Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos Delivers on Promise of Year Round Pell and Increased Flexibility for Students

WASHINGTON—Today, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced Year Round Pell grants will be available to students beginning July 1, 2017. This policy change will ensure hundreds of thousands of college students have the resources needed to finish their coursework in a timeframe that meets their individual needs.

“This decision is about empowering students and giving them the flexibility and support needed to achieve their goals,” said Secretary DeVos. “Expanding access to the Pell program, so that students who need additional resources can graduate more quickly and with less debt, is the right thing to do.”

This change in the Federal Pell Grant Program will allow an eligible student to receive up to 150 percent of the student’s Federal Pell Grant Scheduled Award beginning with the 2017–2018 award year.

To be eligible for the additional Pell Grant funds, the student must be otherwise eligible to receive Pell Grant funds for the payment period and must be enrolled at least half-time. For a student who is eligible for the additional Pell Grant funds, the institution must pay the student all of the student’s eligible Pell Grant funds, up to 150 percent of the student’s Pell Grant Scheduled Award for the award year.

Unless the student has remaining eligibility from the 2016-2017 award year, the Department strongly recommends that institutions award Pell Grant funds for this summer out of the 2017-2018 award year since the additional funding will be available later in the year (e.g., spring or summer of 2018).

Although institutions have the flexibility to assign crossover payment periods to either of the relevant award years, the new law provides that an institution must make the assignment “as it determines is most beneficial to students.” Therefore, that decision should be based on what is in the best interest of the student and maximizes the student’s eligibility over the two award years.

For more information please see the Dear Colleague Letter on the Implementation of Year-Round Pell Grants by clicking here.

Charter Communications launches $1 million grant program to … – Jackson County Times

Stamford, CT— Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ: CHTR) announced the launch of its Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program, a philanthropic initiative designed to support nonprofit organizations that educate community members on the benefits of broadband and how to use it to improve their lives. The objective of the Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program is to provide digital education in the communities we serve through financial grants, PSAs, workshops and webinars to local nonprofit organizations.

“In an increasingly technology-driven world, the importance of digital education and access to adequate digital resources cannot be overstated,” said Rahman Khan, Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility for Charter Communications. “The Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program allows Charter to partner with community organizations across the country to help bridge the divide and provide communities in need with the tools to grow and prosper in the digital age.”

Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program Details and Eligibility:

Spectrum Digital Education grants will be awarded to nonprofit organizations that have programs focused on families and seniors who have historically been underrepresented in broadband services.

To be eligible for a grant, the organization must serve communities located in a Spectrum market and must be a U.S. nonprofit organization with 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status.

There is no cap on the number of grants awarded, however absent special circumstances grant awards will not exceed $50,000.

The grants are supported by an initial $1 million commitment from Charter Communications.

The grants are one-year nonrenewable awards.

Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program applications and program details will be available on responsibility.spectrum.com/digitaledgrant beginning June 15, 2017.

Applications will be available for download and accepted starting June 30, 2017.

The entry period opens on June 30, 2017 at 12:01 a.m. (EDT) and closes on August 11, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. (EDT).

Grant recipients will be notified by October 2017.

The latest news, resources and information regarding Charter Communications’ philanthropic initiatives and events, can be found at responsibility.spectrum.com.

More information about Charter can be found at charter.com.

Charter Communications launches $1 million grant program to support digital education – Jackson County Times

Stamford, CT— Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ: CHTR) announced the launch of its Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program, a philanthropic initiative designed to support nonprofit organizations that educate community members on the benefits of broadband and how to use it to improve their lives. The objective of the Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program is to provide digital education in the communities we serve through financial grants, PSAs, workshops and webinars to local nonprofit organizations.

“In an increasingly technology-driven world, the importance of digital education and access to adequate digital resources cannot be overstated,” said Rahman Khan, Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility for Charter Communications. “The Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program allows Charter to partner with community organizations across the country to help bridge the divide and provide communities in need with the tools to grow and prosper in the digital age.”

Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program Details and Eligibility:

Spectrum Digital Education grants will be awarded to nonprofit organizations that have programs focused on families and seniors who have historically been underrepresented in broadband services.

To be eligible for a grant, the organization must serve communities located in a Spectrum market and must be a U.S. nonprofit organization with 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status.

There is no cap on the number of grants awarded, however absent special circumstances grant awards will not exceed $50,000.

The grants are supported by an initial $1 million commitment from Charter Communications.

The grants are one-year nonrenewable awards.

Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program applications and program details will be available on responsibility.spectrum.com/digitaledgrant beginning June 15, 2017.

Applications will be available for download and accepted starting June 30, 2017.

The entry period opens on June 30, 2017 at 12:01 a.m. (EDT) and closes on August 11, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. (EDT).

Grant recipients will be notified by October 2017.

The latest news, resources and information regarding Charter Communications’ philanthropic initiatives and events, can be found at responsibility.spectrum.com.

More information about Charter can be found at charter.com.

Central Vermont elementary teachers awarded diversity education …

News Release — Montpelier Public Schools
June 19, 2017

Contact:
Emily Wrigley
802-225-8279

Educating for Equity
Central Vermont Elementary Teachers Awarded 2017 Diversity Education Grant

Monday, June 19, 2017 Montpelier, VT – Even as the school year is winding down, Union Elementary School (UES), Montpelier is gearing up its professional learning for the coming year. UES has been awarded an Honoring Diversity Grant from the Rowland Foundation to support a multi-session professional development series for PreK-4 teachers on the topic of “how to talk with children about race and racism,” for the 2017-18 school year. The Rowland Foundation is a Vermont-based educational non-profit that provides grants to teachers who are leaders in school innovation. The UES Parents Group is providing additional financial support for this training series.

The school-wide diversity initiative will allow UES teachers to examine their own privilege and implicit biases, talk with professional peers about race and racism, and lead conversations with children about race, difference, and diversity. “Only nine schools in Vermont received this diversity grant award,” said Montpelier School District Curriculum Technology Director Michael Martin, Ed.D. “We are thrilled with the project our UES teachers have developed to address equity. A deep understanding of cultural competency and implicit bias is more important than ever. This work is a critical part of our schools’ democratic mission.” Martin was a Rowland Foundation Fellow in 2009.

The UES team leading this work consists of first grade teacher Emily Wrigley and the district’s English Language Learning (ELL) teachers, Hannah Barden and Sylvia Fagin. “Because talking about diversity is sometimes, unfortunately, seen as primarily the role of the ELL teachers, we are excited a classroom teacher has taken the lead on this initiative,” said Sylvia Fagin. “Our aim is to equip all teachers with the skills and confidence to discuss race, racism and diversity with their teaching peers and their students.”

The professional project was the brainchild of Emily Wrigley, University of Vermont Teacher of the Year for the Montpelier school district in 2014. That same year she participated in a 9-week pilot course, entitled Talking with Children about Race and Racism, developed and led by the Peace and Justice Center, Burlington VT.

“I heard curiosity from my students about same and different, including skin color. For example, ‘Ms. Wrigley, I want to see the color of your skin right next to mine. Look, it’s freckly. Mine is the color of my Daddy’s coffee, that he likes to say is a little sweet and a little creamy’,” said Wrigley. “The opportunity to identify my own biases, discomforts, and confusions about race and racism prepared me to be curious, and routinely communicate with cultural comfort and intelligence among my students and their families. I’m excited our school was selected, and for the opportunity for my colleagues, our students, and greater community.”

The series will allow all UES educators the opportunity to systematically examine their classroom practices, reflect on their teaching in real time, and practice new language and skills within the framework of an intentional, supportive learning series. Rebecca Haslam, 2015 Vermont Teacher of the Year and founder of Seed the Way consulting in Burlington, VT, will facilitate the training series. The Union Elementary School Parents Group is providing additional financial support to this training series.

Central Vermont elementary teachers awarded diversity education grant

News Release — Montpelier Public Schools
June 19, 2017

Contact:
Emily Wrigley
802-225-8279

Educating for Equity
Central Vermont Elementary Teachers Awarded 2017 Diversity Education Grant

Monday, June 19, 2017 Montpelier, VT – Even as the school year is winding down, Union Elementary School (UES), Montpelier is gearing up its professional learning for the coming year. UES has been awarded an Honoring Diversity Grant from the Rowland Foundation to support a multi-session professional development series for PreK-4 teachers on the topic of “how to talk with children about race and racism,” for the 2017-18 school year. The Rowland Foundation is a Vermont-based educational non-profit that provides grants to teachers who are leaders in school innovation. The UES Parents Group is providing additional financial support for this training series.

The school-wide diversity initiative will allow UES teachers to examine their own privilege and implicit biases, talk with professional peers about race and racism, and lead conversations with children about race, difference, and diversity. “Only nine schools in Vermont received this diversity grant award,” said Montpelier School District Curriculum Technology Director Michael Martin, Ed.D. “We are thrilled with the project our UES teachers have developed to address equity. A deep understanding of cultural competency and implicit bias is more important than ever. This work is a critical part of our schools’ democratic mission.” Martin was a Rowland Foundation Fellow in 2009.

