubs and organizations for students to join. Students at MSU have the opportunity to work alongside professors performing research and gaining hands-on experience in their field. With 19 colleges on the campus, students are sure to find a major that is right for them at MSU.

3. Albion College

Albion College is a liberal arts college located in the small town of Albion. The intimate class sizes are taught by mostly full-time teachers and help foster professional relationships between students and professors. A large part of being a member of the Albion community includes volunteering and spending time off campus. These opportunities, coupled with the extensive research projects available to undergraduates, help develop well-rounded students. The school has a high percentage of on-time graduations along with a good earnings boost that makes Albion an excellent choice for any student.

4. Calvin College

Calvin College is a liberal arts school with strong Christian roots. Calvin creates a community environment for students and encourages collaboration, service-learning and international study. With more than 100 degree programs, students can rest assured this school has the program for them. Students enjoy their time at this college because they are given the opportunity to experience hands-on learning to ensure they are prepared to enter the work force after graduation. With a 13:1 student to faculty ratio, impressive graduation rate and low net cost, Calvin College is a smart choice for any student wishing to study in Michigan.

5. Kalamazoo College

Founded in 1833, Kalamazoo College is one of the oldest schools in the country. The private liberal arts school has a high percentage of full time teachers, many of who have the highest possible degree in their field. Kalamazoo offers a unique academic experience known as the K-Plan, which is made up of a strong liberal arts education, experience learning, international and intercultural experience and independent scholarship. This innovative approach to higher education helps prepare students for future success by providing a focused and dynamic curriculum. Kalamazoo College is a great choice for any student looking for a fundamental liberal arts education.

6. Michigan Technological University

Michigan Technological University is a public research school dedicated to providing a science and technology education. With the engineering program ranked as one of the best in the country, students at Michigan Tech are sure to receive a well-rounded education that sets them up for success after graduation. Along with classroom learning, Michigan Tech students have the ability to participate in the school’s Enterprise Program, which provides hands-on experience as students work directly with outside businesses and corporations to solve real-world problems. Co-ops, internships and study abroad options provide other opportunities for students to supplement what they learn in classes and get their foot in the door at possible employers before they even graduate. A degree from Michigan Tech provides students with a good earnings boost as they enter the job force.

7. Hope College

Hope College is a private four-year institution with a strong Christian tradition. The school offers 91 programs that give the diverse student body the ability to study in the field they are passionate about. Small class sizes facilitate productive discussions and the ability for students to think on a global scale. Hope College is a “great value for your money” school and gives students the education necessary to be leaders after graduation.

8. Kettering University

Founded in 1919, Kettering University is a small, private school that combines classroom learning with hands-on practice to help prepare students for jobs after graduation. Kettering is focused on offering a STEM education that gives students a strong background in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics while also incorporating business and humanities courses. With 14 undergraduate majors and numerous concentrations, students can find the specialized area they are interested in. If you are looking for a good education with opportunities for practical experience, Kettering might be for you.

9. University of Detroit Mercy

The University of Detroit Mercy is a mid-size, private university dedicated to helping students reach their potential. As a Catholic university, the university has a strong connection to Jesuit and Mercy values. The mission of the school is to develop leaders with a strong moral compass that can better their communities after graduation. The most popular majors at the school are within in the health professions and include nursing, public health, and dental support services. The University of Detroit Mercy is a community-based school with a strong track record of providing students with a top education.

10. Andrews University

Founded in 1874, Andrews was the first institution of higher education started by Seventh-day Adventists. The university offers 130 programs and degrees in addition to encouraging community service and spiritual growth. The population at Andrews is relatively small with less than 2,000 students. This, along with an excellent student to faculty ratio, makes Andrews a great place to get individual mentoring from staff and upper classmen.

This article comes from The USA TODAY College partner network. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of USA TODAY. You understand that we have no obligation to monitor any discussion forums, blogs, photo- or video-sharing pages, or other areas of the Site through which users can supply information or material. However, we reserve the right at all times, in our sole discretion, to screen content submitted by users and to edit, move, delete, and/or refuse to accept any content that in our judgment violates these Terms of Service or is otherwise unacceptable or inappropriate, whether for legal or other reasons.

Top Colleges Doing the Most for the American Dream – The New …

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Who are the top-10 high school football recruits in The Herald’s coverage area?

High school football coaches from The Herald’s coverage area have busily hosted college coaches all spring, and for good reason.

