Delhi University Admissions 2017: First cut-off released, top colleges record dip in most courses

Many top colleges of the Delhi University have recorded a dip in their cut-off for admissions in most courses. The University’s first cut-off list for the academic year 2017-18 saw a dip of 0.25-3 percentage points across colleges in many subjects, including popular BCom (Hons) and BA (Hons) Economics.

Shri Ram College of Commerce (SRCC), one of the most sought-after institute in Delhi, on Friday released its first cut-off for BCom (Hons) and BA (Hons) Economics with highest for both being 97.75 per cent for general category. Last year, SRCC announced its cut-off at 98.25 per cent and 98 per cent for Economics Honours and BCom Honours respectively.

Ramjas College also recorded a dip of 0.25-2 percentage points this time. The cut-off for BCom (Hons) is at 97.5 pc, a dip of 1.75 percentage points from last year’s 99.25 pc. The cut-off for Economics (Hons) has dipped by 1 percentage point to 97.5 pc as compared to last year’s 98.5 pc. 

Similarly, Lady Shri Ram College for Women has also recorded a dip in cut-off for many courses. Reportedly, 11 out of 14 undergraduate courses have seen a drop in cut-off.

Hans Raj College has also seen a dip in its cut-off. Most of the courses have either have the same cut-off as the last year or have recorded a drop of 0.25-1 percentage points. The college kept the cut-off for Economics (Hons) at 97.25 pc and B.Com (Hons) at 97.5 pc. The cut-off for English (hons) is same as last year at 97 pc.

Contrary to the trend in most colleges, SGTB Khalsa College has announced an increase in its cut-off. Political Science (99pc) has recorded a jump of 1.50 percentage points from last year’s 97.50 pc. The college has the highest cut-off for English (Hons) at 98.75pc, B.Com at 98.25pc.

The lower number of applications and a dip in pass percentage in the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) exam is believed to be the reason behind dip in cut-offs.  The Delhi University has received about 30,000 fewer applications this year while there are 2,000 more seats this time because of introduction of new courses.

The Delhi University received around 3.2 lakh online applications against 54,000 seats for 60 undergraduate programmes in 62 colleges under the varsity this year. Last year, the number of applications (both online and offline) received by DU crossed 3.4 lakh.

Much preferred courses among the lot this time were BA (Hons) English with 1,24,220 registrations, 1,04,975 for BCom, 1,34,847 for BA and 95,497 for BA (Hons) Political Science.

Most of the applicants belonged to Delhi (1,20,514), Uttar Pradesh (62,024), Haryana (38,702) and Bihar (10,783). Among the southern states, a majority of the applications (2,502) came from Kerala.

See the full cut-off list of Delhi University here.

State board students hit in top colleges as cut-offs rise

Mumbai: The first cut-offs for admissions to top-rung degree colleges have crossed 96% in some popular self-financed courses for this academic year, especially for students from the commerce stream. On the first day of admissions, BCom at HR College was available only for those who scored more than 96%—up from last year’s 95%. At NM and Jai Hind colleges the cut-offs stood at 95.6% and 94% compared with 95.2% and 92.9% last year, respectively. The cut-offs in self-financed courses, especially in allied commerce ones, rose by 1-2% in most colleges from the previous year.

Most seats in top colleges were taken by students of CBSE and ICSE boards.

Higher cut-offs in the first merit list made it difficult for state board students to get a seat as their marks are comparatively lower. At HR, for instance, only 10 state board students made it to the first list in all the six courses put together, said in-charge principal Parag Thakkar.

While the arts cut-off for students from other boards at St Xavier’s College was at 98.2%, for HSC students they closed at 92.46% in the first list. After admitting students in the in-house quota, the college had around 11 seats for students from other boards and six for HSC board. In colleges such as Mithibai, Jai Hind and Ruia, arts closed at 94.8%, 94% and 93%, respectively, in the first list. All these colleges have seen a marginal increase in arts’ cut-offs. Principals called the rising interest “a welcome trend”. Ashok Wadia, principal of Jai Hind College, said that the highest scorer in their arts’ list was a student with 98%, indicating that high-scorers are increasingly opting for arts.

