Protesters Rally Outside Attorney General’s Office In Support Of Heald College

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – Dozens of people trying to keep Heald College open rallied outside the California attorney general’s office in Sacramento Friday.

They say Attorney General Kamala Harris’ office is making it impossible for Heald’s parent company, Corinthian, to sell the school and keep it open.

“We’re asking Kamala Harris to lift those blocks so that we can continue as a campus and as a school, and so that I can continue my education,” said Heald student Tracy St. John-Eggleston.

The attorney general’s office says Corinthian – which owns Everest College, Heald College and WyoTech – violated consumer protection and false advertising laws, specifically targeting veterans and low-income students.

Last July, Corinthian announced it would be selling most of its 100-plus campuses under an agreement with the Department of Education.

Harris’ office – along with attorney generals from eight other states – recently called on the Education Department to cancel loans for students who attended the allegedly predatory schools.

READ: Letter from 9 attorney generals to the Department of Education on Corinthian Colleges

“Our litigation with Corinthian is ongoing but our approval is not required for the sale of the college,” wrote Kristin Ford, a spokesperson for Harris’ office.

Ford notes that Heald had a long history of being a non-profit school, but has been a wholly-owned subsidiary of Corinthian Colleges since 2009.

Protesters outside Harris’ office were quick to note the impact Heald’s education has on their lives.

“Heald does matter; we help people transform their lives,” said college Cory Norwood.

Protestors Gather Outside Attorney General’s Office In Support Of Heald College

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – Dozens of people trying to keep Heald College open rallied outside the California attorney general’s office in Sacramento Friday.

They say Attorney General Kamala Harris’ office is making it impossible for Heald’s parent company, Corinthian, to sell the school and keep it open.

“We’re asking Kamala Harris to lift those blocks so that we can continue as a campus and as a school, and so that I can continue my education,” said Heald student Tracy St. John-Eggleston.

The attorney general’s office says Corinthian – which owns Everest College, Heald College and WyoTech – violated consumer protection and false advertising laws, specifically targeting veterans and low-income students.

Last July, Corinthian announced it would be selling most of its 100-plus campuses under an agreement with the Department of Education.

Harris’ office – along with attorney generals from eight other states – recently called on the Education Department to cancel loans for students who attended the allegedly predatory schools.

READ: Letter from 9 attorney generals to the Department of Education on Corinthian Colleges

“Our litigation with Corinthian is ongoing but our approval is not required for the sale of the college,” wrote Kristin Ford, a spokesperson for Harris’ office.

Ford notes that Heald had a long history of being a non-profit school, but has been a wholly-owned subsidiary of Corinthian Colleges since 2009.

Protesters outside Harris’ office were quick to note the impact Heald’s education has on their lives.

“Heald does matter; we help people transform their lives,” said college Cory Norwood.

Save Heald College Rally at Attorney General’s Office in San Francisco

Heald College:

WHAT WHY

 

 

Heald College students, faculty and staff will gather in front
of the Attorney General’s Office to demonstrate their support for
the school and encourage the Attorney General’s office to stop
effectively blocking a sale of Heald College that would allow for
it to remain open. This rally is part of the broader Save Heald
movement – learn more at
SaveHeald.com.

 

Heald College is a 152-year-old Bay Area institution that provides
a quality education to approximately 9,000 students and employs
more than 1,000 people at 10 campuses in the state and two
campuses in Oregon and Hawaii.

 

Heald’s parent organization is trying to sell Heald College, which
would allow Heald to remain open and its students to continue
their education and save more than 1,000 jobs. According to Heald
College, several highly qualified buyers have expressed serious
interest, but some already have been discouraged by lawyers in the
California Attorney General’s office who have insisted that any
buyer agree to burdensome oversight and onerous conditions, or be
threatened with liability for alleged past practices of Heald’s
parent organization. Heald President Eeva Deshon has asked
Attorney General Kamala Harris to personally intervene to help
save the college. If an agreement on a
sale cannot be reached by mid-April, Heald College will have to
eventually be closed.

 

WHEN

Friday, April 10

3 p.m.

 

WHERE

California Attorney General’s Office

455 Golden Gate Ave.

San Francisco, CA

 

WHO

Heald College students, faculty and staff

 

VISUALS

  • Large gathering of protestors
  • Signage

 

CONTACT

JOE HIXSON or ROSEMARY WILSON

(213) 630-6550

jrh@abmac.com or rdw@abmac.com

 

On Site Contact:

Wendy Mazotti

Executive Assistant to the President CEO

Heald College, Central Administrative Office

Cell: 925.951.1701

Save Heald College Rally at Attorney General’s Office in Sacramento

Heald College:

WHAT WHY

 

Heald College students, faculty and staff will gather in front
of the Attorney General’s Office to demonstrate their support for
the school and encourage the Attorney General’s office to stop
effectively blocking a sale of Heald College that would allow for
it to remain open. This rally is part of the broader Save Heald
movement – learn more at
SaveHeald.com.

 

Heald College is a 152-year-old Northern California institution
that provides a quality education to approximately 9,000 students
and employs more than 1,000 people at 10 campuses in the state and
two campuses in Oregon and Hawaii.

 

Heald’s parent organization is trying to sell Heald College, which
would allow Heald to remain open and its students to continue
their education and save more than 1,000 jobs. According to Heald
College, several highly qualified buyers have expressed serious
interest, but some already have been discouraged by lawyers in the
California Attorney General’s office who have insisted that any
buyer agree to burdensome oversight and onerous conditions, or be
threatened with liability for alleged past practices of Heald’s
parent organization. Heald President Eeva Deshon has asked
Attorney General Kamala Harris to personally intervene to help
save the college. If an agreement on a
sale cannot be reached by mid-April, Heald College will have to
eventually be closed.

 

WHEN

Friday, April 10

10 a.m.

 

WHERE

California Attorney General’s Office

1300 I Street

Sacramento, CA

 

WHO

Heald College students, faculty and staff

 

VISUALS

  • Large gathering of protestors
  • Signage

 

CONTACT

JOE HIXSON or ROSEMARY WILSON

(213) 630-6550

jrh@abmac.com or rdw@abmac.com

 

On Site Contact:

Cindy Timberlake

Campus President’s Assistant

Heald College | Roseville Campus

Cell: 916-240-2557

Fresno’s Heald College could close if buyer isn’t found by mid-April

Local News

Miss Clovis supports community

Weigh Online Degrees at Community College, For-Profit Programs

Students considering pursuing an online associate degree are most likely choosing between for-profit and community college options.

Traditional for-profits such as University of Phoenix and DeVry University have long been known for their online offerings, while community colleges actually serve the biggest share of exclusively online undergraduate students, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics.

Although both kinds of institutions have their merits, experts say making the right choice requires a careful analysis of which is the best educational fit.

[Discover how employers view an associate degree.]

When it comes to selecting between the two options, students who have time to research their program have an advantage.

“There’s huge variations in community colleges,” says educational technology consultant and market analyst Phil Hill. “So one of the first things to say about that is a consumer needs to be a much savvier consumer with community colleges.”

That said, Hill, a blogger for e-Literate, believes students can find a community college program with the polish of a for-profit program if they put in the time. For less-informed consumers, however, he says the for-profit route might be a bit safer.