Our area is loaded with future college football players, young men that are doing their thing on Friday nights. The Herald’s Bret McCormick spent the past few months compiling a list of players that have college football potential, and in some cases, already hold scholarship offers.

Important to keep in mind while reading this: academics is not included or mentioned in any of these profiles, but none of these guys will play Division I college football without at least a 2.3 grade point average in their core classes. Additionally, college prospects in any sport will need to pass 10 core classes by the start of their seventh semester, meaning college hopefuls can’t wait until their senior year to cram in all the important classes they’re lacking.

Learn more about college eligibility at the NCAA Clearinghouse web site and check out the top-10 recruits in our area (plus 20 more), illustrated by Rock Hill’s Garrison Gist:

1. Derion Kendrick, South Pointe

As explosive an athlete as has come through the Rock Hill area in five or six years, Kendrick has the ability to go all the way to the top. He could play either defensive back or receiver at the next level; it appears Clemson wants to use him on offense.

He threw for 3,348 yards and 37 touchdowns and also ran for 630 yards and eight touchdowns last season, while earning All-Area player of the year honors. He was also named Region 3-4A player of the year, Big 22 player of the year by WSOC-TV, the Tri-County Coaches Association 4A/5A offensive player of the year and junior class All-American, by MaxPreps.

Six-foot-1, 200 pounds, Kendrick weaves through opposing defenses almost effortlessly and he’ll be the biggest reason why South Pointe will be the favorite to win a fourth straight state title this coming season.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Kendrick committed to Clemson in late January.

Play(s) that defined his season: South Pointe in a dogfight with Belton-Honea Path in the second round of the 2016 playoffs. After a scoreless first half coach, Strait Herron pulled Kendrick aside and told him to relax and just play the Stallions’ style of football. By the end of the third quarter, South Pointe had jumped out to a four touchdown lead – three of them were passes from Kendrick.

Coach said it:

2. Josh Belk, Lewisville

Six-foot-4, 300-pound defensive tackle largely staved off serious injury problems last season to record 78 tackles, including 23 for a loss, and seven sacks. Belk committed to Clemson in late January and the limelight will be even more focused on him this fall as a senior. Lewisville coach Will Mitchell said he wanted to see his star player complete a full season without injury and also continue to emerge as a leader in the program. But even if Belk is still developing his consistency, the potential is obvious. His innate strength is obvious – he can squat nearly 600 pounds – but college coaches love the details, including his flexibility and agility for someone his size.

Scholarship offers/commitment: committed to Clemson

Play(s) that defined his season: Sure, Belk’s power is impossible to miss, especially against 1A competition. But against Eau Claire – and nearly every other team he faced last season – Belk showed where much of the power comes from: his hands. The pop from the two hands together into an opposing player’s chest keeps them on their heels and will be invaluable when Belk begins facing people his own size at Clemson.

Coach said it:

3. Jamario Holley, Northwestern

Holley’s production dipped during an injury-dinged sophomore year but he may be the closest in the area to moving as smoothly as Kendrick. The 5-foot-11, 170-pound receiver caught 34 passes for 409 yards and three touchdowns in nine games, and also averaged nearly 29 yards per kick return. He’s one of the best prospects in the area because of his elite athletic fluidity and shiftiness with the football.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, Kentucky, Florida State and Tennessee (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: The 68-yard screen pass Holley took for a touchdown against South Pointe underlined his immense potential. It’s not often that a player can make South Pointe defenders look normal, speed-wise, but Holley did just that on an eye-opening TD catch and run. The only negative? The play was called back for offensive holding.

Coach said it:

4. Eli Adams, South Pointe

When Eli Adams was a sophomore, Coach Herron knew he had a game-changing player. His speedy jump off the ball makes him extremely difficult to block, and Herron compares his quickness at the snap to Jadeveon Clowney. The 6-foot, 230-pound offensive nightmare could use a few more inches in height and wingspan, but still dominates the high school competition. He’s getting recruited to play linebacker in college, and has offers from the likes of South Carolina, Maryland, and N.C. State. Adams had 95 tackles, 17 tackles-for-loss and 10 sacks last fall as a junior.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, N.C. State, Charlotte, Old Dominion, UMass, Virginia Tech, Kansas State, Maryland and East Carolina (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: Sometimes it’s like Adams is jumping off a diving board and everyone else is jumping from the pool deck. The tackle-for-loss and strip he produced against Hartsville in the 4A state championship game led to Jalen Pickett-Hicks scooping and scoring to put the game to rest. It was indicative of the explosion Adams demonstrated regularly the last two seasons.