Among the job-oriented self-financed courses, cut-offs for BMS (commerce) rose above 96% in three colleges (see box), whereas most colleges saw a drop in BMM—another popular course. Cut-offs dropped at HR and KC colleges for BMM by 1-2%. On the other hand, BCom (accounting and finance) and BCom (banking and insurance) saw higher cut-offs across colleges. Allied science courses, too, saw a rise in the highest scores in the first list. “Students opting for BMM also have an option to join the BA course in film and television production. Science courses such as biotechnology and computer science have seen more demand from students,” said Hemlata Bagla, in-charge principal, KC College. Amee Vora, vice-principal of NM College, said that the cut-offs in minority quota have also seen a marginal increase this year.

Shobana Vasudevan, principal, Podar College, said their cut-offs have increased marginally for commerce courses. She even pointed out that most minority colleges have higher cut-offs as the seats left in the open category are very limited. Most of the city’s top-rung colleges, including St Xavier’s, HR, JaI Hind, NM, and KC, are all minority colleges.

Several students who scored in the 90s, too, could not make it to the top-rung colleges and were left disappointed after the list was out. “I expected this because of the better CBSE results. I am slightly sad because I did not get a bad score and am hopeful of getting through in the next rounds,” said Maahika, an in-house student at HR who secured 92.3 % but failed to meet the BMS cutoff. Khushi from Vizag, who scored 94% but couldn’t make it to the first merit list for Xavier’s for first-year BA, too, said, “I was quite hopeful of getting in at least for the second list, but since the first list closed at 98.2%, all my hopes have been crushed.”

Some students went the length to criticize the board and the quota system for admissions, terming it “unfair”. “The quotas take up a lot of seats and students in open category suffer,” said Divya Agarwal, who despite scoring 86.3% did not secure an admission into HR for BMS. A parent from Rajkot said they will be back for the next list as her son wants to study BMS in Mumbai. Most students hope that the cut-offs in the second list will drop by at least some extent, making space for them in some of these top colleges. The second list is expected on June 28.

This year, most colleges received more applications. Marie Fernandes, principal, St Andrew’s College, said their college has received an unprecedented number of applications for BMS. “For the 120 non-minority seats in BMS, we have received over 1,000 applications and the numbers kept pouring in even on Thursday,” she said. Many could not release their merit list sharp at 5pm due to the sheer numbers of applications.

(Inputs by Ishaan Kapoor Ishita Das)

How much money people borrow to attend the top 20 US colleges — and how much they earn later on


Harvard University graduation
College
is a big investment. Harvard University
pictured.

Paul
Marotta/Getty


A college education is a huge investment of both time
and money — so it’s helpful to know which schools and
programs are worth it. 

With that in mind, Nitro, an online resource that
helps incoming college students plan their education financing,
examined
median student-loan debt and median earnings 10 years after
graduation
at the top 20 colleges and universities in
the US, as ranked by US News and World Report.

The Nitro study used data from the US Department of
Education (ED) to show the relationship between future earnings
and the loans students took out to finance their degrees.

The median student debt at Harvard University, for example,
is $6,500, and median earnings 10 years after graduation is
$95,500.

The ED has data for federal loans only, so private loans
are not part of this analysis. Median student debt as part of
this study, therefore, is reflective of people who went to the
federal government to take out loans, which means students who
received financial aid from their college, or those who paid
full-price for tuition without taking out loans, are not included
in the analysis.

The schools listed in the study offer high earning
potential while graduating students who typically have some
of the lowest student debt levels in the nation. While the
reasons for this dichotomy are varied, at some institutions it
may relate to the generous financial aid packages the
schools are able to provide. Universities like Harvard and Yale
have multibillion dollar endowments and are able to provide a
good deal of tuition for students in need. At these same schools,
there also tend to be a large number of wealthy
families who do not need to take out loans to pay the quarter of
a million dollars it normally costs to graduate.

Take a look below to see how much money people are borrowing —
and earning — at the top schools in the US:



Top 20 universities  US News Ranking

Business Insider / Diana
Yukari

State board students hit in top colleges as cut-offs rise | Mumbai …

MUMBAI: The first cut-offs for admissions to top-rung degree colleges have crossed 96% in some popular self-financed courses for this academic year, especially for students from the commerce stream.

On the first day of admissions, BCom at HR College was available only for those who scored more than 96%–up from last year’s 95%. At NM and Jai Hind colleges the cutoffs stood at 95.6% and 94% compared with 95.2% and 92.9% last year, respectively.