Students may also want to factor cost into their choice.

For students looking to save money, community colleges are the way to go, says MiraCosta College freshman Liliha Hotard, who had considered the for-profit Grand Canyon Canyon University’s online program.

“I got multiple scholarships to there,” says Hotard, who is pursuing an associate degree in communications. “But it was still just so much money. And I feel like if I can get my two-year degree reasonably, that would be wonderful.”

To be fair, advisers at for-profit institutions are often willing to work with potential students to help them find as much financial aid as possible, Hill says. Even in an ideal scenario, though, the community college option is almost always cheaper, he adds.

[Explore how to vet a for-profit online program.]

Another factor to consider is academic support.

Experts agree that in general for-profit institutions are better at providing online support for students who want to stay fully virtual. One reason is those online programs are more often organized as units independent of the school’s brick-and-mortar operation.

Another reason is the abundance of data for-profits keep on their online students, which more easily allows them to recognize academic struggles, says Eric Bettinger, an associate professor at Stanford University’s education school.

Bettinger, who is partnering with DeVry to analyze the school’s student performance data, suggests this isn’t typically possible in the community college world.

“If I were to ask something like, well, did the student turn in an assignment, it’s very difficult for them to go figure out that data and isolate where the issues are,” he says.

Before students sign up for an online associate degree at either a community college or a for-profit institutions, they should first make sure they can study entirely online, experts say.

Nearly all community colleges offer some online learning. But many that claim to have fully online programs still require students to visit campus to acquire textbooks, seek advising or even take select courses, says Russell Poulin, the director of policy and analysis at WCET, a cooperative that pushes for the effective use of technology in higher education.

Students looking to add more specialization to their studies might need to turn to a face-to-face course, he adds. Conversely, some students may find it comforting to be able to visit their real-life community college campus should any academic issues arise, Poulin says.

Students might also want to consider where they want to work before they make their decision about where to study. If you want to get hired quickly after completing your degree, Hill says choosing the best career connected-school may depend on whether you want to relocate or stay near home. The national for-profits are going to have stronger national alumni connections, while community colleges will be more entrenched with local industries and human resources managers, he says.

[Determine when to switch gears from an associate degree to a bachelor’s program.]

Meanwhile, students hoping to move into a bachelor’s program following their associate degree will have an easier time getting credits recognized from a community college program, Poulin says. For example, some four-year schools may have issues with a for-profit school’s level of academic accreditation.

For students who look into both options but still can’t make up their minds, there is always trial and error. Students who aren’t sure if they will succeed in an online environment might find community college less daunting, because it’s easier to return to a face-to-face classroom in your community if things don’t go well, says Hotard, the MiraCosta student.

Hotard took all of her fall semester courses in a traditional classroom before switching to a fully online load in the spring to gain some work experience.

“I wanted to give it a try this semester, and of course if it didn’t work then I would just go back on campus next semester,” Hotard says. “But I’m really enjoying it.”

Trying to fund your online education? Get tips and more in the U.S. News Paying for Online Education center.

Ian Quillen is a Baltimore-based freelance reporter for U.S. News covering online education.Follow him on Twitter at @iaqdiesel or reach him by email.

Heald College Launches Campaign to Save 152-Year-Old California Institution

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Heald College announced today that it has launched a campaign to keep its doors open after lawyers in the California Attorney General’s office made “unreasonable demands” that have thwarted a possible sale that would enable the college to continue operating and avoid disrupting the lives of thousands of students and employees.

“We’ve survived the San Francisco earthquake and two world wars in our 152-year-history,” said Heald College President Eeva Deshon. “Now we’re fighting to survive bureaucratic meddling in the Attorney General’s office. Time is running out to arrange a sale. Our parent organization only has until mid-April to reach an agreement with a buyer or Heald College will have to close its doors.”

In an open letter to Attorney General Kamala Harris, Deshon said lawyers from Harris’ office are effectively blocking a sale of the college by Heald’s parent organization, Corinthian Colleges. Corinthian is being sued by the state as it attempts to sell off its remaining assets to resolve its financial and regulatory problems. Unless Heald can be sold, Deshon said the 152-year-old California institution will be closed and its 9,000 students will not be able complete their education. More than 1,000 Heald College faculty members will lose their jobs. Deshon called on Harris to personally intervene to resolve the issue and help keep the college open.

More than 4,500 Heald College students, faculty, staff and supporters have signed a petition at www.saveheald.com to Attorney General Kamala Harris and plan to hold rallies on Friday in Sacramento and San Francisco to ask her to personally intervene to help keep the college from closing. Heald College supporters plan to hold a rally at the Attorney General’s Sacramento office at 10am and at the Attorney General’s San Francisco office at 3pm.

“…We are in grave danger of being closed because of unreasonable demands being made by lawyers in the Attorney General’s office who are suing our parent organization,” Deshon wrote in her letter. “…Our students are satisfied with the education they are receiving at Heald College and believe their education and training is valuable and provides benefits to them.”

Heald College was purchased in 2010 by Corinthian Colleges, which has closed a dozen of its campuses and sold more than 50 campuses in other states as part of a settlement with the U.S. Department of Education that allows the campuses to continue to operate under new ownership. In California, however, efforts to work out a similar transaction to sell Heald College have been blocked by demands of the Attorney General’s office against Corinthian and its subsidiaries. These demands include a requirement that the buyer enter into an injunction that effectively requires the buyer to assume blame and possible liability for the actions of an organization it had nothing to do with before the acquisition.

“The demands being made of prospective buyers and Heald’s parent organization may effectively block any chance to sell Heald, and will force Heald’s closure,” Deshon said. “It clearly serves no public purpose. The Attorney General’s office has been a driving force in putting Corinthian Colleges out of business. Corinthian won’t be operating any schools. The sale of Heald College will ensure that students can continue their education under new ownership.

“If Heald College is forced to close, its students will be forced to discontinue their studies. Closure of the college will have a devastating impact on the students’ lives and aspirations. It means that their Pell Grants and Cal Grants will not reset, and if they apply for the Federal loan discharge program, they also will lose their academic credits. Blocking the sale by imposing unreasonable demands only serves to punish our students and employees.

“Heald College is a vibrant California institution that has provided a quality education to 43,000 graduates over the past decade,” Deshon said. She added that a recent survey found that the vast majority (more than 85%) of Heald students are satisfied with the education they are receiving.

ABOUT HEALD COLLEGE:

Founded in 1863, Heald College has a proud history of educating Californians and helping them achieve their life goals. Among its alumni are people who helped shape the political, cultural and commercial landscape of the state. They include reform Governor Hiram Johnson, Bank of America founder A. P. Giannini and M. H. de Young, founder of San Francisco’s de Young Museum.

OPEN LETTER TO CALIFORNIA ATTORNEY GENERAL KAMALA HARRIS:

Dear Attorney General Harris:

We need your help to save Heald College, and we need it soon.

Heald College has a proud history of educating Californians and helping them achieve their life goals that stretches back more than 150 years. Among our alumni are people who helped shape the political, cultural, and commercial landscape of this great state. They include former Governor Hiram Johnson, Bank of America founder A. P. Giannini, and M. H. de Young, founder of San Francisco’s de Young Museum.