Coach said it:

5. Quay Hardin, Chester

At 6-foot-2, 175 pounds, Hardin is built like the prototypical modern defensive back. He was one of the top ball-hawking cornerbacks in the state last fall when he made nine interceptions and broke up 10 more passes. He had 60 tackles and also was effective as a part-time receiver, catching four TD passes.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Eastern Michigan (offer); SEC, ACC interest

Play(s) that defined his season: Hardin picked off two passes in the Cyclones’ win over Lancaster, including one that clinched the victory. The first one, though, showed off Hardin’s range and length. He got underneath a pretty well thrown ball by Bruins QB Jamias Shropshire down the right sideline but stretched to pull in the pass intended for Lancaster receiver Desmond Stowers.

Coach said it:

6. Steven Gilmore Jr., South Pointe

Gilmore pulled in 31 passes for 422 yards and five touchdowns last season, with three of those coming in the second quarter of South Pointe’s state championship win last December. He also returned a kickoff for another score. Five-foot-11 and 160 pounds, Gilmore Jr. clearly needs to bulk up but he has shiftiness similar to his older brother, South Pointe NFL product Stephon Gilmore. South Pointe coach Strait Herron said Gilmore Jr. has put too much pressure on himself at times, but that he’s dealing better with the attention his last name attracts. Since his state championship performance, Gilmore Jr. has pulled multiple FBS scholarship offers and also won the 4A long jump state championship.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, East Carolina, Georgia, Duke and Kansas State (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: In last year’s 4A State Championship, Gilmore Jr. took a screen pass out of the left flat and wiggled through defenders en route to a 54-yard touchdown. He amassed 135 yards and 3 touchdowns in that game, with South Carolina head coach Will Muschamp standing on the sideline of Williams-Brice Stadium.

Coach said it:

7. Markees Watts, Lancaster

The explosive 6-foot-2, 205-pound junior defensive end recorded 30 tackles-for-loss, 17 sacks and was named the Tri-County Coaches Association’s 4A/5A defensive player of the year last fall. Watts also broke up eight passes last season and has 47 tackles for negative yardage in the last two seasons combined. He’s played with his hand in the dirt in high school but projects as a college linebacker and could use some more experience playing in open space but his explosive fluidity and athleticism should make the transition painless.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Wofford, Charlotte, Charleston Southern, Middle Tennessee State, Mercer, Troy, South Carolina State, James Madison and Appalachian State (offer); Georgia State, N.C. State, Wake Forest, Miami (OH), Furman interest

Play(s) that defined his season: A bewildered voice says “he took the ball away from him!” midway through a clip showing Watts sacking York’s quarterback and then scooping up the fumble and returning it for a touchdown.

Coach said it:

8. Travell Crosby, Nation Ford

Crosby began to show his potential last season with 55 tackles and regular playing time at defensive tackle. Crosby’s size – 6-foot-8, 310 pounds – means he’ll be on college radars for the next year and the plan is to move him to offensive line this fall. The Queens, N.Y. native will initially play at guard where he can get his hands on defensive linemen immediately while his skills catch up to his hulking frame. Falcons coach Michael Allen said the spring and summer will be key for Crosby, who has plans to attend camps at Clemson, Coastal Carolina and probably N.C. State and South Carolina.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Clemson, Coastal Carolina, South Carolina, N.C. State interest

Play(s) that defined his season: Crosby had an obvious size advantage against any blockers he faced last fall, but not only was he driving back Northwestern offensive linemen in this clip, but watch how he cast them off to wrap up Trojan ball-carrier Jerry Howard, an ACC recruit. If Crosby can continue to develop his technical abilities, watch out.

Coach said it:

9. Pha’Leak Brown, Chester

Chester coach Victor Floyd said fans will see Brown exclusively at running back much more often this fall. He’s played there and in the secondary for Chester with success at both positions the last two years. Brown was a MaxPreps All-American as a freshman and rushed for 607 yards and 10 touchdowns last season, in addition to 44 tackles and four interceptions in defensive back duties. Five-foot-11, 180 pounds, Brown has a great body, good vision, and is elusive and really strong, especially from the waist down. Floyd said his sophomore standout is a blue collar worker in the weight room and it shows.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, Clemson, UNC, N.C. State and many others interested

Play(s) that defined his season: Watch the stutter-step as Brown cuts back into the running lane in this clip. Brown shows off the vision and the wheels that will make him an FBS recruit at running back.