The cut-offs in self-financed courses, especially in allied commerce ones, rose by 1-2% in most colleges from the previous year. Most seats in top colleges were taken by students of CBSE and ICSE boards.

Higher cut-offs in the first merit list made it diffi cult for state board stu dents to get a seat as their marks are comparatively lower. At HR, for instance, only 10 state board students made it to the first list in all the six courses put together, said in-charge principal Parag Thakkar.

While the arts cut-off for students from other boards at St Xavier’s College was at 98.2%, for HSC students they closed at 92.46% in the first list.

After admitting students in the in-house quota, the college had around 11 seats for students from other boards and six for HSC board. In colleges such as Mithibai, Jai Hind and Ruia, arts closed at 94.8%, 94% and 93%, respectively , in the first list. All these colleges have seen a marginal increase in arts’ cut-offs.

Principals called the rising interest “a welcome trend”. Ashok Wadia, principal of Jai Hind College, said the highest scorer in their arts’ list was a student with 98%, indicating that high-scorers are increasingly opting for arts.

Among the job-oriented self-financed courses, cut-offs for BMS (commerce) rose above 96% in three colleges (see box), whereas most colleges saw a drop in BMM–another popular course. Cut-offs dropped at HR and KC colleges for BMM by 1-2%.

On the other hand, BCom (accounting and finance) and BCom (banking and insurance) saw higher cutoffs across colleges. Allied science courses, too, saw a rise in the highest scores in the first list.

“Students opting for BMM also have an option to join the BA course in film and television production. Science courses such as biotechnology and computer science have seen more demand from students,” said Hemlata Bagla, in-charge principal, KC College. Amee Vora, vice-principal of NM College, said that the cut-offs in minority quota have also seen a marginal increase this year.

Shobana Vasudevan, principal, Podar College, said their cut-offs have increased marginally for commerce courses.She said most minority colleges have higher cut-offs as seats left in the open category are very limited. Most top-rung colleges, including St Xavier’s, HR, JaI Hind, NM, and KC, are all minority colleges.

Several students who sco red in the 90s, too, could not make it to top-rung colleges and were left disappointed after the list was out. “I expected this because of the better CBSE results. I am slightly sad because I did not get a bad score and am hopeful of getting through in the next rounds,” said Maahika, an in-house student at HR who secured 92.3 % but failed to meet the BMS cutoff.

Khushi from Vizag, who scored 94% but couldn’t make it to the first merit list for Xavier’s for firstyear BA, too, said, “I was quite hopeful of getting in at least for the second list, but since the first list closed at 98.2%, all my hopes have been crushed.”

Some students went the length to criticize the board and the quota system for admissions, terming it “unfair”. “The quotas take up a lot of seats and students in open category suffer,” said Divya Agarwal, who despite scoring 86.3% did not secure an admission into HR for BMS. A parent from Rajkot said they will be back for the next list as her son wants to study BMS in Mumbai. The second list is expected on June 28.

This year, most colleges received more applications. Marie Fernandes, principal, St Andrew’s College, spoke of an unprecedented number of applications for BMS. “For the 120 non-minority seats in BMS, we have received over 1,000 applications and the numbers kept pouring in even on Thursday.”

OU named among top colleges in Michigan for business majors

Payscale and Zippia recently named Oakland University among top colleges for business majors in Michigan. The organizations recognized Oakland based on career outcomes and return on educational investment for graduates of Oakland’s School of Business Administration. 

 

Payscale’s 2017 College ROI Report lists Oakland among top schools for both its annual return on investment and 20-year return on investment for business majors. Using its Business Quality Index to rank which programs offer the best career opportunities, San Francisco-based Zippia named Oakland as one of the top 10 colleges in Michigan for business majors.

 

“The Oakland business school has an outstanding reputation in our region,” said Dr. Michael A. Mazzeo, dean and professor of finance in Oakland’s School of Business Administration. “Employers actively seek our graduates for professional positions in their organizations.”

 

Oakland business graduates benefit from the school’s focus on integrating real-world experience into a strong business curriculum. Coupled with an increased emphasis on connecting students to employers throughout their education, Oakland University business students are prepared to launch successful careers. With an average 94 percent placement rate and steadily increasing starting salaries, Oakland business graduates land career positions at organizations across industries.

 

“While ratings and recognition do not the tell the whole story, they do reinforce and enhance the value of a business degree from Oakland University,” Mazzeo added. “External recognition of our program and successful graduates is a testament to our dedicated staff, experienced faculty and excellent programming.”