Today, Heald College remains a vibrant California institution that provides a quality education to approximately 9,000 students and employs some 1,500 people at 10 campuses in the state and two campuses in Oregon and Hawaii. Our academic credits are recognized by more than two dozen colleges and universities including California State University. A recent survey confirms that the vast majority (more than 85 percent) of our students are satisfied with the education they are receiving at Heald College and believe their education and training is valuable and provides benefits to them. Heald is highly regarded by the employers who hire our students and in the communities we serve.

Heald College occupies a unique position among California’s educational institutions. For some students, we are their first college experience. Approximately half of our students, however, have tried community college or a four year institution and have come to us after those institutions could not, or did not, meet their needs. A large number of our students work or have children and need the flexible class schedules and other services that we offer.

During its long history, Heald College has survived the devastating 1906 San Francisco earthquake and two world wars. But we are in grave danger of being closed because of unreasonable demands being made by lawyers in the Attorney General’s office who are suing our parent organization – demands that if not resolved will result in the shameful destruction of Heald College.

Five years ago, Heald College was purchased by Corinthian Colleges, Inc., which has now agreed with the U.S. Department of Education to sell or teach-out its schools and go out of business. As part of a settlement with the Department of Education, Corinthian closed about a dozen of its campuses in other states and sold more than 50 of the rest. Heald College is the largest remaining college owned by Corinthian.

Corinthian is now in the process of trying to sell Heald College, which would allow Heald to remain open and its students to continue their education and save more than 1,000 jobs. Several highly qualified buyers – including non-profits – have expressed serious interest, but some already have been discouraged by your staff lawyers’ insistence that they agree to overly burdensome oversight and onerous financial conditions, or be threatened with liability for the alleged past practices of Corinthian Colleges. That effectively blocks any chance to sell Heald College and will force its closure and liquidation. Interested buyers remain, but it is imperative to a sale that they not be scared off by unreasonable demands or threats from your office.

The Attorney General’s office has been a driving force in putting Corinthian Colleges out of business. Corinthian won’t be operating any schools. The sale of Heald College will ensure that students can continue their education under new ownership. If Heald College is forced to close its doors, its students will be forced to discontinue their studies. Closure of the college will have a devastating impact on the students’ lives and aspirations. Their Pell Grants and Cal Grants will not reset, and, if they apply for a Federal loan discharge, they will also lose their academic credits.

Heald College has already addressed the concerns specific to Heald College that have been identified by attorneys in your office. Beyond those changes to Heald practices, what your staff lawyers want from prospective buyers and our parent organization may simply be unacceptable to those parties. Blocking the sale by imposing unreasonable demands only serves to punish our students and employees. All we ask is that potential buyers not be threatened with devastating lawsuits for alleged conduct of prior ownership so that Heald College can survive under new ownership and continue to serve its students.

Time is running out to arrange a sale. Our parent organization only has until mid-April to reach an agreement with a buyer or Heald College will have to close its doors. So, again, on behalf of our students, staff and faculty, I am calling on you to help save Heald College.

Sincerely,

Eeva K Deshon
President CEO
Heald College

Starbucks Expands College Tuition Program For Workers

<!–

BREAKING:

Watch Family of Walter Scott Discuss S.C. Officer Shooting and Murder Charge

pouring samples of Starbucks David Ryder / Reuters

Sandy Roberts pours samples of Starbucks Reserve Sun Dried Ethiopia Yirgacheffe coffee during the company’s annual shareholders meeting in Seattle, Washington.


Starbucks is making its tuition reimbursement program for its workers a double.

The coffee chain is expanding the eligibility for its program from just those with junior and senior amounts of college credits to allow for a full four years of paid tuition for an online degree from Arizona State University.

The tuition program is a collaboration between Starbucks and Arizona State University, which charges roughly $30,000 for two years of its online degree program. The annual cost of an online education at ASU for an out-of-state student is $11,713.

As part of the agreement with Starbucks, ASU is providing an upfront discount or scholarship of about 42 percent of the standard tuition for eligible workers at the chain’s company-owned U.S. stores. That means Starbucks would be responsible for up to 58 percent.

The amount Starbucks pays stands to be less, however, since many workers are expected to qualify for federal Pell grants and other aid as a result of their limited incomes. Workers would pay whatever costs are leftover, upfront, and Starbucks would reimburse them at the end of each semester.

Previously, Starbucks had said it would pay back workers after the completion of 21 credits, which had prompted some criticism that workers were being forced to wait too long for reimbursement.

Critics further charged the program as it was initially presented was misleading.

“They called it free college but students had to front a lot of the money,” said Rachel Fishman, an education policy analyst at New America, a public policy think tank. In a press release, Starbucks referred to the new program as a “benefit for Starbucks partners.”

Experts say that in general it’s a great deal for students, with an important caveat.

“The main aspect that’s still problematic is they’re working while going to school,” said Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of EdVisors.com, a website about paying for college.

He cited conflicts between work, school, and home as a difficult balance, and the main reason why students drop out of college. That would then make workers ineligible for reimbursement and responsible for any debts they incurred to pay for the courses.

Those students who are successful at going to work and going to school, said Kantrowitz, do one or the other part time.

“You can’t bend time,” said Fishman.

To be eligible for the program, a Starbucks employee must be working 20 hours a week or more.

So far, Starbucks Corp. says nearly 2,000 workers have enrolled for the program; the chain has more than 140,000 workers at its company-owned U.S. stores and support centers.

— The Associated Press contributed to this report

IN-DEPTH

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  • Starbucks Contribution to Scholarship Overstated
  • Starbucks Free Tuition Could Boost More Than Baristas
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    Email ben.popken@nbcuni.com. Twitter: @bpopken. Senior staff writer responsible for consumer and travel reporting for NBCNews.com. Popken was the managing editor of Consumerist.com, published by Consumer Reports, prior to joining NBC full-time in 2013. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.

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    Watch Family of Walter Scott Discuss S.C. Officer Shooting and Murder Charge