Coach said it:

10. Quentin Sanders, Lewisville

Sanders should be in line for a big role in Lewisville’s offense this fall with QB Trey Keels graduating but the 5-foot-11, 190-pound running back got a crash course playing some Wildcat QB last season. He rushed for 1,175 yards and 15 TDs, and also caught 37 passes in the Lions’ spread offense for 516 yards and another four scores. Sanders could play defensive back or running back in college; Lewisville coach Will Mitchell said Marshall offered Sanders as the latter. He’s done heavy work in the weight room and has extremely long arms, which especially interests the colleges viewing the Lion standout as a cornerback.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Marshall (offer); N.C. State, Miami (Ohio) interest

Play(s) that defined his season: the first play of Sanders’ Hudl highlight from Lewisville’s loss to Lancaster two years ago is indicative of the aggression that he plays with, something Mitchell – and the college coaches visiting Richburg – love to see. Sanders was playing defensive back in the clip but he plays the same way in the offensive backfield, never going down at first contact and always finishing runs with a lowered shoulder.

Coach said it:

Ten more

(In alphabetical order)

Antonio Barber, Rock Hill – the 6-foot-2, 184-pound freshman receiver has all the physical tools to be a college football player and should be a key piece on offense for the Bearcats this coming season.

K.D. Canaty, Northwestern – former defensive lineman made a successful switch to the o-line where he graded 83 percent with seven knockdowns for the Trojans. Canaty is getting plenty of college interest.

Jamari Currence, South Pointe – defensive back intercepted seven passes and made 67 tackles during a strong junior year for the Stallions. Currence has multiple FCS offers – UMass, The Citadel, Charleston Southern, Eastern Kentucky – and easily could have slotted into the top-10 list.

B.J. Davis, South Pointe – A bit of a late bloomer because of his basketball career, Davis had a really good fall, notching 80 tackles, intercepting four passes, forcing two fumbles and recovering two more from his hybrid linebacker-safety position. The 6-foot-4 athlete could see extensive time at receiver this coming season, and has offers from Northern Iowa and S.C. State.

Mikial Fourney, Lewisville – Fourney has started every game in his three years of high school football and college coaches are intrigued by his size – 6-foot-2, 180 pounds – in the secondary. Lions coach Will Mitchell expects his rising senior to have FBS offers by the end of the summer.

Garrett Lutz, Clover – powerful and intelligent center graded 92 percent for Clover last season, recording 50 knockdown blocks and earning first team All-Area honors. He’s getting recruiting interest from Wake Forest, Furman and North Greenville.

Jaylen Mahoney, South Pointe – sophomore cornerback Mahoney picked up his first offer from Miami (OH) earlier this month. He started for the Stallions last fall and will be part of another very good secondary this coming season.

B.T. Potter, South Pointe – Potter will be one of the top kicking recruits in the country next season. He’s equally adept and punting and place-kicking and already has an offer from Mercer, a tough accomplishment for kickers who often walk-on. Potter has tons of recruiting interest from bigger schools.

Ben Tuipulotu, Nation Ford – Tuipulotu committed to BYU and will follow his brother and dad to the Utah-based football power. Tuipulotu has been a very productive two-way player for the Falcons but will probably play outside linebacker in college. The 6-foot-4, 200-pound junior made 87 tackles last season.

Shamari Williams, York – towering junior defensive end has an offer from Cincinnati despite playing just two years of football at York. Six-foot-7, 230 pounds, Williams is one of the first prospects asked about when college coaches visit Bobby Carroll’s program.

Noteworthy

Wyatt Tunall and John Erby, Chester; Nick Sciba, Clover; Ryan Heriot, Fort Mill; Jake Locklear and John Gregory, Indian Land; Desmond Stowers and Nygel Moore, Lancaster; Jaylen McFadden, Lewisville; Dewuan McCullum and Skyler DeLong, Nation Ford; Christian Steele, Northwestern; Scott Robinson Jr., South Pointe; Ladarius Allison and Lane Towery, York.

Learn more about the Top-10

Visit this link or view the videos below to learn more about the top-10:

Would they eat fried crickets?

Who are their loudest supporters on Friday nights?

Who were their most impacting youth football coaches?

Which superhero do they most relate to?

Who are the top-10 high school football recruits in The Herald’s coverage area?

High school football coaches from The Herald’s coverage area have busily hosted college coaches all spring, and for good reason.

Our area is loaded with future college football players, young men that are doing their thing on Friday nights. The Herald’s Bret McCormick spent the past few months compiling a list of players that have college football potential, and in some cases, already hold scholarship offers.