 

Most recently, The Princeton Review placed Oakland University on its list of Best Business Schools while CEO Magazine named the Oakland MBA and Executive MBA programs among the best for students.

 

PayScale has been utilizing crowdsourced data to create better transparency around compensation for more than a decade. Realizing education can play an important role in career opportunity and success, and ultimately compensation, Payscale began using its data to better understand the relationship between educational choices and career success. PayScale’s College ROI Report has been keeping track of the monetary value of a college education at hundreds of colleges and universities for years.

 

Zippia’s Business Quality Index gathered information on career results, business emphasis and school performance from the National Center for Educational Statistics and College Scorecard data from ED.gov to determine which schools offer the best career opportunities for business majors. Zippia provides career information and tools for professionals across various industries.

Learn more about OU’s School of Business Administration at oakland.edu/business.

-By Kyle Wills

 

Student debt and earning potential at top colleges – Business Insider


Harvard University graduation
College
is a big investment. Harvard University
pictured.

Paul
Marotta/Getty


A college education is a huge investment of both time
and money — so it’s helpful to know which schools and
programs are worth it. 

With that in mind, Nitro, an online resource that
helps incoming college students plan their education financing,
examined
median student-loan debt and median earnings 10 years after
graduation
at the top 20 colleges and universities in
the US, as ranked by US News and World Report.

The Nitro study used data from the US Department of
Education (ED) to show the relationship between future earnings
and the loans students took out to finance their degrees.

The median student debt at Harvard University, for example,
is $6,500, and median earnings 10 years after graduation is
$95,500.

The ED has data for federal loans only, so private loans
are not part of this analysis. Median student debt as part of
this study, therefore, is reflective of people who went to the
federal government to take out loans, which means students who
received financial aid from their college, or those who paid
full-price for tuition without taking out loans, are not included
in the analysis.

The schools listed in the study offer high earning
potential while graduating students who typically have some
of the lowest student debt levels in the nation. While the
reasons for this dichotomy are varied, at some institutions it
may relate to the generous financial aid packages the
schools are able to provide. Universities like Harvard and Yale
have multibillion dollar endowments and are able to provide a
good deal of tuition for students in need. At these same schools,
there also tend to be a large number of wealthy
families who do not need to take out loans to pay the quarter of
a million dollars it normally costs to graduate.

Take a look below to see how much money people are borrowing —
and earning — at the top schools in the US:



Top 20 universities  US News Ranking

Business Insider / Diana
Yukari

Markelle Fultz shows that you don’t have to win in college to be a top NBA draft pick

A few months of added perspective have cemented the notion that the 2016-17 college basketball season is destined to be remembered as an unsatisfying campaign. Disagreement may come from fans decked out in Carolina Blue or those who had waited over a decade for Gonzaga’s Final Four breakthrough, but for everyone else, there is significant evidence to back up our case.

First there was Duke, the preseason No. 1 that dealt with too many injuries (both player and head coach) and off-the-court distractions (hi, Grayson) to ever make a real run at being the “superteam” so many were predicting them to be at the start of the year. There was a so-so regular season followed by a March that was noticeably lacking in madness. There was, at least, a national championship game perfectly set up to be one of the most memorable in the sport’s history. The whistles robbed us of all that, and a whistle that wasn’t blown in the final minute robbed us of a last chance for the game to be saved.

Then there was Markelle Fultz.

Say what you want about the one-and-done era, but it’s afforded college basketball fans the opportunity to spend four months each winter watching a few of the most talented players in the world compete at a level they would have totally bypassed a decade earlier. In the 1990s, we never would have gotten to see Anthony Davis win a national title at Kentucky, watch Tyus Jones and Jahlil Okafor usher in a new era of Duke basketball, hear Kevin Durant talk about how much he embraced the college experience.

Then there is Markelle Fultz.

It feels strange, almost wrong, to talk about Fultz in terms that paint him as something of a mystery. After all, we’re discussing someone who was a consensus top-10 recruit in the country coming out of high school. Someone who has held his spot at the top of 2017 mock drafts across the internet for about 12 months now. Someone with enough ability to make the Philadelphia 76ers believe he’s worth giving up a significant amount to trade up and select first overall on Thursday night.

