At Colleges, Demographic Changes Everywhere but the Top – The …

As colleges grapple with these challenges, the survey offers a snapshot of the leaders in higher education: who the current presidents are, how they got there, how they spend their time and what they think the future holds.

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More and more, the presidents are having to deal with change on campus and off.

“Pressures to transform colleges and universities have grown, making the job of being president harder,” the report says. “Higher education has reached an inflection point as the student body diversifies, enrollments plateau, funding volatility grows, accountability and political climates become more intense and tumultuous.”

In the New York area, the top ranks in academia have been reshuffled recently, with a host of institutions turning to new presidents, including New York University (where Andrew Hamilton took over in 2016), Pace University, the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Vassar College and Barnard College. The State University of New York named a new chancellor in April. The City College of New York, whose president resigned in October amid a scandal, is still searching for a replacement.

To complete the survey, the council solicited input from more than 3,600 presidents last year. More than 1,500 responded to a 69-question survey, representing 60 percent of universities granting doctorates or master’s degrees. The survey also sought data from for-profit institutions, but only 31 — about 6 percent — replied.

Over all, the study found that 30 percent of college presidents were women and 17 percent were members of racial or ethnic minorities — a slight increase from recent surveys. One group that slipped, however, was Hispanics, and especially Hispanic women; while 6.7 percent of college presidents identified as Hispanic women in 2006, the figure in 2016 was 2.9 percent.

But with the percentage of college students who are white continuing to decline — they now make up 58 percent of the college population, according to the National Center for Education Statistics — college presidents overwhelmingly agree that the racial climate on campus has become more important: 56 percent cited the issue as more of a priority than four years ago; 1 percent said it was less of one. Almost half of the presidents, in fact, said they were trying to attract female and minority faculty members to better reflect the population.

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“While we would like to see numbers reflect more progress in certain areas,” Molly Corbett Broad, the council’s president, said during a conference call Monday, “I do believe that the needle is slowly moving in the right direction.”

When asked how they gauged success, presidents cited retention rates, graduation rates and minority student outcomes as the most legitimate indicators. Few cited popular rankings, such as the popular lists produced by U.S. News World Report.

When asked to identify their top concerns, more than three-fifths of respondents said “never enough money.” Roughly the same number said they devoted most of their days to budgeting and financial management issues, as well as fund-raising.

Then again, when the presidents were asked to name the areas in which they felt they were unprepared for the job, the biggest response — at 28 percent — was fund-raising.

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For a peek into what frustrated them the most, presidents were asked to rank the constituents who least appreciated the challenges they faced. Topping the list were state legislators (40 percent), the news media (31 percent) and their governor’s offices (29 percent).

From 2008 to 2016, public funding for public higher education in New York State declined by 6 percent while tuition climbed by 32 percent, according to a report last year from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has since instituted the Excelsior Scholarship program, which makes tuition at the state’s two-year and four-year public colleges free for those who meet certain income requirements.

Still, Jonathan Gagliardi, associate director of the council’s Center for Policy Research and Strategy, said he was surprised by “the level to which presidents felt some hostility in their state political climate.”

More than half of those questioned expect to leave their current post within five years.

The average age of presidents is now 62, the survey found, or a decade older than the 1986 figure. The percentage of presidents over 71 increased to 11 percent, from 5 percent.

The percentage of presidents age 50 or younger has dropped to 10 percent, from 42 percent in 1986, indicating that more experienced administrators are now in higher demand. Small wonder, then, that the average presidential stint has gradually shortened and is now six and a half years.


Continue reading the main story

At Colleges, Demographic Changes Everywhere but the Top

As colleges grapple with these challenges, the survey offers a snapshot of the leaders in higher education: who the current presidents are, how they got there, how they spend their time and what they think the future holds.

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

More and more, the presidents are having to deal with change on campus and off.

“Pressures to transform colleges and universities have grown, making the job of being president harder,” the report says. “Higher education has reached an inflection point as the student body diversifies, enrollments plateau, funding volatility grows, accountability and political climates become more intense and tumultuous.”

In the New York area, the top ranks in academia have been reshuffled recently, with a host of institutions turning to new presidents, including New York University (where Andrew Hamilton took over in 2016), Pace University, the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Vassar College and Barnard College. The State University of New York named a new chancellor in April. The City College of New York, whose president resigned in October amid a scandal, is still searching for a replacement.

To complete the survey, the council solicited input from more than 3,600 presidents last year. More than 1,500 responded to a 69-question survey, representing 60 percent of universities granting doctorates or master’s degrees. The survey also sought data from for-profit institutions, but only 31 — about 6 percent — replied.

Over all, the study found that 30 percent of college presidents were women and 17 percent were members of racial or ethnic minorities — a slight increase from recent surveys. One group that slipped, however, was Hispanics, and especially Hispanic women; while 6.7 percent of college presidents identified as Hispanic women in 2006, the figure in 2016 was 2.9 percent.