Important to keep in mind while reading this: academics is not included or mentioned in any of these profiles, but none of these guys will play Division I college football without at least a 2.3 grade point average in their core classes. Additionally, college prospects in any sport will need to pass 10 core classes by the start of their seventh semester, meaning college hopefuls can’t wait until their senior year to cram in all the important classes they’re lacking.

Learn more about college eligibility at the NCAA Clearinghouse web site and check out the top-10 recruits in our area (plus 20 more), illustrated by Rock Hill’s Garrison Gist:

1. Derion Kendrick, South Pointe

As explosive an athlete as has come through the Rock Hill area in five or six years, Kendrick has the ability to go all the way to the top. He could play either defensive back or receiver at the next level; it appears Clemson wants to use him on offense.

He threw for 3,348 yards and 37 touchdowns and also ran for 630 yards and eight touchdowns last season, while earning All-Area player of the year honors. He was also named Region 3-4A player of the year, Big 22 player of the year by WSOC-TV, the Tri-County Coaches Association 4A/5A offensive player of the year and junior class All-American, by MaxPreps.

Six-foot-1, 200 pounds, Kendrick weaves through opposing defenses almost effortlessly and he’ll be the biggest reason why South Pointe will be the favorite to win a fourth straight state title this coming season.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Kendrick committed to Clemson in late January.

Play(s) that defined his season: South Pointe in a dogfight with Belton-Honea Path in the second round of the 2016 playoffs. After a scoreless first half coach, Strait Herron pulled Kendrick aside and told him to relax and just play the Stallions’ style of football. By the end of the third quarter, South Pointe had jumped out to a four touchdown lead – three of them were passes from Kendrick.

Coach said it:

2. Josh Belk, Lewisville

Six-foot-4, 300-pound defensive tackle largely staved off serious injury problems last season to record 78 tackles, including 23 for a loss, and seven sacks. Belk committed to Clemson in late January and the limelight will be even more focused on him this fall as a senior. Lewisville coach Will Mitchell said he wanted to see his star player complete a full season without injury and also continue to emerge as a leader in the program. But even if Belk is still developing his consistency, the potential is obvious. His innate strength is obvious – he can squat nearly 600 pounds – but college coaches love the details, including his flexibility and agility for someone his size.

Scholarship offers/commitment: committed to Clemson

Play(s) that defined his season: Sure, Belk’s power is impossible to miss, especially against 1A competition. But against Eau Claire – and nearly every other team he faced last season – Belk showed where much of the power comes from: his hands. The pop from the two hands together into an opposing player’s chest keeps them on their heels and will be invaluable when Belk begins facing people his own size at Clemson.

Coach said it:

3. Jamario Holley, Northwestern

Holley’s production dipped during an injury-dinged sophomore year but he may be the closest in the area to moving as smoothly as Kendrick. The 5-foot-11, 170-pound receiver caught 34 passes for 409 yards and three touchdowns in nine games, and also averaged nearly 29 yards per kick return. He’s one of the best prospects in the area because of his elite athletic fluidity and shiftiness with the football.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, Kentucky, Florida State and Tennessee (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: The 68-yard screen pass Holley took for a touchdown against South Pointe underlined his immense potential. It’s not often that a player can make South Pointe defenders look normal, speed-wise, but Holley did just that on an eye-opening TD catch and run. The only negative? The play was called back for offensive holding.

Coach said it:

4. Eli Adams, South Pointe

When Eli Adams was a sophomore, Coach Herron knew he had a game-changing player. His speedy jump off the ball makes him extremely difficult to block, and Herron compares his quickness at the snap to Jadeveon Clowney. The 6-foot, 230-pound offensive nightmare could use a few more inches in height and wingspan, but still dominates the high school competition. He’s getting recruited to play linebacker in college, and has offers from the likes of South Carolina, Maryland, and N.C. State. Adams had 95 tackles, 17 tackles-for-loss and 10 sacks last fall as a junior.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, N.C. State, Charlotte, Old Dominion, UMass, Virginia Tech, Kansas State, Maryland and East Carolina (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: Sometimes it’s like Adams is jumping off a diving board and everyone else is jumping from the pool deck. The tackle-for-loss and strip he produced against Hartsville in the 4A state championship game led to Jalen Pickett-Hicks scooping and scoring to put the game to rest. It was indicative of the explosion Adams demonstrated regularly the last two seasons.