NBA scouts and executives know how good Fultz is. Those with access to his highlight films and the desire and time to watch them do too. For everyone else, Fultz might be the most unfamiliar No. 1 pick since Kwame Brown and Andrea Bargnani were hearing their names called first at the beginning of the century.

Fultz’s Washington Huskies were eliminated from the 2016-17 national conversation before Christmas. They opened the season with an embarrassing home loss to Yale, then were dealt four consecutive defeats between Nov. 26 and Dec. 11. The third of those was a humiliating, 98-71, nationally televised thumping at the hands of Gonzaga, in which it became apparent that despite Fultz’s talents, U-Dub wasn’t going to have a major impact on college basketball during his stay.

On Jan. 18, Washington pulled out an 85-83 home victory over Colorado in overtime. It was the last game they would win all season. The Huskies’ 2-16 conference record was its worst ever mark as a member of the Pac-12, and its nine total wins at the end of the season were three fewer than the Washington football team had won. Head coach Lorenzo Romar was fired after the season, leading to a mass exodus of current players and committed recruits. Included in that group was the No. 1 overall player in the class of 2017, Michael Porter Jr., who will now suit up for Missouri in 2017-18.

Despite all this, Fultz’s path has remained unaffected. He arrived at college last summer expecting to hear his name called first overall in the next year’s NBA draft, and on Thursday he will have that vision realized.

If Fultz’s story seems familiar, it’s because we saw essentially the same scenario play out the year before.

Ben Simmons stunned everyone in late 2014 when he strayed from the norm and signed with LSU, a power-conference program without a great deal of recent success. As was the case with Fultz and Washington, the Simmons experiment in Baton Rouge did not go according to plan. Though LSU managed to stay near the national spotlight for much longer than Washington did — shoutout to ESPN for the assist there —- the result was ultimately the same: The Tigers never appeared to play anything resembling motivated basketball, they missed out on the NCAA tournament, and a year later, their head coach was looking for a new job.

Three months after he had packed up and left his college apartment in the middle of the spring semester, Simmons was selected No. 1 overall by the Philadelphia 76ers.

A quick look at Scout’s top 100 players for the class of 2017 would indicate that teenage phenoms across the country have been paying attention the past couple of years. In addition to Porter Jr. going to Missouri, second-ranked Mohamed Bamba is headed to Texas, sixth-ranked Collin Sexton will suit up for Alabama, and eighth-ranked Mitchell Robinson will spend a year in Bowling Green playing for the Hilltoppers of Western Kentucky.

Only two players ranked in the top 15 of the 2018 class have committed to colleges. One to Auburn, which hasn’t been to the NCAA tournament since 2003, and the other to Arkansas, which hasn’t been to the Sweet 16 since 1996.

Kentucky’s John Calipari was the first to preach the sentiment now echoed by Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski: “Come play one season for us and then hear your name called early in the NBA draft. Look at all these other guys who have done it.”

They haven’t been lying.

Now, the experiences of Simmons and Fultz have put out a new message that could grow in strength as we dive into the second decade of the one-and-done era: “Play wherever you want and lose as much as you want for a few months. If you’re good enough at what you do, it’s not going to matter a damn bit.”

That message isn’t any less true than Coach Cal’s or Coach K’s.

That might not be the lasting impact college basketball fans would have preferred to see supreme talents like Fultz and Simmons make on the sport, but it’s still an impact.

Longhorns’ Allen tops NBA prospects from Texas colleges | Fort …

The race to be the first basketball player selected from a college in the Lone Star State should not involve much drama during Thursday’s NBA draft (6 p.m., ESPN).

Most mock drafts and NBA scouts agree that former Texas center Jarrett Allen, who averaged 13.4 points and 8.4 rebounds per game in his lone season with the Longhorns, will be the first prospect from a Texas college selected by an NBA team. Allen shot 56.6 percent from the field last season as a 6-foot-11 freshman, scoring in double digits 25 times for a Longhorns team that posted an 11-22 record.

Allen projects to be taken in the middle of the first round, with the drama likely to focus on whether he becomes the eighth player in school history to emerge as a lottery pick. Since 2004, a lottery pick has included the top 14 selections in the NBA Draft.

“What I would watch for in this year’s draft is, yeah, to me, the two top guys still remain [Markelle] Fultz and [Lonzo] Ball, very mature young players who are going to have an impact I think,” said Fran Fraschilla, college basketball analyst and international basketball expert, during a conference call earlier this week.