    “,”id”:”NewsCms/BreakingNewsMarquee/311666″,”externalId”:”311666″,”externalSource”:”NewsCms”,”last_update_date”:”2015-04-08 01:05:11 Z”},”native_ad”:null},”metadata”:null,”results”:[{“body”:[{“type”:”p”,”html”:””},{“type”:”widget”,”widget_type”:”inline-video”,”videoType”:”Non Broadcast Live Video”,”mpxId”:”322485827772″,”guid”:”nbcnewslive_nyc2″,”pubDate”:”2015-04-08 00:29:54 Z”,”expirationDate”:”2044-08-27 16:40:34 Z”,”playbackIsDisabled”:false,”availabilityState”:”available”,”title”:”Watch Live: Walter Scott’s Family Holds Presser on Cop’s Murder Charge”,”description”:”The family of Walter Scott is speaking about South Carolina police officer Michael Slager’s murder charge in connection with the shooting of Scott following a traffic stop.”,”thumbnail”:”http://media1.s-nbcnews.com/i/MSNBC/Components/Video/__NEW/DefaultImage_NBCNews_1920x1080__094069.jpg”,”source”:”Live Video”,”sourceId”:null,”canonicalUrl”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/watch/live-video/watch-live-walter-scott-s-family-holds-presser-on-cop-s-murder-charge-322485827772″,”shortUrl”:”http://nbcnews.to/1a3cRdy”,”associatedPlaylistUrl”:”http://feed.theplatform.com/f/2E2eJC/nnd_NBCNewsMostViewed”,”fallbackPlaylistUrl”:null,”topVideosPlaylistUrl”:”http://feed.theplatform.com/f/2E2eJC/nnd_20381145″,”mezzVersion”:”1″,”embedUrl”:”http://player.theplatform.com/p/2E2eJC/nbcNewsOffsite?guid=nbcnewslive_nyc2″,”videoAssets”:[{“format”:”F4M”,”assetType”:”Live HDS”,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/fCxrUe0_4Kt7?MBR=TRUE”,”width”:”0″,”height”:”0″,”bitRate”:”0″,”privateUrl”:null},{“format”:”M3U”,”assetType”:”Live HLS”,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/G_sme_TUOg_i?MBR=TRUE”,”width”:”0″,”height”:”0″,”bitRate”:”0″,”privateUrl”:null}],”defaultAssociation”:null,”duration”:3,”liveVideoEvent”:null,”liveVideoStatus”:”Live”,”hasCaption”:false,”autoPlay”:true},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”A police officer in North Charleston, South Carolina, was charged with murder Tuesday after a cell-phone video was released of him fatally shooting an apparently unarmed man in the back following a traffic stop Saturday.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”Michael Slager, 33, was arrested by the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division and faces 30 years to life in prison or the death penalty, state officials said in a news release.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”The incident occurred after Slager pulled over a car with a broken taillight around 9:30 a.m. ET. The video, which was obtained by The New York Times, picks up after the stop. Slager is seen shooting in a vacant lot at the suspect — later identified as 50-year-old Walter Scott — about eight times as he runs away.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”The officer, who is white, said the suspect, who is black, took his Taser and that he feared for his life.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””Shots fired. Subject is down. 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At a Tuesday news conference, North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey said the decision to charge the officer came after viewing the footage.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””},{“type”:”widget”,”widget_type”:”inline-video”,”videoType”:”WebExtra”,”mpxId”:”424545859566″,”guid”:”f_911_south_carolina_cop_shooting_murder_case_150407″,”pubDate”:”2015-04-07 23:41:00 Z”,”expirationDate”:”2112-09-25 23:41:00 Z”,”playbackIsDisabled”:false,”availabilityState”:”available”,”title”:”Hear 911 Call of S.C. 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  • Detroit-Area Cops Shown Beating Black Man, Floyd Dent, During Traffic Stop
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  • “},{“type”:”h2″,”html”:”SOCIAL”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”Warning: Video below could be disturbing to some viewers“},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””},{“type”:”widget”,”widget_type”:”vimeo”,”video-id”:”124336782″},{“type”:”h5″,”html”:”— Erik Ortiz”}],”summary”:”Slager, 33, was arrested by the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division in the shooting death of 50-year-old Walter Scott.”,”mediaList”:null,”breaking_news”:true,”show_on_cover”:true,”ads_enabled”:true,”comments_enabled”:true,”search_enabled”:true,”native_ad”:false,”copyright”:””,”cover_art”:null,”tease_art”:null,”canonical_url”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/michael-slager-south-carolina-officer-charged-murder-black-man-n337526″,”short_url”:”http://nbcnews.to/1E1LHjE”,”title_url_slug”:”michael-slager-s-c-cop-charged-murder-black-man-walter”,”original_canonical_url”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/michael-slager-south-carolina-officer-charged-murder-black-man-n337526″,”source”:”NBC News”,”seo_slug”:”michael-slager-south-carolina-officer-charged-with-murder-of-black”,”seo_headline”:””,”headline_breaking_news”:”BREAKING”,”pinned”:false,”source_type”:””,”type”:”post”,”headline”:”Michael Slager, S.C. Cop, Charged With Murder of Black Man Walter Scott”,”headline_cover”:”South Carolina Officer Charged With Murder of Black Man”,”headline_slug”:”michael-slager-s-c-cop-charged-murder-black-man-walter”,”social_headline”:”South Carolina Police Officer Charged With Murder of Unarmed Black Man After Shooting”,”bylines”:[],”first_published_utc”:”2015-04-07 22:40:51 Z”,”last_published_utc”:”2015-04-08 01:06:31 Z”,”sections”:[{“title”:”News”,”slug”:”news”}],”topics”:[{“title”:”U.S. news”,”slug”:”us-news”},{“title”:”NBCBLK”,”slug”:”nbcblk”}],”feature”:[],”show”:[],”storyline”:[],”tags”:[],”labels”:[],”id”:”NewsCms/Entry/337526″,”externalId”:”337526″,”externalSource”:”NewsCms”,”main_art”:{“caption”:”Walter Scott runs from North Charleston police officer Michael Thomas Slager before he was shot in a video taken by an anonymous bystander.”,”url”:”http://media1.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2015_15/966916/150407-walter-scott-shooting-mn-1915_7a5d6305490fe4e68779c864c7f74086.jpg”,”credit”:”Anonymous”,”source”:null,”alt_text”:null,”width”:1400,”height”:783,”title”:””}},{“body”:[{“type”:”p”,”html”:”U.S. officials said Tuesday that Russia was behind a cyberattack on an unclassified White House system last year.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”The conclusion that Russia was behind the hack was first reported by CNN. U.S. officials later confirmed to NBC News that Russia allegedly conducted the cyberattack. But the international hack allegedly did not impact any classified information, officials said. The system contained the president’s private schedule.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””This report is not referring to a new incident — it is speculating on the attribution of the activity of concern on the unclassified EOP network that the White House disclosed last year,” National Security Council spokesman Mark Stroh said.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””Any such activity is something we take very seriously. In this case, as we made clear at the time, we took immediate measures to evaluate and mitigate the activity,” Stroh said in a statement.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”He would not confirm that Russia is believed to have carried out the hack, but other U.S. officials confirmed to NBC News that Russia was behind it. Two sources, one in law enforcement and another in the intelligence community, said Tuesday that no classified information was breached.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”Officials told NBC News it is believed the Russians got into the system through State Department computers.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes said the Obama administration was up front when it disclosed the “cyber intrusion” last year, and the White House takes regular steps to prevent hackers from gaining access.