But with the percentage of college students who are white continuing to decline — they now make up 58 percent of the college population, according to the National Center for Education Statistics — college presidents overwhelmingly agree that the racial climate on campus has become more important: 56 percent cited the issue as more of a priority than four years ago; 1 percent said it was less of one. Almost half of the presidents, in fact, said they were trying to attract female and minority faculty members to better reflect the population.

Newsletter Sign Up

Continue reading the main story

“While we would like to see numbers reflect more progress in certain areas,” Molly Corbett Broad, the council’s president, said during a conference call Monday, “I do believe that the needle is slowly moving in the right direction.”

When asked how they gauged success, presidents cited retention rates, graduation rates and minority student outcomes as the most legitimate indicators. Few cited popular rankings, such as the popular lists produced by U.S. News World Report.

When asked to identify their top concerns, more than three-fifths of respondents said “never enough money.” Roughly the same number said they devoted most of their days to budgeting and financial management issues, as well as fund-raising.

Then again, when the presidents were asked to name the areas in which they felt they were unprepared for the job, the biggest response — at 28 percent — was fund-raising.

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

For a peek into what frustrated them the most, presidents were asked to rank the constituents who least appreciated the challenges they faced. Topping the list were state legislators (40 percent), the news media (31 percent) and their governor’s offices (29 percent).

From 2008 to 2016, public funding for public higher education in New York State declined by 6 percent while tuition climbed by 32 percent, according to a report last year from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has since instituted the Excelsior Scholarship program, which makes tuition at the state’s two-year and four-year public colleges free for those who meet certain income requirements.

Still, Jonathan Gagliardi, associate director of the council’s Center for Policy Research and Strategy, said he was surprised by “the level to which presidents felt some hostility in their state political climate.”

More than half of those questioned expect to leave their current post within five years.

The average age of presidents is now 62, the survey found, or a decade older than the 1986 figure. The percentage of presidents over 71 increased to 11 percent, from 5 percent.

The percentage of presidents age 50 or younger has dropped to 10 percent, from 42 percent in 1986, indicating that more experienced administrators are now in higher demand. Small wonder, then, that the average presidential stint has gradually shortened and is now six and a half years.


Continue reading the main story

The Top 30 Two-Year Trade Schools: Colleges That Fight The …

Courtesy of Edward Molek, PIA

The Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics lands as the No. 11 Two-Year Trade School and is the top school on the list for technical trades.

“I can think of nine magazines off the top of my head who every year will rank the top colleges. None of them ever include a trade school.”

And so began a scathing critique of college rankings and the country’s attitude toward higher education by Mike Rowe, the Dirty Jobs and Somebody’s Gotta Do It television personality and social activist. As part of an interview with ATTN:, Rowe spoke about the benefits of choosing trade schools over academia, from affordable tuition to the availability of jobs in the field.

He has a point.

The Forbes Top Colleges rankings includes over 650 four-year U.S. colleges and universities. We measure return on investment, giving colleges credit for low student debt, high graduation rates and alumni with enviable career success and salaries. This is all based on a single premise: An undergraduate education matters.

And the overall numbers bear this out.  For example, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the difference in median weekly earnings between workers with a bachelor’s degree ($1,156) and those with an associate’s degree ($819) was over 41% in 2016. The average salary for trade school graduates eight years into their careers was about $23,400, whereas the national average for college graduates is $33,500, according to the Department of Education’s College Scorecard, which tracks recipients of financial aid

But just as with four-year colleges, not all trade schools are equal. Because of a confluence of factors – ranging from area of study to workforce needs to close-knit learning environments – some trade schools are even better options than their bachelor’s-bequeathing counterparts.

For the first time, Forbes has put together a comprehensive ranking of two-year trade schools. Using the same “return on investment” focus as our annual Top Colleges report, this list of 30 looks at three critical data points: earnings, affordability and quality. Full methodology can be found here.

See Full List Of Top 30 Trade Schools Below

The Two-Year Advantage: Nursing Technicians

No trade schools embody the two-year advantage better than what the Carnegie Classification of Institutions refers to as “Special Focus Two-Year: Health Professions” institutions. Put plainly, nursing schools. According to Payscale, the largest online salary database, an associate’s degree in nursing will get you paid quickly, and with a $52,500 early career median salary, the degree ranks third for pay among associates degrees -– and higher than 75% of four-year majors. The graduates of four nursing schools – including those of St Paul’s School of Nursing-Queens, our top-ranked trade school – make over $74,000 annually six years after college, more than double the national average for students from all higher education intuitions according to the College Scorecard.

This success makes sense, as the nursing trade is projected to grow even more in the coming years. Between 2014 and 2024, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that over 700,000 jobs will have been added in the occupations of registered nurses (439,300 jobs) and nursing assistants (262,000).