“And then from three down to nine or 10, you’ve got a combination of three more point guards, a couple of outstanding wing players in [Josh] Jackson and [Jayson] Tatum, and then after nine or 10, you’re going to see a run of young, talented but incomplete young big men starting with Zach Collins, John Collins, Jarrett Allen, Justin Patton, right on down the line.”

Based on Tuesday’s projections in two mock drafts, Allen has been targeted to go with the No. 16 pick (Chicago) or No. 17 pick (Milwaukee). Texas’ last lottery pick was forward Myles Turner, a Euless Trinity graduate taken with the No. 11 pick by Indiana in the 2015 draft.

Most NBA scouts rank Allen among the top three centers.

Former SMU forward Semi Ojeleye earned a first-round projection in the mock draft by draftexpress.com (No. 25 pick, Orlando) but slipped to the second round in a projection by NBAdraft.net (No. 34 pick, Sacramento). Ojeleye, who began his college career at Duke, averaged 19 points and 6.9 rebounds per game last season for the Mustangs.

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Both mock drafts project a second-round selection for former Baylor forward Johnathan Motley, who averaged 17.2 points and 9.9 rebounds per game last season for the Bears.

Among players with Texas connections, the highest-rated prospect is former Kentucky point guard De’Aaron Fox, who played at Cypress Lakes High School in suburban Houston. As a freshman, Fox averaged 16.7 points and 4.6 assists per game. He projects as a consensus top-six pick, which means the Dallas Mavericks (No. 9 selection) probably would need to trade up in Thursday’s first round in order to land Fox.

“De’Aaron has certainly created a buzz, not only because of his speed and the way he played this season, but as you know, he has a magnetic personality that at worst is going to sell a lot of shoes if he becomes a good player in the NBA; and at best, it’s going to make him one of the elite point guards in the NBA someday,” Fraschilla said.

The Mavericks’ midseason acquisition of Nerlens Noel, a 23-year-old center taken No. 6 overall in the 2013 draft, probably eliminates Dallas as a future NBA home for Allen. But if he’s taken among the first 14 picks, Allen would join a list of Longhorns lottery selections that includes Kevin Durant (No. 2 pick in 2007), LaMarcus Aldridge (No. 2 pick in 2006), Tristan Thompson (No. 4 pick in 2011), Chris Mihm (No. 7 pick in 2000), T.J. Ford (No. 8 pick in 2003), D.J. Augustin (No. 9 pick in 2008) and Turner.

Despite Top Grades, Undocumented Students See College Dreams Deferred

Launch gallery

Illustration: Erik N. Rodriguez

On a frigid day last December, 18-year-old Andrés was huddled in the locker room of North-Grand High School in West Humboldt Park after swim practice, gripping his best friend’s phone. The two had swapped shortly after seeing notifications that decision letters from their dream school, a four-year state university, had arrived—both were too nervous to look at their own results.

Andrés glimpsed at the screen—“You got in!” he yelled over.

“You too!” came the reply.

It should have been a moment of joy in the high school senior’s young life, but when he returned to his family’s two-bedroom apartment a few blocks from school and greeted his mother with his decision result, the two wept together—his mother out of joy, him because of a more complex mixture of emotion. “I remember being so happy, but at the same time heartbroken,” Andrés says.

Though the school, one of the top public universities in the country, had accepted Andrés, his immigration status meant he could not apply for financial aid from the government. Without that, he is unable to attend.

Today is the last day of high school for Andrés and his classmates. According to school officials, he joins a large number of non-citizen students who achieved outstanding grades in school but cannot attend their top college choice due to citizenship restrictions on government financial aid. If he had a Social Security number, his household annual income of $35,000 would have qualified him for help.

American college students are heavily dependent on financial aid: The U.S. Department of Education reports that 86 percent of incoming undergraduates in 2014 were awarded some form of aid, and 68 percent of all aid comes from federal funds, according to a CollegeBoard study. State funds also are an essential source for public university tuition, but in Illinois, undocumented students are ineligible.

Andrés’s mother brought him from a small village in central Mexico to the U.S. at four years old. Since then he has grown up in Chicago’s West Side, studying hard in school, sweating it out on the volleyball court and in the pool afterwards, all while saving up money from a lifeguarding job. He attained the highest ACT score of North-Grand’s senior class and his GPA is in the top five percent of his grade—all in an effort to get into the school of his dreams.