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””},{“type”:”widget”,”widget_type”:”inline-video”,”videoType”:”WebExtra”,”mpxId”:”349606467911″,”guid”:”x_dc_nn_WhiteHouseHacking_141029″,”pubDate”:”2014-10-29 22:32:00 Z”,”expirationDate”:”2112-04-18 22:32:00 Z”,”playbackIsDisabled”:false,”availabilityState”:”available”,”title”:”Feds Say White House Computer Hack Points to Russia”,”description”:”An unclassified White House computer system was hacked earlier this month and feds say there are signs the attack originated in Russia.”,”thumbnail”:”http://media2.s-nbcnews.com/i/MSNBC/Components/Video/__NEW/x_dc_nn_WhiteHouseHacking_141029.jpg”,”source”:”Nightly News”,”sourceId”:null,”canonicalUrl”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/watch/nightly-news/feds-say-white-house-computer-hack-points-to-russia-349606467911″,”shortUrl”:”http://nbcnews.to/1u8QNHr”,”associatedPlaylistUrl”:”http://feed.theplatform.com/f/2E2eJC/nnd_22316432″,”fallbackPlaylistUrl”:null,”topVideosPlaylistUrl”:”http://feed.theplatform.com/f/2E2eJC/nnd_20381145″,”mezzVersion”:”1″,”embedUrl”:”http://player.theplatform.com/p/2E2eJC/nbcNewsOffsite?guid=x_dc_nn_WhiteHouseHacking_141029″,”videoAssets”:[{“format”:”MPEG4″,”assetType”:”OnceURL”,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/PnolD7Lx27mu”,”width”:”0″,”height”:”0″,”bitRate”:”0″,”privateUrl”:null},{“format”:”MPEG4″,”assetType”:”Limelight MP4″,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/yJTnjhPdg4Wn”,”width”:”640″,”height”:”360″,”bitRate”:”800000″,”privateUrl”:null},{“format”:”ISM”,”assetType”:”Smooth_1″,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/v_HxfvCDydes”,”width”:”1464″,”height”:”824″,”bitRate”:”3739048″,”privateUrl”:null},{“format”:”MPEG4″,”assetType”:”Limelight MP4″,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/4g6Anbq0axmg”,”width”:”420″,”height”:”240″,”bitRate”:”500000″,”privateUrl”:null}],”defaultAssociation”:null,”duration”:81,”liveVideoEvent”:null,”liveVideoStatus”:null,”hasCaption”:false,”autoPlay”:false},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””There’s always vulnerability,” Rhodes said. “The fact is that’s why we have a classified system, because there’s less risk on the classified system, and that is secure. On the unclassified system, we take regular actions to prevent vulnerabilities in security.””},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”Russia is believed to have accessed classified systems in the past.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”It likely carried out the “agent.btz” malware attack on U.S. military systems in 2008, which occurred after a corrupted flash drive was inserted into a U.S. military laptop in the Middle East, said former FBI assistant executive director Shawn Henry, who is now CEO of the cybersecurity consulting firm Crowdstrike.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””I have no doubt that the Russians and the Chinese are in all of these White House networks,” Henry said.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”NBC News has reported last year’s White House hack occurred in early October, and there were signs the cyber intrusion originated in Russia with the backing of Russia’s government.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”The hack came after the U.S. imposed sanctions on Russia over its actions in Ukraine, which eventually led to the annexation of Crimea in early 2014. Russia was also accused of supporting separatist fighters in eastern Ukraine.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”Last week, President Barack Obama signed an executive order authorizing the first sanctions program against cyberattackers who pose a “significant threat” to American interests.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””Our primary focus will be on cyber threats from overseas,” Obama wrote in a statement on the website Medium. “In many cases, diplomatic and law enforcement tools will still be our most effective response. But targeted sanctions, used judiciously, will give us a new and powerful way to go after the worst of the worst.””},{“type”:”h5″,”html”:”— with Eamon Javers, Richard Esposito and Phil Helsel”}],”summary”:”After an investigation, officials say Russia got into the White House computers through vulnerabilities in the State Department’s computer network.”,”mediaList”:null,”breaking_news”:false,”show_on_cover”:true,”ads_enabled”:true,”comments_enabled”:true,”search_enabled”:true,”native_ad”:false,”copyright”:””,”cover_art”:null,”tease_art”:null,”canonical_url”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/russia-hacked-white-house-last-year-u-s-officials-say-n337521″,”short_url”:”http://nbcnews.to/1E2aX9m”,”title_url_slug”:”russia-hacked-white-house-last-year-u-s-officials-say”,”original_canonical_url”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/russia-hacked-white-house-last-year-u-s-officials-say-n337521″,”source”:”NBC News”,”seo_slug”:”russia-hacked-white-house-last-year-u-s-officials-say”,”seo_headline”:””,”headline_breaking_news”:””,”pinned”:false,”source_type”:””,”video”:{“type”:””,”widget_type”:””,”videoType”:”Broadcast”,”mpxId”:”424502851890″,”guid”:”nn_mit_washington_hack_150407″,”pubDate”:”2015-04-07 22:33:33 Z”,”expirationDate”:”2024-12-31 23:59:00 Z”,”playbackIsDisabled”:false,”availabilityState”:”available”,”title”:”Russia Hacked White House Last Year, U.S. Officials Say”,”description”:”After an investigation, officials say Russia got into the White House computers through vulnerabilities in the State Department’s computer network.”,”thumbnail”:”http://media1.s-nbcnews.com/i/MSNBC/Components/Video/__NEW/2015-04-07T22-34-01-3Z–1280×720.jpg”,”source”:”Nightly News”,”sourceId”:null,”canonicalUrl”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/u.s.-officials-believe-russia-hacked-white-house-in-2014-424502851890″,”shortUrl”:”http://nbcnews.to/1a2Vb1H”,”associatedPlaylistUrl”:”http://feed.theplatform.com/f/2E2eJC/nnd_21426473″,”fallbackPlaylistUrl”:null,”topVideosPlaylistUrl”:”http://feed.theplatform.com/f/2E2eJC/nnd_20381145″,”mezzVersion”:”1″,”embedUrl”:”http://player.theplatform.com/p/2E2eJC/nbcNewsOffsite?guid=nn_mit_washington_hack_150407″,”videoAssets”:[{“format”:”MPEG4″,”assetType”:”Akamai Video”,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/AWxGL0m_E_QN?mbr=true”,”width”:”426″,”height”:”240″,”bitRate”:”546124″,”privateUrl”:null},{“format”:”MPEG4″,”assetType”:”Akamai Video”,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/tmB8yYacA6YW?mbr=true”,”width”:”1280″,”height”:”720″,”bitRate”:”3382187″,”privateUrl”:null},{“format”:”MPEG4″,”assetType”:”Akamai Video”,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/RSH_bGaTqb5P?mbr=true”,”width”:”854″,”height”:”480″,”bitRate”:”1636524″,”privateUrl”:null},{“format”:”MPEG4″,”assetType”:”Akamai Video”,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/eH6uULBVKM7x?mbr=true”,”width”:”640″,”height”:”360″,”bitRate”:”983348″,”privateUrl”:null},{“format”:”ISM”,”assetType”:”Smooth_1″,”publicUrl”:”http://link.theplatform.com/s/2E2eJC/gcko3kAkA_bM”,”width”:”1464″,”height”:”824″,”bitRate”:”3764000″,”privateUrl”:null}],”duration”:50,”hasCaption”:false},”type”:”videospread”,”headline”:”Russia Hacked White House Last Year, U.S. Officials Say”,”headline_cover”:”Russia Hacked White House, U.S. Officials Say”,”headline_slug”:”russia-hacked-white-house-last-year-u-s-officials-say”,”social_headline”:”Russia Hacked White House Last Year, U.S. Officials Say”,”bylines”:[{“type”:”Byline”,”is_vip”:false,”city”:”Washington, D.C.”,”facebook_page”:null,”gplus”:null,”instagram”:null,”professional_title”:”NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent; Host, ‘Andrea Mitchell Reports'”,”show_or_site”:null,”twitter_handle”:”@mitchellreports”,”email”:null,”bio”:”