How about the technical trades? On its surface, the prospects for the job market look to be the victims of automation, with an estimated 282,100 jobs eliminated in production fields by 2024. Yet even with this massive shrinkage, there will still be approximately 9 million jobs in production, and for many jobs such as aircraft technicians, the lack of growth will not mean a lack of available jobs.

“We just had a career fair here in Pittsburgh maybe four, five months ago, and we had more companies sign up to attend than we have graduating students,” says Steve Sabold, the director of admissions for the Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics. A two-year technical school founded in 1929 (Orville Wright’s company had a hand in its founding), PIA houses programs in aviation maintenance and aviation electronics.

There will only be 1,600 more aircraft mechanics and service technicians in 2024 than there were in 2014, but with over 30,000 job openings over that time, schools like PIA are poised to hook students up with available and fine-paying jobs. This is the story across the industry: although hundreds of thousands of jobs will be cut, there will have been over 2.2 million job openings by 2024. Welders, cutters, solderers and brazers – jobs that are as technical as they get – alone will have experienced 128,500 job openings and 14,400 jobs created according to the BLS.

Meeting the Skills Gap

Whether this plenitude of jobs is filled, however, is contingent on people getting the right training for them.

“There is no question that there’s a skills gap in the United States,” says Jay Moon, the president of the Mississippi Manufacturer’s Association, which represents 2400 workers. “We have jobs that are not being filled right now because [workers] don’t have the skillset.”

Enrollment at two-year schools – the source of job training for many of these trades – went down every year from 2010 to 2014, resulting in almost a million fewer students. Trends like these mean trouble for many industries. The National Association of Manufacturers, of which the Mississippi Manufacturer’s Association is a part, estimates that of the 3.2 million manufacturing jobs needed over the next decade, 2 million will go unfilled. Sabold shared a similar concern: according to Aircraft Maintenance Technology magazine, while 35% of aircraft technicians were over the age of 50, only 5% were below 30.

“I know when I grew up, everybody pounded into me ‘Your-year, four-year, four-year. You need to have four years.’ My guidance counselors, my parents, everybody,” Sabold says. “The entire aviation industry is encountering a problem, and that is the shortage that there, not only in the aviation industry, but in the quantity of individuals interested in getting into a skilled trade field.

Moon, who served as the chairman of the State Workforce Investment Board in Mississippi, believes that getting the right training can situate students to launch the careers that are available now. And for those who are discouraged by job market projections– he believes the growth of robotics 3D printing and autonomous cars will continue to disrupt many industries – Moon says that the skills taught in two-year community and specialized colleges won’t be obsolete.

“Because of the nature of these disruptive technologies, it’s somewhat difficult to predict exactly what are going to be the skillset demands in the future,” Moon says. ”What a lot of community colleges and training groups are doing is looking at cross-cutting skillsets. If you know that more technology is going to be utilized out in the manufacturing environment, then those people who can work with and keep the machines running, whether it’s robotics or other kinds of machines used in a manufacturing environment… can use those skills in more than one location, more than one type of business.”

There is no catch-all school setting that will guarantee everybody a job, and trade schools are not the most fitting or lucrative option for everybody. However, the nation needs nurses, mechanics and welders, and two-year specialized schools are a prime way to build a bigger, better workforce.

And so, with regards to Mr. Rowe, here is the inaugural list of FORBES’ Top 25 Two-Year Trade Schools:

Full methodology can be found here.

  1. St Paul’s School of Nursing-Queens

Location: Rego Park, NY

Early career salary: $75,800

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

For-profit

  1. Los Angeles County College of Nursing and Allied Health

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Early career salary: $87,200

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Saint Elizabeth College of Nursing

Location: Utica, NY

Early career salary: $56,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. St Joseph’s College of Nursing at St Joseph’s Hospital Health Center

Location: Syracuse, NY

Early career salary: $57,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Belanger School of Nursing

Location: Schenectady, NY

Early career salary: $60,200

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Lawrence Memorial Hospital School of Nursing

Location: Medford, MA

Early career salary: $59,000

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Southeast Missouri Hospital College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Location: Cape Girardeau, MO

Early career salary: $49,000

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Riverside College of Health Careers

Location: Newport News, VA

Early career salary: $52,500

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Cochran School of Nursing

Location: Yonkers, NY

Early career salary: $86,000

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Pomeroy College of Nursing at Crouse Hospital

Location: Syracuse, NY

Early career salary: $53,700

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics

Location: West Mifflin, PA

Early career salary: $52,900

Most popular area of study: Transportation and Materials Moving

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Island Drafting and Technical Institute

Location: Amityville, NY

Early career salary: $42,900

Most popular area of study: Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields

For-profit

  1. Triangle Tech Inc-Greensburg

Location: Greensburg, PA

Early career salary: $42,900

Most popular area of study: Construction Trades

For-profit

  1. Carolinas College of Health Sciences

Location: Charlotte, NC

Early career salary: $47,500

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Maine College of Health Professions