“I realize that I had achieved my goal,” he says. “I got accepted by my top school. But I wish I hadn’t. That way I could tell myself, ‘You wouldn’t have gotten in anyway.’”

At the end of April, North-Grand held its annual college decision ceremony, where students take the stage to announce their future schools. The auditorium pulsed with music as the senior class filed in that day, a spotlight gliding over the stage’s scarlet curtains and bouquets of silver balloons. As student after student posed in front of a projector screen that flashed college names, Andrés and many of his fellow undocumented students stayed seated.

Their school choices were held up by the complex tangle of financial issues that often plague undocumented students. Andrés’s own decision came hours after the ceremony, when he heard back from a private school in Chicago — and was told he didn’t receive the scholarship he needed to attend. That meant he would be at a community college this fall.

“It was just a wake up call,” Andrés says about that day. “I’m going to do my best wherever I go… We have to work so hard just to get everything that others are just handed.”

Other undocumented students at North-Grand felt a similar aversion during the ceremony. Though Isabel, who arrived from Mexico at age 9, and Camila, a Honduran-born immigrant who ranks third in their class, did walk on stage, neither is attending her top school. (All three agreed to be interviewed for this story on condition of having their names changed.)

Isabel has been on the honor roll since freshman year despite arriving in the U.S. without understanding English. She was accepted to her dream school, a private university in a suburb of Chicago—but she cannot go.

“[Community college is] the only option I have now,” she says. “It was hard. I saw everyone getting these amazing opportunities to go to a four-year school and I didn’t have that.”

On stage and off, undocumented students bore a heavy burden that day, despite hiding it in front of their classmates, says Jessica Vargas, a counselor at the school: “We know a little more about what’s behind the smile,” she says. “They’re happy to be on stage and declare. But we know that’s not necessarily set in stone yet.” Vargas estimates about 20 to 30 percent of the school’s graduating class this year is undocumented. Her colleague Arturo Fuentes, another North-Grand counselor, says that in his experience, the majority of these students are unable to enroll in their top-choice schools.

“To not even have access to those additional funds is a big barrier for our undocumented students,” says Janice Jackson, chief education officer of CPS.

Chicago shelters one of the most populous undocumented communities in the nation, numbering 183,000, according to a 2014 study by the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights. CPS does not collect data on citizenship status, but Hispanics make up almost half of this year’s enrollment. On February 16’s “A Day Without Immigrants,” a nationwide student and worker boycott against President Donald Trump’s immigration policies, Hispanic student attendance dropped to 76 percent from the previous day’s 94 percent, according to the district.

Chicago has long been a sanctuary city, and CPS issued the first directive from a major school district to not comply with federal immigration agents this February.

“Dreamers are a critical part of our CPS and school community,” Jackson says. “Many are college-bound and it is our responsibility to make sure they don’t see any barriers to college just like any other students. It’s a place where I’m proud of the culture.”

There is some additional assistance for Illinois’s undocumented students: those who  attended an Illinois high school for at least three years while living with a parent or guardian and have a parent who immigrated to the U.S. can receive in-state public tuition, provided they sign an affidavit promising to seek legal citizenship as soon as possible. As of 2012, they can also apply for the privately financed Illinois Dream Fund Scholarship. The fund initially planned for $6,000 scholarships, but has reportedly been cash-strapped in the past, given its inability for public dollars.

Finally, the mayor’s office and the City Colleges of Chicago network offer a STAR scholarship, which Andrés and Isabel both earned and will utilize after meeting the minimum 3.0 GPA and ACT score of 17 or higher requirement. The award, established in 2014, covers full tuition and textbook costs at any city college regardless of citizenship status.

Some, like Camila, who received nearly a full scholarship to attend a private university near Chicago, can manage without government aid, but many cannot clear such a high bar. The native Honduran says her dream is to become a high school math teacher: “That was my language, you know?” she says. “I didn’t come here speaking English, so my way to express myself was through math. Because it’s something I’m good at.”

And yet Camila knows her work is not finished. She currently works up to 25 hours a week at a grocery store on top of taking an Advanced Placement class and two “dual credit” classes (which allow her to get college credit for the classes she takes now). Second semester junior year, she worked almost full-time.

She says her friends often ask her, “How do you do it?” But Camila persevered, knowing she could not squander a chance to attend college.