    Andrea Mitchell, the veteran NBC chief foreign affairs correspondent, is also the host of “Andrea Mitchell Reports,” an hour of political news and interviews with top newsmakers on MSNBC.

    Mitchell covered the entire 2008 presidential campaign, from the kickoff in February 2007, broadcasting live from every major primary and caucus state and all the candidate debates for NBC News and MSNBC programs, including “TODAY,” “Nightly News with Brian Williams,” “Hardball,” “Morning Joe” and “Meet the Press.”

    She also covered Barack Obama’s trip to Iraq, the Middle East and Europe during the presidential campaign. Mitchell currently covers foreign policy, intelligence and national security issues for all NBC News properties.

    As a featured political correspondent in 2004, Mitchell was a regular panelist on MSNBC’s “Hardball” and was the first reporter to break the story that Democratic presidential nominee Sen. John Kerry had chosen Sen. John Edwards as his vice presidential running mate.

    In September 2005, Mitchell authored “Talking Back,” a memoir about her experiences as one of the first women to cover five presidents, Congress and foreign policy.

    That year, Mitchell also received the prestigious Goldsmith Career Award for Excellence in Journalism from the John F. Kennedy School of Government.

    In 2004, the Radio-Television News Directors Association honored Mitchell with the Leonard Zeidenberg Award for her contribution to the protection of First Amendment freedoms.

    Mitchell’s extensive and varied reports include a series of exclusive interviews over the years with Cuban President Fidel Castro. Her unprecedented access resulted in a one-hour documentary on Cuba in December 2003.

    Throughout 2002 and 2003, Mitchell covered the United Nations debate leading up to the Iraq war and provided detailed reports on the questions surrounding pre-war intelligence and weapons of mass destruction.

    As a longtime analyst of the intelligence community, Mitchell’s past assignments for NBC have included exclusive reports from North Korea, Afghanistan, the Middle East, Bosnia, Kosovo, Pakistan and Haiti.

    During the 2000 campaign, Mitchell hosted MSNBC’s “The Mitchell Report,” NBC News’ election year broadcast of record. In addition, she was the lead NBC News correspondent covering Hillary Rodham Clinton’s race for the Senate in 2000.

    Among her many past assignments, Mitchell was NBC News’ chief White House correspondent, a position she assumed after covering Bill Clinton from the New Hampshire primary through the entire 1992 presidential campaign.

    From 1988-1992, Mitchell served as chief congressional correspondent. During that time, she played a major role in reporting on the budget, the savings and loan bailout, the Clarence Thomas hearings and other legislative issues. She also served as a regular political analyst on “TODAY” and was a panelist in the second Bush-Dukakis presidential debate.

    Mitchell first covered the White House for NBC News during both of Ronald Reagan’s terms as president. She reported on a variety of noteworthy stories, including arms control, the budget, tax reform and the Iran-contra scandal, and traveled extensively with President Reagan to summits with Mikhail Gorbachev and other world leaders.

    Over the years, Mitchell has appeared on “Meet the Press” as a panelist and substitute host. An acclaimed political reporter, during the 1988 Republican National Convention, she beat both the competition and presidential candidate George Bush with the announcement that Bush had chosen Dan Quayle to be his running mate.

    Mitchell joined NBC News in 1978 as a general correspondent based in Washington, D.C. In 1979, she was named NBC’s energy correspondent. In that capacity, she reported on the energy crisis and the Three Mile Island nuclear incident.

    Before joining NBC, she was a correspondent for WDVM-TV (then WTOP), the CBS affiliate in Washington, D.C., From 1967-1976, she was a broadcast journalist for KYW Radio and KYW-TV in Philadelphia.

    A native of New York, Mitchell received a B.A. degree in English literature from the University of Pennsylvania where she currently serves as a trustee, a member of the Executive Committee and Chairman of the Annenberg School Advisory Board. She also serves on the board of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and is a member of the Gridiron Club.

    Mitchell is married to former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan and resides in Washington, D.C.