Location: Lewiston, ME

Early career salary: $50,700

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Memorial College of Nursing

Location: Albany, NY

Early career salary: $45,400

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Triangle Tech Inc-Bethlehem

Location: Bethlehem, PA

Early career salary: $42,900

Most popular area of study: Construction Trades

For-profit

  1. Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing

Location: Troy, NY

Early career salary: $45,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Morrison Institute of Technology

Location: Morrison, IL

Early career salary: $43,900

Most popular area of study: Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields

Private, not-for-profit

  1. West Coast Ultrasound Institute

Location: Beverly Hills, CA

Early career salary: $50,100

Most popular area of study: Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians

For-profit

  1. Wyotech-Laramie

Location: Laramie, WY

Early career salary: $42,500

Most popular area of study: Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians

For-profit

  1. St Joseph School of Nursing

Location: Nashua, NH

Early career salary: $41,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Wyo Tech-Blairsville

Location: Blairsville, PA

Early career salary: $42,500

Most popular area of study: Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians

For-profit

  1. ITI Technical College

Location: Laramie, WY

Early career salary: $46,100

Most popular area of study: Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields

For-profit

  1. St Paul’s School of Nursing-Staten Island

Location: Staten Island, NY

Early career salary: $74,800

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

For-profit

  1. Lancaster County Career and Technology Center

Location: Willow Street, PA

Early career salary: $36,200

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture

Location: Curtis, NE

Early career salary: $43,500

Most popular area of study: Agriculture, Agriculture Operations, and Related Sciences

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Colorado School of Trades

Location: Lakewood, CO

Early career salary: $35,400

Most popular area of study: Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians

For-profit

  1. AVTEC-Alaska’s Institute of Technology

Location: Seward, AK

Early career salary: $33,500

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Concorde Career College-Garden Grove

Location: Garden Grove, CA

Early career salary: $36,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

For-profit

The Top 30 Two-Year Trade Schools: Colleges That Fight The Nation’s Skills Gap

Courtesy of Edward Molek, PIA

The Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics lands as the No. 11 Two-Year Trade School and is the top school on the list for technical trades.

“I can think of nine magazines off the top of my head who every year will rank the top colleges. None of them ever include a trade school.”

And so began a scathing critique of college rankings and the country’s attitude toward higher education by Mike Rowe, the Dirty Jobs and Somebody’s Gotta Do It television personality and social activist. As part of an interview with ATTN:, Rowe spoke about the benefits of choosing trade schools over academia, from affordable tuition to the availability of jobs in the field.

He has a point.

The Forbes Top Colleges rankings includes over 650 four-year U.S. colleges and universities. We measure return on investment, giving colleges credit for low student debt, high graduation rates and alumni with enviable career success and salaries. This is all based on a single premise: An undergraduate education matters.

And the overall numbers bear this out.  For example, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the difference in median weekly earnings between workers with a bachelor’s degree ($1,156) and those with an associate’s degree ($819) was over 41% in 2016. The average salary for trade school graduates eight years into their careers was about $23,400, whereas the national average for college graduates is $33,500, according to the Department of Education’s College Scorecard, which tracks recipients of financial aid

But just as with four-year colleges, not all trade schools are equal. Because of a confluence of factors – ranging from area of study to workforce needs to close-knit learning environments – some trade schools are even better options than their bachelor’s-bequeathing counterparts.

For the first time, Forbes has put together a comprehensive ranking of two-year trade schools. Using the same “return on investment” focus as our annual Top Colleges report, this list of 30 looks at three critical data points: earnings, affordability and quality. Full methodology can be found here.

See Full List Of Top 30 Trade Schools Below

The Two-Year Advantage: Nursing Technicians

No trade schools embody the two-year advantage better than what the Carnegie Classification of Institutions refers to as “Special Focus Two-Year: Health Professions” institutions. Put plainly, nursing schools. According to Payscale, the largest online salary database, an associate’s degree in nursing will get you paid quickly, and with a $52,500 early career median salary, the degree ranks third for pay among associates degrees -– and higher than 75% of four-year majors. The graduates of four nursing schools – including those of St Paul’s School of Nursing-Queens, our top-ranked trade school – make over $74,000 annually six years after college, more than double the national average for students from all higher education intuitions according to the College Scorecard.

This success makes sense, as the nursing trade is projected to grow even more in the coming years. Between 2014 and 2024, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that over 700,000 jobs will have been added in the occupations of registered nurses (439,300 jobs) and nursing assistants (262,000).

How about the technical trades? On its surface, the prospects for the job market look to be the victims of automation, with an estimated 282,100 jobs eliminated in production fields by 2024. Yet even with this massive shrinkage, there will still be approximately 9 million jobs in production, and for many jobs such as aircraft technicians, the lack of growth will not mean a lack of available jobs.