Coach said it:

5. Quay Hardin, Chester

At 6-foot-2, 175 pounds, Hardin is built like the prototypical modern defensive back. He was one of the top ball-hawking cornerbacks in the state last fall when he made nine interceptions and broke up 10 more passes. He had 60 tackles and also was effective as a part-time receiver, catching four TD passes.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Eastern Michigan (offer); SEC, ACC interest

Play(s) that defined his season: Hardin picked off two passes in the Cyclones’ win over Lancaster, including one that clinched the victory. The first one, though, showed off Hardin’s range and length. He got underneath a pretty well thrown ball by Bruins QB Jamias Shropshire down the right sideline but stretched to pull in the pass intended for Lancaster receiver Desmond Stowers.

Coach said it:

6. Steven Gilmore Jr., South Pointe

Gilmore pulled in 31 passes for 422 yards and five touchdowns last season, with three of those coming in the second quarter of South Pointe’s state championship win last December. He also returned a kickoff for another score. Five-foot-11 and 160 pounds, Gilmore Jr. clearly needs to bulk up but he has shiftiness similar to his older brother, South Pointe NFL product Stephon Gilmore. South Pointe coach Strait Herron said Gilmore Jr. has put too much pressure on himself at times, but that he’s dealing better with the attention his last name attracts. Since his state championship performance, Gilmore Jr. has pulled multiple FBS scholarship offers and also won the 4A long jump state championship.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, East Carolina, Georgia, Duke and Kansas State (offers)

Play(s) that defined his season: In last year’s 4A State Championship, Gilmore Jr. took a screen pass out of the left flat and wiggled through defenders en route to a 54-yard touchdown. He amassed 135 yards and 3 touchdowns in that game, with South Carolina head coach Will Muschamp standing on the sideline of Williams-Brice Stadium.

Coach said it:

7. Markees Watts, Lancaster

The explosive 6-foot-2, 205-pound junior defensive end recorded 30 tackles-for-loss, 17 sacks and was named the Tri-County Coaches Association’s 4A/5A defensive player of the year last fall. Watts also broke up eight passes last season and has 47 tackles for negative yardage in the last two seasons combined. He’s played with his hand in the dirt in high school but projects as a college linebacker and could use some more experience playing in open space but his explosive fluidity and athleticism should make the transition painless.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Wofford, Charlotte, Charleston Southern, Middle Tennessee State, Mercer, Troy, South Carolina State, James Madison and Appalachian State (offer); Georgia State, N.C. State, Wake Forest, Miami (OH), Furman interest

Play(s) that defined his season: A bewildered voice says “he took the ball away from him!” midway through a clip showing Watts sacking York’s quarterback and then scooping up the fumble and returning it for a touchdown.

Coach said it:

8. Travell Crosby, Nation Ford

Crosby began to show his potential last season with 55 tackles and regular playing time at defensive tackle. Crosby’s size – 6-foot-8, 310 pounds – means he’ll be on college radars for the next year and the plan is to move him to offensive line this fall. The Queens, N.Y. native will initially play at guard where he can get his hands on defensive linemen immediately while his skills catch up to his hulking frame. Falcons coach Michael Allen said the spring and summer will be key for Crosby, who has plans to attend camps at Clemson, Coastal Carolina and probably N.C. State and South Carolina.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Clemson, Coastal Carolina, South Carolina, N.C. State interest

Play(s) that defined his season: Crosby had an obvious size advantage against any blockers he faced last fall, but not only was he driving back Northwestern offensive linemen in this clip, but watch how he cast them off to wrap up Trojan ball-carrier Jerry Howard, an ACC recruit. If Crosby can continue to develop his technical abilities, watch out.

Coach said it:

9. Pha’Leak Brown, Chester

Chester coach Victor Floyd said fans will see Brown exclusively at running back much more often this fall. He’s played there and in the secondary for Chester with success at both positions the last two years. Brown was a MaxPreps All-American as a freshman and rushed for 607 yards and 10 touchdowns last season, in addition to 44 tackles and four interceptions in defensive back duties. Five-foot-11, 180 pounds, Brown has a great body, good vision, and is elusive and really strong, especially from the waist down. Floyd said his sophomore standout is a blue collar worker in the weight room and it shows.

Scholarship offers/commitment: South Carolina, Clemson, UNC, N.C. State and many others interested

Play(s) that defined his season: Watch the stutter-step as Brown cuts back into the running lane in this clip. Brown shows off the vision and the wheels that will make him an FBS recruit at running back.