    “,”name”:”Andrea Mitchell”,”byline_type”:”author”,”picture”:{“credit”:”Timothy Greenfield-Sanders”,”caption”:”Image: NBC News Correspondents”,”url”:”http://media3.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2014_13/287876/140103-byline-andrea-mitchell-sq_24c6bfaa2b1a48eb258af110aed367f4.jpg”,”width”:1500,”height”:1500}}],”first_published_utc”:”2015-04-08 00:47:15 Z”,”last_published_utc”:”2015-04-08 01:02:00 Z”,”sections”:[{“title”:”News”,”slug”:”news”}],”topics”:[{“title”:”U.S. news”,”slug”:”us-news”}],”feature”:[],”show”:[],”storyline”:[],”tags”:[],”labels”:[],”id”:”NewsCms/Entry/337521″,”externalId”:”337521″,”externalSource”:”NewsCms”,”main_art”:{“caption”:”The White House seen from outside the north lawn fence in Washington in this September 22, 2014, file photo.”,”url”:”http://media4.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2015_15/926951/nn-150311-white-house-jsw_eda4c0040749328ccd8a7b1f0dedbe02.jpg”,”credit”:”KEVIN LAMARQUE”,”source”:”Reuters file”,”alt_text”:”Image: File photo of the White House seen from outside the north lawn fence in Washington”,”width”:2500,”height”:1477,”title”:”Image: File photo of the White House seen from outside the north lawn fence in Washington”}},{“body”:[{“type”:”p”,”html”:”As tons of desperately needed medical supplies await clearance to be flown into Yemen, aid workers warned Tuesday of an unfolding humanitarian crisis, saying at least 560 people, including dozens of children, have been killed, mostly in a Saudi-led air campaign and battles between Shiite rebels and forces loyal to the embattled president.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”More than 1,700 people have been wounded and another 100,000 have fled their homes as fighting intensified over the past three weeks, the World Health Organization said.”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:”The Red Cross shipment would be the first to reach Yemen since the start of the Saudi-imposed air blockade. 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  • Dozens Killed in Fighting Near Yemen’s Aden Port
  • U.S. Supports, Would Help Proposed Arab Force, Carter Says
  • Airstrike Hits Yemen Refugee Camp, Killing 45
  • “},{“type”:”h5″,”html”:”— The Associated Press”},{“type”:”p”,”html”:””}],”summary”:”The dead include dozens of children killed in airstrikes led by Saudi Arabia and in fighting as Shiite rebels try to seize territory.”,”mediaList”:null,”breaking_news”:false,”show_on_cover”:true,”ads_enabled”:true,”comments_enabled”:true,”search_enabled”:true,”native_ad”:false,”copyright”:””,”cover_art”:null,”tease_art”:null,”canonical_url”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/560-dead-amid-fears-humanitarian-collapse-yemen-n337566″,”short_url”:”http://nbcnews.to/1a3hwMo”,”title_url_slug”:”560-dead-amid-fears-humanitarian-collapse-yemen”,”original_canonical_url”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/560-dead-amid-fears-humanitarian-collapse-yemen-n337566″,”source”:”NBC News”,”seo_slug”:”560-dead-amid-fears-of-humanitarian-collapse-in-yemen”,”seo_headline”:””,”headline_breaking_news”:””,”pinned”:false,”source_type”:””,”type”:”post”,”headline”:”560 Dead Amid Fears of Humanitarian Collapse in Yemen”,”headline_cover”:”560 Killed in Yemen, Aid Workers Warn of Crisis”,”headline_slug”:”560-dead-amid-fears-humanitarian-collapse-yemen”,”social_headline”:”560 Dead Amid Fears of Humanitarian Collapse in Yemen”,”bylines”:[],”first_published_utc”:”2015-04-08 00:58:58 Z”,”last_published_utc”:”2015-04-08 01:00:54 Z”,”sections”:[{“title”:”News”,”slug”:”news”}],”topics”:[{“title”:”World”,”slug”:”world”}],”feature”:[],”show”:[],”storyline”:[],”tags”:[],”labels”:[],”id”:”NewsCms/Entry/337566″,”externalId”:”337566″,”externalSource”:”NewsCms”,”main_art”:{“caption”:null,”url”:”http://media2.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2015_15/966991/04694415_2420963da18dadde6ec87b47ac033961.jpg”,”credit”:”YAHYA ARHAB”,”source”:”EPA”,”alt_text”:”Image: Yemenis face shortage of water”,”width”:4096,”height”:2732,”title”:”Image: Yemenis face shortage of water”}},{“body”:[{“type”:”url”,”html”:”http://scores.nbcsports.com/wcbk/boxscore.asp?gamecode=201504070129″},{“type”:”source”,”html”:”NBC Sports”}],”summary”:”Follow live as UConn and Notre Dame battle for the Women’s NCAA National Title. UConn hopes to win their tenth. Notre Dame hopes to win their second.”,”mediaList”:null,”breaking_news”:false,”show_on_cover”:true,”ads_enabled”:true,”comments_enabled”:true,”search_enabled”:true,”native_ad”:false,”copyright”:null,”cover_art”:null,”tease_art”:null,”canonical_url”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/news/sports/follow-live-uconn-vs-notre-dame-ncaa-womens-final-n337571″,”short_url”:”http://nbcnews.to/1E2cFaS”,”title_url_slug”:”follow-live-uconn-vs-notre-dame-ncaa-womens-final”,”original_canonical_url”:”http://www.nbcnews.com/news/sports/follow-live-uconn-vs-notre-dame-ncaa-womens-final-n337571″,”source”:”NBC Sports”,”seo_slug”:”follow-live-uconn-vs-notre-dame-in-ncaa-womens-final”,”seo_headline”:””,”headline_breaking_news”:””,”pinned”:false,”source_type”:””,”type”:”externallink”,”headline”:”FOLLOW LIVE: UConn vs. Notre Dame in NCAA Women’s Final”,”headline_cover”:”FOLLOW LIVE: Notre Dame Stands Between UConn and 10th NCAA Final”,”headline_slug”:”follow-live-uconn-vs-notre-dame-ncaa-womens-final”,”social_headline”:”FOLLOW LIVE: UConn vs. Notre Dame in NCAA Women’s Final”,”bylines”:[],”first_published_utc”:”2015-04-08 00:56:31 Z”,”last_published_utc”:”2015-04-08 00:56:31 Z”,”sections”:[{“title”:”News”,”slug”:”news”}],”topics”:[{“title”:”Sports”,”slug”:”sports”}],”feature”:[],”show”:[],”storyline”:[],”tags”:[],”labels”:[],”id”:”NewsCms/Entry/337571″,”externalId”:”337571″,”externalSource”:”NewsCms”,”main_art”:{“caption”:”Notre Dame forward Brianna Turner (11) and Connecticut forward Breanna Stewart (30) tip off the ball during the first half of the NCAA women’s Final Four tournament college basketball championship game, Tuesday, April 7, 2015, in Tampa, Fla. “,”url”:”http://media4.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2015_15/966996/150407-uconn-notre-dame-mn-2100_a3ec66a9745ce3955472bbc4b1f84678.jpg”,”credit”:”Chris O’Meara”,”source”:”AP”,”alt_text”:”Image:”,”width”:2500,”height”:1827,”title”:”Image:”}}]};

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    State seeks removal of scholarship fund trustees

    Two married Napa Valley College professors left behind a ranch and money they hoped would help future collegians pay for their education. But a complaint filed by the state Attorney General’s Office claims its two caretakers have misused funds from the resulting scholarship trust.

    The petition filed in Napa County Superior Court by the office of Kamala Harris seeks to remove the trustees, Napa defense attorney Matthew C. Bishop and Marin County resident Gene Prat, as stewards of the Jean Schroeder Education Trust, claiming the two have improperly drawn from its $1.3 million in funds, spent well in excess of what the trust has donated, and diverted a Green Valley ranch held by the trust to Bishop.

    The state’s petition, filed late last year, aims to replace the two men with a receiver or interim trustee, account for the trust’s money and assets, and return the ranch to the trust’s control.

    “Although the Education Trust was established to provide financial assistance to needy students, from its inception, the Education Trust’s expenses have far exceeded its donations to needy students,” Deputy Attorney General Christopher Lamerdin said in the complaint.

    Bishop and Prat denied the state’s claims in separate court filings last year. Prat’s filing asserted the state lacks factual evidence of any wrongdoing and has no standing to replace him or Bishop as trustees, but Sonoma County Superior Court Judge Lawrence Ornell overruled Prat on March 5.

    The Sonoma court is hearing the case after Napa County judges recused themselves from the case.

    Kristin Ford, spokeswoman for the Attorney General’s Office, said Monday the department does not comment on active litigation.

    Bishop referred questions to the Vallejo-based attorney Dan Russo. A message left with Prat was not immediately returned.

    The trust was the brainchild of Arthur Taylor (Andy) Anderson, a retired NVC professor whose wife, Jean Schroeder, also taught at the college. He co-owned a ranch with her in the 1200 block of Green Valley Road.

    On July 2, 2004, a year after Schroeder’s death, Anderson established a living trust with himself and Bishop as trustees. Its terms required that the couple’s estate, upon Anderson’s death, be converted into the nonprofit Jean Schroeder Education Trust and for proceeds to assist needy students attending NVC, UC Davis or Augustana College, the private liberal-arts school in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    After Anderson died Dec. 3, 2009, Prat replaced him as a trustee, according to court documents. Court papers indicate that in April 2010, Bishop and Prat recorded two grant deeds on the Green Valley ranch — the first transferring it from the trust to Prat, the second transferring it to “Matthew Bishop, an unmarried man.”

    In exchange for the property, Bishop signed a “straight note” borrowing $1.25 million from the trust — with no down payment — at 4.5 percent interest, court papers indicate.

    The note required him to make interest-only monthly payments of $4,687.50 for its first five years, or force him to repay interest at the same 4.5 percent rate as the principal. Bishop also faced late fees for any monthly payment 10 or more days overdue, according to court papers.