“We just had a career fair here in Pittsburgh maybe four, five months ago, and we had more companies sign up to attend than we have graduating students,” says Steve Sabold, the director of admissions for the Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics. A two-year technical school founded in 1929 (Orville Wright’s company had a hand in its founding), PIA houses programs in aviation maintenance and aviation electronics.

There will only be 1,600 more aircraft mechanics and service technicians in 2024 than there were in 2014, but with over 30,000 job openings over that time, schools like PIA are poised to hook students up with available and fine-paying jobs. This is the story across the industry: although hundreds of thousands of jobs will be cut, there will have been over 2.2 million job openings by 2024. Welders, cutters, solderers and brazers – jobs that are as technical as they get – alone will have experienced 128,500 job openings and 14,400 jobs created according to the BLS.

Meeting the Skills Gap

Whether this plenitude of jobs is filled, however, is contingent on people getting the right training for them.

“There is no question that there’s a skills gap in the United States,” says Jay Moon, the president of the Mississippi Manufacturer’s Association, which represents 2400 workers. “We have jobs that are not being filled right now because [workers] don’t have the skillset.”

Enrollment at two-year schools – the source of job training for many of these trades – went down every year from 2010 to 2014, resulting in almost a million fewer students. Trends like these mean trouble for many industries. The National Association of Manufacturers, of which the Mississippi Manufacturer’s Association is a part, estimates that of the 3.2 million manufacturing jobs needed over the next decade, 2 million will go unfilled. Sabold shared a similar concern: according to Aircraft Maintenance Technology magazine, while 35% of aircraft technicians were over the age of 50, only 5% were below 30.

“I know when I grew up, everybody pounded into me ‘Your-year, four-year, four-year. You need to have four years.’ My guidance counselors, my parents, everybody,” Sabold says. “The entire aviation industry is encountering a problem, and that is the shortage that there, not only in the aviation industry, but in the quantity of individuals interested in getting into a skilled trade field.

Moon, who served as the chairman of the State Workforce Investment Board in Mississippi, believes that getting the right training can situate students to launch the careers that are available now. And for those who are discouraged by job market projections– he believes the growth of robotics 3D printing and autonomous cars will continue to disrupt many industries – Moon says that the skills taught in two-year community and specialized colleges won’t be obsolete.

“Because of the nature of these disruptive technologies, it’s somewhat difficult to predict exactly what are going to be the skillset demands in the future,” Moon says. ”What a lot of community colleges and training groups are doing is looking at cross-cutting skillsets. If you know that more technology is going to be utilized out in the manufacturing environment, then those people who can work with and keep the machines running, whether it’s robotics or other kinds of machines used in a manufacturing environment… can use those skills in more than one location, more than one type of business.”

There is no catch-all school setting that will guarantee everybody a job, and trade schools are not the most fitting or lucrative option for everybody. However, the nation needs nurses, mechanics and welders, and two-year specialized schools are a prime way to build a bigger, better workforce.

And so, with regards to Mr. Rowe, here is the inaugural list of FORBES’ Top 25 Two-Year Trade Schools:

Full methodology can be found here.

  1. St Paul’s School of Nursing-Queens

Location: Rego Park, NY

Early career salary: $75,800

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

For-profit

  1. Los Angeles County College of Nursing and Allied Health

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Early career salary: $87,200

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Saint Elizabeth College of Nursing

Location: Utica, NY

Early career salary: $56,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. St Joseph’s College of Nursing at St Joseph’s Hospital Health Center

Location: Syracuse, NY

Early career salary: $57,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Belanger School of Nursing

Location: Schenectady, NY

Early career salary: $60,200

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Lawrence Memorial Hospital School of Nursing

Location: Medford, MA

Early career salary: $59,000

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Southeast Missouri Hospital College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Location: Cape Girardeau, MO

Early career salary: $49,000

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Riverside College of Health Careers

Location: Newport News, VA

Early career salary: $52,500

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Cochran School of Nursing

Location: Yonkers, NY

Early career salary: $86,000

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Pomeroy College of Nursing at Crouse Hospital

Location: Syracuse, NY

Early career salary: $53,700

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics

Location: West Mifflin, PA

Early career salary: $52,900

Most popular area of study: Transportation and Materials Moving

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Island Drafting and Technical Institute

Location: Amityville, NY

Early career salary: $42,900

Most popular area of study: Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields

For-profit

  1. Triangle Tech Inc-Greensburg

Location: Greensburg, PA

Early career salary: $42,900

Most popular area of study: Construction Trades

For-profit

  1. Carolinas College of Health Sciences

Location: Charlotte, NC

Early career salary: $47,500

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Maine College of Health Professions