The UES team leading this work consists of first grade teacher Emily Wrigley and the district’s English Language Learning (ELL) teachers, Hannah Barden and Sylvia Fagin. “Because talking about diversity is sometimes, unfortunately, seen as primarily the role of the ELL teachers, we are excited a classroom teacher has taken the lead on this initiative,” said Sylvia Fagin. “Our aim is to equip all teachers with the skills and confidence to discuss race, racism and diversity with their teaching peers and their students.”

The professional project was the brainchild of Emily Wrigley, University of Vermont Teacher of the Year for the Montpelier school district in 2014. That same year she participated in a 9-week pilot course, entitled Talking with Children about Race and Racism, developed and led by the Peace and Justice Center, Burlington VT.

“I heard curiosity from my students about same and different, including skin color. For example, ‘Ms. Wrigley, I want to see the color of your skin right next to mine. Look, it’s freckly. Mine is the color of my Daddy’s coffee, that he likes to say is a little sweet and a little creamy’,” said Wrigley. “The opportunity to identify my own biases, discomforts, and confusions about race and racism prepared me to be curious, and routinely communicate with cultural comfort and intelligence among my students and their families. I’m excited our school was selected, and for the opportunity for my colleagues, our students, and greater community.”

The series will allow all UES educators the opportunity to systematically examine their classroom practices, reflect on their teaching in real time, and practice new language and skills within the framework of an intentional, supportive learning series. Rebecca Haslam, 2015 Vermont Teacher of the Year and founder of Seed the Way consulting in Burlington, VT, will facilitate the training series. The Union Elementary School Parents Group is providing additional financial support to this training series.

Year-round Pell Grants to be Available This Year


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by Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Pell Grants for low-income college students can now be used for summer studies.

The U.S. Education Department announced Monday that year-round Pell Grants will be available starting July 1, allowing students to take summer classes and graduate sooner.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos says the decision “is about empowering students and giving them the flexibility and support needed to achieve their goals.”

Pell Grants have traditionally been used to pay for a student’s fall and spring terms, but demand for a year-round option has grown as more students take summer courses.

Students enrolled at least half-time can now get up to 150 percent of their typical grant amount.

Year-round grants existed from 2009 to 2011 but were cut mostly because of funding shortages. They were revived in this year’s spending bill.

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Bonamici: Technical education grants have value


U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici says federal money for technical education is a good investment, not only for students who will get jobs but also for Oregon’s and the nation’s future.

Bonamici spoke Monday (June 19) after visiting with students and instructors at the STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) lab at Portland Community College Rock Creek campus.

The Beaverton Democrat spoke on the eve of a U.S. House vote to renew federal spending authority for career and technical education programs — and after President Donald Trump proposed May 23 to cut such spending in the 2018 federal budget.

“The administration’s budget proposal is its statement of values. It is not that of Congress,” Bonamici said to the students.

“Investments such as National Science Foundation scholarships are good investments because people have the skills to get a good job and contribute to the economy. I hope there will be bipartisan support for this kind of investment.”

The PCC program got a boost in December when the National Science Foundation granted about $900,000 for student scholarships.

“Ten years from now there will be jobs we cannot even imagine,” Bonamici said. “Having the flexibility and skills to be able to adapt to changing technology is where STEAM comes in.”

Joining her on the visit was Sandra Fowler-Hill, PCC Rock Creek president, who said the PCC Foundation has raised a record amount for student aid of all types.

“We will continue to look at ways to support our students,” she said. “If we are going to invest in our future, we’ve got to invest in them.”

Commitment to aid

Bonamici helped put the “A” in science, technology, engineering and math education. The 2015 renewal of federal aid to primary and secondary education, known as the Every Student Succeeds Act, contains her recommended model for integration of the arts with technical education.

Bonamici is a member of two House committees: Education and the Workforce, and Science, Space and Technology. The education panel endorsed a bill (HR 2353), up for a vote of the full House, to renew and revamp federal support for career and technical education. It dovetails with the 2015 education law.

A similar bill passed the House, 405-5, on Sept. 13 but died in the Senate amid a dispute about the authority of the U.S. education secretary to approve state plans.

“I am predicting with certainty this will pass,” said Bonamici, who is a cosponsor of the new bill.