    The Attorney General’s Office alleged numerous missed mortgage payments by Bishop, saying he made only one payment in all of 2011, missed three installments in 2010 and missed his first six payments in 2012. Lost revenue for the scholarship trust has reached nearly $213,000 to date, and the trust has not released its 2013 financial records, according to the state.

    Despite the shortfall, the trustees have not attempted to foreclose on the Green Valley site or collect back payments, according to the state. Harris’ office also alleged the trust gave Bishop two loans in 2011 and 2012 totaling $39,925, despite the trust stating in a state renewal fee report that it made no transactions with its trustees.

    Expenses for the education trust have exceeded its donations to students since its foundation, the state alleged. Its 2010 balance sheet showed $5,000 in charitable contributions against expenses of $97,134; for 2011, the figures were $19,500 donated out of $151,077 spent, the complaint states.

    The state petition also alleged the fees Bishop collected as a trustee have exceeded the maximums allowed by California probate law by about $170,000.

    Other expenses questioned by the attorney general included a $2,200 monthly credit to Bishop to care for two horses on the Green Valley ranch, as well as $10,231 for “board meeting expenses” that included restaurant visits at the Rutherford Grill, Ristorante La Strada and Mustards Grill – the last accounting for five entries in five weeks, totaling $836.

    In Bishop’s November filing, his attorney, Henry D. Froneberger, denied his client had a conflict of interest in the sale of Anderson’s ranch, saying Bishop did not make the purchase in his role as a trustee and that the deal produced fair market value for the trust. State law prevents the reversal of any transaction a trustee makes in good faith, he said.

    The filing also disputed the amount Bishop owed the trust for the land, or that the trust had not sought repayment.

    Bishop’s filing stated he acted largely on the guidance of the trust’s accountant Eric Lehman, who he said advised the trust and assured Bishop of his proper use of funds and good standing with the state even as Harris’ department began investigating him in 2012. (Lehman charged the trust $350 an hour and received more than $134,000 from 2010 to 2012, according to the state petition.)

    Bishop, in his reply to the state, said he moved into the Green Valley Ranch on Lehman’s advice, deciding to safeguard it after learning it had become rundown and was occupied by a drug-using caretaker. He added he was unaware the Green Valley land purchase was in peril until the Attorney General’s Office wrote him in May 2014 demanding the ranch’s return to the trust.

    “Any acts that could be conceived of as breaches of trust were taken not by Bishop, but by Lehman acting as agent for Bishop,” wrote Froneberger. “Such acts do not constitute sufficient grounds for removal” of Bishop as a trustee, he said.

    Russo, the attorney for Bishop, said Monday that he believed his client to be “close to a resolution” with the state attorney general. He also continued to blame Lehman.

    “I understand it’s very hot and big news,” he said, “but I think we’ll be able, in the end, to show this is linked to Lehman’s conduct,”

    A message left with Lehman on Monday was not immediately returned.

    In June 2014, Bishop filed a complaint against Lehman and First American Title Insurance Co., seeking damages for negligence, breach of fiduciary duty, misrepresentation and breach of insurance contract. The complaint seeks unspecified damages from Lehman, and a return of the ranch’s $1.25 million purchase price from the insurance firm if the state successfully acts against Bishop.

    Mytonomy and XAP Corporation Announce Strategic Agreement

    CHEVY CHASE, Md.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

    Mytonomy, Inc., a video micro-learning platform for college and career advising, and XAP Corporation, a leading education technology company offering comprehensive college and career planning tools, are pleased to announce a new agreement that allows XAP’s national sales force to offer Mytonomy’s student and counselor-facing toolset to its state and district level customers. First Lady Michelle Obama recently highlighted the important role that school counselors can play in helping more high school students aspire to attend and complete college through her “Reach Higher Initiative.” Yet, according to the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), the average national student to counselor ratio is 471 to 1, making the counselors’ task even more daunting.

    The XAP-Mytonomy partnership is a step towards delivering advising at scale. As counselors often struggle to keep pace with the growing demand for their time, Mytonomy and XAP believe their new strategic offering will vastly boost a counselor’s ability to provide guidance to all their students who will benefit from near-peer and expert advice delivered using Mytonomy’s video-based micro-learning technology.

    “In addition to processing millions of college applications per year, XAP’s tools have been foundational for thousands of counselors in assisting students across the country to prepare for college and career. Our partnership with Mytonomy will now offer our customers an even greater set of modern capabilities to further enhance the student/parent experience and provide counselors with extraordinary leverage so they can focus on the unique challenges facing students as they plan for the college experience,” said Peter Knepper, CEO of XAP Corporation.

    With XAP’s customer base of statewide clients, post-secondary institutions, and thousands of individual districts and schools, millions of students can benefit from Mytonomy’s existing expert and “near peer” video content that has been sourced and vetted by thousands of students and educators nationwide. Playlists can be created in seconds stringing together multiple videos creating student or group specific content at the school, district and state levels. “Mytonomy’s platform enables each school or district to create their own localized content libraries and private video communities with hands-on support from XAP, making this a win-win proposition for all involved,” said Vinay Bhargava, Chairman and Co-Founder of Mytonomy. Educators, students, and working professionals can also contribute advice on preparing for college, choosing a major and picking a career providing a new set of alumni engagement tools for those interested in sharing their wisdom.

    Analytics will also be included as part of the combined XAP/Mytonomy product offering. These valuable tools will enable counselor to track important metrics such as viewership (i.e. “Which members of our junior class watched the FAFSA playlist?”) and can help determine which videos are accessed and how messages resonate with viewers. Mytonomy video content is viewable on any mobile device and can be shared on school social media venues, or be texted out to students directly for watching on the go keeping pace with how students access content today.

    In their personal digital world, and as a growing trend in learning, students gravitate to video sites and use them to answer “how-to” questions; Mytonomy allows educators to reach students “where they are” and facilitates “near-peer mentoring” at scale. Students have praised the short form videos as helpful and effective. Counselors using Mytonomy as part of their curriculum have reported significant boosts in pre/post college knowledge tests, and general awareness of important topics. Parents appreciate student access to contemporary tools.

    “As I wrote in my recent Huffington Post op-ed, increasing school counselor time is important and the proven way to impact college access and success. Mytonomy’s digital tools can free up counselors from repetitive content delivery and build counselor capacity. They lay a solid college knowledge foundation down for students, so they know what questions to ask their parents and educators. Students can learn, build social capital, and deal with sensitive topics, through the privacy of an online video experience,” said Vinay Bhargava, Mytonomy Chairman and co-founder.

    About Mytonomy

    Mytonomy (www.mytonomy.com) is a near-peer advising platform for college and career. College students and professionals contribute video tutorials giving insights and advice on topics ranging from college admissions to career success, with a special focus on first-generation college going students and the STEM fields. The company is backed by NewSchools Venture Fund, Kapor Capital, and the Social Venture Fund at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business.

    About XAP

    XAP (www.xap.com) is an industry leader in providing students and adults with online tools to explore careers and discover, plan, and apply to colleges and universities. XAP’s products are used by thousands of K-12 institutions and colleges and universities in the United States and Canada.

    For more information about XAP’s services, please contact Matt Stevenson, Head of Sales at 424-750-3915.