Location: Lewiston, ME

Early career salary: $50,700

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Memorial College of Nursing

Location: Albany, NY

Early career salary: $45,400

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Triangle Tech Inc-Bethlehem

Location: Bethlehem, PA

Early career salary: $42,900

Most popular area of study: Construction Trades

For-profit

  1. Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing

Location: Troy, NY

Early career salary: $45,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Morrison Institute of Technology

Location: Morrison, IL

Early career salary: $43,900

Most popular area of study: Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields

Private, not-for-profit

  1. West Coast Ultrasound Institute

Location: Beverly Hills, CA

Early career salary: $50,100

Most popular area of study: Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians

For-profit

  1. Wyotech-Laramie

Location: Laramie, WY

Early career salary: $42,500

Most popular area of study: Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians

For-profit

  1. St Joseph School of Nursing

Location: Nashua, NH

Early career salary: $41,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Private, not-for-profit

  1. Wyo Tech-Blairsville

Location: Blairsville, PA

Early career salary: $42,500

Most popular area of study: Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians

For-profit

  1. ITI Technical College

Location: Laramie, WY

Early career salary: $46,100

Most popular area of study: Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields

For-profit

  1. St Paul’s School of Nursing-Staten Island

Location: Staten Island, NY

Early career salary: $74,800

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

For-profit

  1. Lancaster County Career and Technology Center

Location: Willow Street, PA

Early career salary: $36,200

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture

Location: Curtis, NE

Early career salary: $43,500

Most popular area of study: Agriculture, Agriculture Operations, and Related Sciences

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Colorado School of Trades

Location: Lakewood, CO

Early career salary: $35,400

Most popular area of study: Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians

For-profit

  1. AVTEC-Alaska’s Institute of Technology

Location: Seward, AK

Early career salary: $33,500

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

Public, not-for-profit

  1. Concorde Career College-Garden Grove

Location: Garden Grove, CA

Early career salary: $36,600

Most popular area of study: Health Professions and Related Programs

For-profit

College savings top of mind as school year ends

As I sat through the annual year-end awards ceremony at my daughter’s high school this past week and saw the enthusiastic smiles on the faces of all of the graduating seniors heading off to college in the fall, my mind pictured a group of proud but worried parents wondering how they are going to cover the tuition bills that will be in their mailboxes in a few short weeks.

While I expect each graduate’s family at least has a plan in place to cover their children’s first year expenses, the reality is that only about 40 percent of families created such a plan before their child enrolled in college according to Sallie Mae’s 2016 report How America Pays for College.

This report also noted 29 percent of families felt significant stress about how to fund their child’s college degree, but these concerns were much lower among families who had created a college funding plan well ahead of time. Nearly half of families who had a plan in place reported they were rarely or never stressed about covering college costs, most likely because they also reported having a much larger amount of savings in place than families without a plan, reducing their need to rely on student or parent loans. Families who planned saved 3.5 times more than non-planners and borrowed a third less to cover college expenses.

Most parents are keenly aware college is expensive and that the cost of a degree has been rising rapidly. The good news, however, is there are several ways families can keep these costs under control and alleviate the financial stress that comes with them. For one, there are plenty of colleges out there competing for students, so it should be possible to find a reasonably affordable option that offers the student’s desired academic program. Opting for an in-state, public university over a private college can significantly reduce the price tag. But eliminating private universities solely based on their published tuition rates can be a mistake because these schools often grant financial aid awards that bring their tuition and fees in-line with public schools. For the average family, such scholarships and grants cover about 34 percent of the total college expense, with parent savings and income covering 29 percent, and the remainder being funded from borrowing (20 percent), student savings and income (12 percent), and relatives and friends (5 percent), according to Sallie Mae.

Given parent resources will likely need to bear much of the weight of college bills, those who start a college savings plan early will have a much easier time managing cash flow during the college years. Even small amounts saved and invested monthly over the 18 years before a newborn goes off to college will go a long way. Still, the prospect of setting aside enough to pay cash for what could be a $200,000 to $300,000 expense in the future for a four-year degree, even at a public university, can be so intimidating that it discourages parents from saving at all. What the Sallie Mae study data tell us, however, is that parents need not set such a lofty savings goal. Instead, they can reasonably factor in other sources of college funding (parent income, student income, scholarships, and loans), to come up with a more manageable savings target.

To help parents devise and track a savings plan along these lines, Fidelity Investments developed a simple college savings calculator (www.fidelity.com/misc/college-savings/college_savings.html) that figures the monthly savings needed based on a child’s age, estimated annual college costs, and amount to be funded from savings. With this tool, parents can easily change the cost and other inputs to come up with a plan that is both reasonable relative to the projected expenses and one that they can stick to. For example, a family that expects to cover 10 percent of the cost from their income might set a goal of funding 35 percent from savings and the rest from other sources. Using the average cost for a private university to be conservative, this family would want to start setting aside $290 monthly for their newborn’s college fund. If that figure does not easily fit into their budget, the goal can be modified to reduce the savings target with the intent to revisit the calculation and increase the savings amount periodically to get the savings plan on track.  