“Oregon values career and technical education. We saw that with passage of the ballot measure (98) in the November election. But there are funding challenges, so having this federal legislation should help.”

Dorina Cornea is a PCC instructor and coordinator of the campus STEAM lab, which is host to a STEAM Camp for students this summer.

“This program has touched many lives,” Cornea said. “We are ready to move around and touch lives in high school.”

She said the lab hopes to extend its reach to middle and high school students in Washington County.

Stirring excitement

Some students already have landed jobs at Intel — the California technology company that is the largest private employer in Washington County and Oregon — through its microelectronics program.

But Donna Maleki, its Oregon community engagement manager, said Intel has a broader aim.

“There are students here who will be future employees,” she said. “But it is also important for us to engage the pipeline, so we look to leverage this space — really a community hub — to get students exposed to all this technology and get them inspired.”

Niels Johnson-Laird, who is both a student and a tutor, said while there is much talk about technologies such as 3-D printing, “you can come in (the lab) and we will help you use this technology.”

Bonamici was introduced to computer-aided industrial design on a machine called “Van Gogh,” after the Dutch artist, and saw the flight of a drone named “Zippy.”

A couple of other students told Bonamici about the value of the STEAM lab to their lives.

“I felt like I had always missed the boat,” Margo Brooks said. “It’s not that I wasn’t successful before; I did have challenging and rewarding positions. But I got to a point in my life where I had to reach out with the support of my husband for my childhood dreams. So I began this journey.”

Josh Luckey lost his job recently. He had studied history for two years in college but never completed a degree. Now he is working toward an associate degree in microelectronics technology.

“When I lost my job, I was terrified for awhile,” he said. “But then I figured I would turn it into an opportunity and do something I wanted to do, because the job I was doing was not really my dream job by any means. It was just paying the bills. I’ve never been happier; I’ve had so much fun.”

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Tanger Outlets Awards Childrens Education Grants Nationwide

For every coupon book sold, Tanger gives one dollar to the TangerKIDS Grants program which is designed to assist schools in Tanger Outlets’ primary markets by providing funding for special projects, needed programs or equipment. Grants can also support groups within schools of all grade levels, from Kindergarten to Grade 12. These grants are offered to multiple schools at each of Tanger’s 39 centers in the United States.

Since the company’s founding, Tanger Outlets has dedicated efforts to assist students in local communities from pre-school through high school by raising money that is used to purchase books and supplies, computers and new technology, athletic and playground equipment, and to fund reading programs and educational field trips. To date, Tanger Outlets has raised and donated in excess of $2.25 million to help children and schools succeed.

For a full list of schools receiving TangerKIDS grants please visit TangerKIDS.

About Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc.

Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. is a publicly-traded REIT headquartered in Greensboro, North Carolina that presently operates and owns, or has an ownership interest in, a portfolio of 43 upscale outlet shopping centers in 22 states coast to coast and in Canada, totaling approximately 14.8 million square feet leased to over 3,100 stores operated by more than 500 different brand name companies. With over 36 years of experience in the outlet industry and one additional center currently under construction, Tanger Outlet Centers continue to attract more than 188 million shoppers annually.  For more information on Tanger Outlet Centers, call 1-800-4TANGER or visit the Company’s web site at www.tangeroutlets.com.

CONTACT
Quentin Pell
quentin.pell@tangeroutlets.com

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/tanger-outlets-awards-childrens-education-grants-nationwide-300476117.html

SOURCE Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc.

Related Links

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Charter Targets Digital Education With Grant Program

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Apply For Environmental Education Grant

Bermudian residents, intending to study at a United States College or University are invited to apply for the Environmental Education Grant.

According to the Department of Environment and Natural Resources’ website: “The Environmental Education Grant was established to promote and encourage the study of conservation, ecology, agriculture, horticulture or related subjects and to recognize the importance of promoting these subjects as they relate to the appreciation, enhancement, and conservation of Bermuda’s environment.

Grants will be awarded to persons who are normally resident in Bermuda, who are intending to attend an accredited college, university or other educational establishment in the United States of America, approved by the Grant Committee, to study conservation, ecology, agriculture, horticulture, or a related subject through a course of courses which are intended to lead to a degree or diploma in any of the said subjects.”

The maximum value of the grant is $5,000 and will be awarded for one academic year only.

Applications are due on or before July 1st.

For more information visit: here and visit www.environment.bm to download the Environmental Education Grant Application Form. This form provides more information on how and where to submit your application.

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