Coach said it:

10. Quentin Sanders, Lewisville

Sanders should be in line for a big role in Lewisville’s offense this fall with QB Trey Keels graduating but the 5-foot-11, 190-pound running back got a crash course playing some Wildcat QB last season. He rushed for 1,175 yards and 15 TDs, and also caught 37 passes in the Lions’ spread offense for 516 yards and another four scores. Sanders could play defensive back or running back in college; Lewisville coach Will Mitchell said Marshall offered Sanders as the latter. He’s done heavy work in the weight room and has extremely long arms, which especially interests the colleges viewing the Lion standout as a cornerback.

Scholarship offers/commitment: Marshall (offer); N.C. State, Miami (Ohio) interest

Play(s) that defined his season: the first play of Sanders’ Hudl highlight from Lewisville’s loss to Lancaster two years ago is indicative of the aggression that he plays with, something Mitchell – and the college coaches visiting Richburg – love to see. Sanders was playing defensive back in the clip but he plays the same way in the offensive backfield, never going down at first contact and always finishing runs with a lowered shoulder.

Coach said it:

Ten more

(In alphabetical order)

Antonio Barber, Rock Hill – the 6-foot-2, 184-pound freshman receiver has all the physical tools to be a college football player and should be a key piece on offense for the Bearcats this coming season.

K.D. Canaty, Northwestern – former defensive lineman made a successful switch to the o-line where he graded 83 percent with seven knockdowns for the Trojans. Canaty is getting plenty of college interest.

Jamari Currence, South Pointe – defensive back intercepted seven passes and made 67 tackles during a strong junior year for the Stallions. Currence has multiple FCS offers – UMass, The Citadel, Charleston Southern, Eastern Kentucky – and easily could have slotted into the top-10 list.

B.J. Davis, South Pointe – A bit of a late bloomer because of his basketball career, Davis had a really good fall, notching 80 tackles, intercepting four passes, forcing two fumbles and recovering two more from his hybrid linebacker-safety position. The 6-foot-4 athlete could see extensive time at receiver this coming season, and has offers from Northern Iowa and S.C. State.

Mikial Fourney, Lewisville – Fourney has started every game in his three years of high school football and college coaches are intrigued by his size – 6-foot-2, 180 pounds – in the secondary. Lions coach Will Mitchell expects his rising senior to have FBS offers by the end of the summer.

Garrett Lutz, Clover – powerful and intelligent center graded 92 percent for Clover last season, recording 50 knockdown blocks and earning first team All-Area honors. He’s getting recruiting interest from Wake Forest, Furman and North Greenville.

Jaylen Mahoney, South Pointe – sophomore cornerback Mahoney picked up his first offer from Miami (OH) earlier this month. He started for the Stallions last fall and will be part of another very good secondary this coming season.

B.T. Potter, South Pointe – Potter will be one of the top kicking recruits in the country next season. He’s equally adept and punting and place-kicking and already has an offer from Mercer, a tough accomplishment for kickers who often walk-on. Potter has tons of recruiting interest from bigger schools.

Ben Tuipulotu, Nation Ford – Tuipulotu committed to BYU and will follow his brother and dad to the Utah-based football power. Tuipulotu has been a very productive two-way player for the Falcons but will probably play outside linebacker in college. The 6-foot-4, 200-pound junior made 87 tackles last season.

Shamari Williams, York – towering junior defensive end has an offer from Cincinnati despite playing just two years of football at York. Six-foot-7, 230 pounds, Williams is one of the first prospects asked about when college coaches visit Bobby Carroll’s program.

Noteworthy

Wyatt Tunall and John Erby, Chester; Nick Sciba, Clover; Ryan Heriot, Fort Mill; Jake Locklear and John Gregory, Indian Land; Desmond Stowers and Nygel Moore, Lancaster; Jaylen McFadden, Lewisville; Dewuan McCullum and Skyler DeLong, Nation Ford; Christian Steele, Northwestern; Scott Robinson Jr., South Pointe; Ladarius Allison and Lane Towery, York.

Learn more about the Top-10

Visit this link or view the videos below to learn more about the top-10:

Would they eat fried crickets?

Who are their loudest supporters on Friday nights?

Who were their most impacting youth football coaches?

Which superhero do they most relate to?

PODCAST: Top Ten Best Value Colleges Tilt Towards The West

Listen to the full episode:

Few aspiring college students and their parents aren’t quaking at the thought of college prices, especially as they continue to rise. Caroline Howard, executive digital editor at Forbes, has compiled a Best Value College list comprised of 300 schools that offer a meaningful return on investment.