“I chose to start my job junior year because I started thinking about today,” she says. “Knowing that I’ve made it this far—that’s something to be proud of.”

Vargas says one trait is shared among all her Dreamers: resilience.

“To be that age and to have all that against you and still face every day is hard work,” Vargas says. “They’re fighters.”

It’s been especially tough for this class of seniors, who nursed their college dreams in the shadow of Trump’s anti-immigrant presidential campaign. Fuentes remembers students from the previous year were more fiery and open to exposing their non-citizenship status, embodying a “hope that all was possible,” he says.

This year, it’s different. President Trump has called for more aggressive immigration enforcement, and people previously protected by the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (sometimes known as Dreamers) have reportedly been detained. (Just last week, Trump walked back his campaign promise to “immediately terminate” DACA.) Students have been more secretive about their immigration status, Vargas says, perhaps because they realize silence could mean protection not only for them but also for their parents, who have no equivalent of DACA and could be deported any time.

The day after the election, North-Grand’s Dreamer’s Club held an emergency meeting after school, in which undocumented students gathered in a classroom to process their newfound fears.

Vargas says among the anxieties expressed, students asked, “What’s going to happen now? Should I be scared? Are my parents going to be sent away?”

For now, North-Grand’s undocumented students believe they can still make it in the U.S.

“Trump’s election day, it really hurt me—feeling like I could [be sent] away,” Andrés says. “Now I want to do something just to prove them wrong. … You want to say that Mexico is sending its bad people? Look at me.”

Andrés and Isabel have accepted they will not walk the same path as other seniors with the same bonafides. The two of them are both lifeguarding at their schools on the weekends, saving up money to transfer from the city college system to their dream schools in two years.

A couple of weeks before the college decision ceremony, Andrés’s friend told him he had officially committed to the dream school that had accepted the both of them: “I’m going to go to [the university] for the both of us,” he said. “Because I know how much you wanted to go.”

So Andrés made a promise. He said he would spend the next two years taking general education courses and accruing savings from his job—until he had enough money to attend without government aid.

“I’m not going to think about what could have been,” he says. “I’m going to focus on what’s going to happen and I’ll take it from there.”

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India’s top IIT has an unusual solution to tackle student depression: Turn off the power

One of India’s best engineering colleges is working to prevent student suicides by pulling them out of loneliness and depression. The Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur, wants students to interact more with each other instead of living cocooned lives on campus. And to nudge them towards this, hostel authorities simply switch off the power in the evenings.

Every evening, an hour of blackout is imposed in the hostels so that the occupants come out of their rooms, leaving behind their laptops and the internet, at least briefly, and bond with their peers.

“Once the lights are turned off, all the students are expected to come out of their room. Normally those students who spend maximum time in their room and do not interact with others, they are also forced to come out of their room and mingle with others,” Manish Bhattacharya, dean, students affairs at IIT Kharagpur, told Quartz in an email.

This is expected to create a healthy social life on campus to potentially tackle depression, which intensifies with seclusion. Such depression, along with academic pressure, is said to be a major cause for instances of student suicide in India.

In 2015 alone (the latest year for which official data is available), 8,934 students committed suicide in the country, according to the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB). About 2.8% of these incidents were at the graduate education level, which includes IIT students.

Every year, hundreds of thousands of students compete for a handful of seats at these premier engineering colleges. This intense competition continues even after securing seats, given that the IITs attract some of the most lucrative job offers in India. In addition, many students find it difficult to get used to life in a new town and handle responsibilities by themselves without support from family or friends. While most students fight the problems, a few wilt under pressure and commit suicide. At IIT-Kharagpur, two students committed suicide earlier this year. Other top institutes, too, have lost students to depression and stress.

Like the blackout project, IITs across the country have taken measures to tackle this depression, setting up creative centres for students to dance, sing, and play musical instruments or organising tree hugging sessions. The IITs also have counselling centres.

At Kharagpur, the students appear to be enjoying the “lights off” initiative, and more such activities are in the works.

The Rekhi Centre of Excellence for the Science of Happiness, the institute’s initiative to promote students’ well being, is helping out, too. It offers various courses, hosts regular workshops, and organises talks by researchers in the field.

“We hope that the courses will give them (students) deep insights into the theory and practice of happiness,” Priyadarshi Patnaik, faculty coordinator for the Rekhi Centre, said.