David T. Mayes is a Certified Financial Planner professional and IRS Enrolled Agent at Bearing Point Wealth Partners, Inc., a fiduciary financial planning firm in Hampton. He can be reached at (603) 926-1775 or david.mayes@bearingpointwealth.com.

Best in Texas stadiums: Can anyone offer a college football experience like the Aggies’ Kyle Field does?

The 12th Man shows up and shows up loud at Texas AM’s College Station football palace. But how does the Kyle Field experience compare to the Longhorns’ #TurnUpDKR efforts? And where do Baylor’s McLane stadium, TCU’s Amon G. Carter fall in?

SportsDay’s college bloggers went to work finding out which Texas colleges offer the best football atmospheres. Texas AM pulled ahead after splitting first-place votes with Texas, and answers varied. Check out below to see how your team’s uniforms stack up.

A recap of the voting process: On their ballots, writers cast one vote per team ranking them from best to worst. The top team in their individual polls receives 12 points, the second team receives 11 points, the third gets 10 points, etc. This year’s voters: Kacey Bowen, Adam Grosbard, EJ Holland, Carter Karels, Ezra Siegel, Brandon Soliz, Brett Vito and Brady Vardeman. 

Don’t forget to vote for your favorite stadiums by clicking here or scrolling to the end of the post!

1) Texas AM’s Kyle Field, 93 (7)

Third NSF Community College Innovation Challenge rewards top …


News Release 17-053

Judges recognize projects that slow antibiotic resistance and enhance STEM education

Superbug! First place awardee, Del Mar College, develops alternatives to conventional antibiotics.
Credit and Larger Version

June 16, 2017

Teams from Texas and Colorado received first and second place awards, respectively, in the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Community College Innovation Challenge (CCIC).

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) co-sponsors the annual event, which fosters students’ interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers by asking them to offer creative solutions to real-world problems.

This year, CCIC had students propose solutions to issues focusing on three themes: Maker to Manufacturer, Energy and Environment and Security Technologies.

“Our role as an agency is to fund trailblazers with curiosity-driven ideas,” said NSF acting Chief Operating Officer Joan Ferrini-Mundy at a Wednesday Capitol Hill reception, where students showcased their projects. “We know that community colleges are rich resources for the skilled technical workforce and provide an environment where bright new ideas can thrive.”

A four-judge panel selected first place awardee Del Mar College for their proposed solution to a problem that affects about 2 million people each year in the United States: the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Their project, called “Slowing Antibiotic Resistance with EnteroSword,” promotes the use of tailor-made viruses that only infect and kill bacteria resistant to conventional antibiotic treatments.

Red Rocks Community College received second place for their project, “Cyber Lab Learning Environment,” which demonstrates how students can learn without fear in the safety of student-created cyber labs and develop real-world skills in response to real-world challenges. With print and digital materials, the cyber lab provides a real-world environment for advanced learning.

“These students exemplify innovation,” said AACC President and CEO, Walter G. Bumphus. “The finalists were impressive and inspiring and I commend the students, their faculty mentors and the industry partners for these exceptional concepts. I would like to congratulate the winning teams and thank them for illustrating how America’s community colleges provide learning opportunities that can change lives. We are proud of the Community College Innovation Challenge and our partnership with the National Science Foundation to highlight the amazing work of community colleges.”

Judges chose winners from 10 teams selected earlier this year as CCIC finalists. Each team consisted of three to five students, a faculty mentor and a community or industry partner. NSF announced the complete list of finalist teams in April.

Winners were selected following a four-day boot camp in Arlington, Virginia, and a reception on Capitol Hill where the students demonstrated their projects for members of Congress.

Thursday, teams made their final presentations, which were assessed by Cristina McGlew Castro, a senior manager at Cisco Systems; Steven McKnight, vice president for the National Capital Region at Virginia Tech; Susan Rundell Singer, provost at Rollins College; and Karen Trovato, co-Founder, Novel Reach, Inc.

“More than 40 percent of U.S. undergraduates are enrolled at community colleges,” said Jim Lewis, acting NSF assistant director for Education and Human Resources, which funds CCIC. “It’s important that we reach these students, many of whom are from communities underrepresented in STEM and encourage them to see themselves in STEM professions after graduation. This group of CCIC participants give us hope for continued excellence in the STEM workforce pipeline. Congratulations to everyone who entered.”

-NSF-

Media Contacts

Bobbie Mixon, NSF, (703) 292-8070, bmixon@nsf.gov

Martha Parham, American Association of Community Colleges, mparham@aacc.nche.edu

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2017, its budget is $7.5 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives more than 48,000 competitive proposals for funding and makes about 12,000 new funding awards.