BERKELEY, CA – MAY 22: A view of Sather Tower on the UC Berkeley campus on May 22, 2014 in Berkeley, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Notably, four of the top ten are University of California public schools with U.C. Berkeley taking the lead. UCLA follows at No. 2. U.C. Irvine and U.C. Davis are at No. 8 and No. 9, respectively.  All are research institutions with an emphasis on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). What comes in “last” at No. 300 on the carefully culled list? It’s another California public school, Sonoma State University.

Tune in to this episode of The Forbes List to hear Howard talk about the metrics behind the list and the schools that made the cut.

Top Colleges Doing the Most for the American Dream

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Top Colleges Still Doing the Most for Low-Income Students

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DU Admission 2017: 5 Best Arts Colleges In South Campus

New Delhi:  University of Delhi has two campuses in the city – North campus and South campus. Each campus boasts of an array of colleges which feature in the list of top colleges in India. Both the campuses have their own merit and a distinct campus culture. Delhi University South Campus is located near Benito Juarez Marg in Delhi. The campus has some prominent colleges in its kitty like LSR, Sri Venkateswara College, JMC etc. In this article we have curated  a list of 5 colleges in South Campus which are famous for their undergraduate courses in Arts. 
 lsr
Lady Shri Ram College for Women: Lady Shri Ram College for Women popularly known as LSR, is located in the South Campus of Delhi University. The college is ranked among the top colleges in country for arts courses. The college offers BA (honors) program in 9 different specializations – Economics, English, Hindi, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Sanskrit, Sociology, Psychology.
 sri venkateswara
Sri Venkateswara College: Sri Venkateswara College is at the heart of South Campus, located near the South Campus administrative block. The college offers BA (honors) courses in Economics, English, Hindi, Sanskrit, History, Political Science, and Sociology. The college also has BA Programme course. 
 jmc
Jesus and Mary College: Jesus and Mary College or JMC is a minority institution for women which has its 50 per cent seats reserved for Catholics and Christians. Students who wish to study at JMC have to fill a separate application form along with the centralized DU application form. The college offers BA (honors) in Economics, English, Hindi, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. The college also has BA Programme course. 

Read Here: Best 5 Arts Colleges In DU North Campus
 

kamla nehru college
Kamla Nehru College for Women: Kamla Nehru College is an all women college. The college offers BA (honors) courses in Economics, English, Geography, Hindi, History, Journalism, Mathematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sanskrit and Sociology. The college also has BA Programme courses in various specializations.
 delhi college of arts and commerce
Delhi College of Arts and Commerce: As the name suggests, this college offers various programmes in Arts and Commerce stream. The college offers BA (honors) in English, Economics, Journalism, History, and Political Science. The college also has BA Programme course. 

Click here for more Education News

2 Centre County communities recognized on list of top 250 places to live for college grads

May is graduation month for most colleges and universities and while four years of hard work is in the past, graduates face the difficult decision of choosing a city to begin their careers. To help in the decision making process, LendEDU has compiled a list of the 250 best cities for post-graduates to purchase real estate and two Centre County cities made the list.

About 30,000 cities were evaluated using the most recent data collected and licensed by Onboard informatics, a national real-estate data firm located in New York City.

State College is ranked 31 and Bellefonte is ranked 228 on the list. Eight Pennsylvania cites made the list, but Centre County is the only county in the state with two.

LendEDU, a student loan consolidation and refinance company arrived at the 250-city list by producing a final score generated from age ratio, cost of living, income growth, entertainment experience commute and single resident ratio scores.

Grand Forks, N.D., edged out Laramie, Wyo., for No. 1 in the country. Arkansas and Louisiana are tied at 17 for the largest number of cities on the list.

Centre County Commissioner Mark Higgins presented the board of commissioners with the list at their weekly meeting Tuesday.

“It’s important to note that in comparison to 30,000 other cities in the country, Bellefonte is now nationally ranked as a place for young people to move,” Higgins said. “That is a very pleasant thing to find out.”

Centre County has fared well recently on national rankings lists. Houserville was ranked third and Lemont 11th on the 2017 best places to live in America list generated by niche.com. In 2016, Ferguson Township and College Township were ranked in the top 15 best places to live in America.

“I sometimes take it for granted that it’s such an amazing place we live in,” said Michael Pipe, chairman of the board of commissioners. “But when I take a step back, I realize that there is a plethora or reasons to come to Centre County and there are so many resources available to create the life that you want to create.”