 Get News Updates by Email 

Useful NSF Web Sites:

NSF Home Page: https://www.nsf.gov
NSF News: https://www.nsf.gov/news/
For the News Media: https://www.nsf.gov/news/newsroom.jsp
Science and Engineering Statistics: https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/
Awards Searches: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/

 

2017 #MyTopCollege Week One Update: CSUF Is Back Again, Otterbein Cracks Top 5

@Yaniitzaaa

Third NSF Community College Innovation Challenge rewards top entries


News Release 17-053

Judges recognize projects that slow antibiotic resistance and enhance STEM education

Superbug! First place awardee, Del Mar College, develops alternatives to conventional antibiotics.
Credit and Larger Version

June 16, 2017

Teams from Texas and Colorado received first and second place awards, respectively, in the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Community College Innovation Challenge (CCIC).

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) co-sponsors the annual event, which fosters students’ interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers by asking them to offer creative solutions to real-world problems.

This year, CCIC had students propose solutions to issues focusing on three themes: Maker to Manufacturer, Energy and Environment and Security Technologies.

“Our role as an agency is to fund trailblazers with curiosity-driven ideas,” said NSF acting Chief Operating Officer Joan Ferrini-Mundy at a Wednesday Capitol Hill reception, where students showcased their projects. “We know that community colleges are rich resources for the skilled technical workforce and provide an environment where bright new ideas can thrive.”

A four-judge panel selected first place awardee Del Mar College for their proposed solution to a problem that affects about 2 million people each year in the United States: the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Their project, called “Slowing Antibiotic Resistance with EnteroSword,” promotes the use of tailor-made viruses that only infect and kill bacteria resistant to conventional antibiotic treatments.

Red Rocks Community College received second place for their project, “Cyber Lab Learning Environment,” which demonstrates how students can learn without fear in the safety of student-created cyber labs and develop real-world skills in response to real-world challenges. With print and digital materials, the cyber lab provides a real-world environment for advanced learning.

“These students exemplify innovation,” said AACC President and CEO, Walter G. Bumphus. “The finalists were impressive and inspiring and I commend the students, their faculty mentors and the industry partners for these exceptional concepts. I would like to congratulate the winning teams and thank them for illustrating how America’s community colleges provide learning opportunities that can change lives. We are proud of the Community College Innovation Challenge and our partnership with the National Science Foundation to highlight the amazing work of community colleges.”

Judges chose winners from 10 teams selected earlier this year as CCIC finalists. Each team consisted of three to five students, a faculty mentor and a community or industry partner. NSF announced the complete list of finalist teams in April.

Winners were selected following a four-day boot camp in Arlington, Virginia, and a reception on Capitol Hill where the students demonstrated their projects for members of Congress.

Thursday, teams made their final presentations, which were assessed by Cristina McGlew Castro, a senior manager at Cisco Systems; Steven McKnight, vice president for the National Capital Region at Virginia Tech; Susan Rundell Singer, provost at Rollins College; and Karen Trovato, co-Founder, Novel Reach, Inc.

“More than 40 percent of U.S. undergraduates are enrolled at community colleges,” said Jim Lewis, acting NSF assistant director for Education and Human Resources, which funds CCIC. “It’s important that we reach these students, many of whom are from communities underrepresented in STEM and encourage them to see themselves in STEM professions after graduation. This group of CCIC participants give us hope for continued excellence in the STEM workforce pipeline. Congratulations to everyone who entered.”

-NSF-

Media Contacts

Bobbie Mixon, NSF, (703) 292-8070, bmixon@nsf.gov

Martha Parham, American Association of Community Colleges, mparham@aacc.nche.edu

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2017, its budget is $7.5 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives more than 48,000 competitive proposals for funding and makes about 12,000 new funding awards.

 Get News Updates by Email 

Useful NSF Web Sites:

NSF Home Page: https://www.nsf.gov
NSF News: https://www.nsf.gov/news/
For the News Media: https://www.nsf.gov/news/newsroom.jsp
Science and Engineering Statistics: https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/
Awards Searches: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/

 

Cut-offs For Admissions to Top Colleges Across India: Check Here

New Delhi: Results of the most state and national education boards are out and students are now making a beeline to choose a college of their choice.

Delhi University, however, has put a spanner in the works and postponed their first cut-off list to June 23.

Although the university had announced that it would release six cut-off lists, dates of only five have been announced so far. More cut-off lists would be announced depending on the vacancy.

After the first cut-off list is announced on June 23 evening, admissions would begin from the next day, a release from the office of the Delhi University registrar said. The dates for release of subsequent cut-off lists are July 1, July 7, July 13 and July 18.

But for students who don’t want to spend do not want to wait so long to choose a college to take admission or want a second option to be safe, there are other colleges in the country.

Here is a list of colleges that have released their cutoff lists where students can now take admission: