CS Mott Foundation eclipses $1 billion in Flint grants

 

FLINT, MI — More than $1 billion has been dispersed in the greater Flint area by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation since it was established in the community more than 90 years ago.

A $3.2 million grant to the Crim Fitness Foundation in continued support of a community education initiative started in 2014 at Flint Community Schools’ Brownell-Holmes STEM Academy pushed the foundation over the $1 billion mark.

The initiative is described by the foundation as a “modern-day model” of the neighborhood schools idea started in 1935 by Charles Stewart Mott and local educator Frank J. Manley Jr. and provides students with nutritional support, sports, adult education, and community assistance.

“Since the day my great-grandfather created our foundation, we’ve been committed to Flint,” said Mott Foundation President Ridgway White in a news release. “It seems especially fitting that the grant that put us over the $1 billion mark locally supports something he cared about so deeply — community education.”

He stressed the importance of community education in the city as it works to recover from the water crisis, as well as the school district’s role as “vital hubs for services and places for people to connect with one another.”

“This grant to support community education is vital to helping us serve students, families and all residents of Flint,” said Bilal Tawwab, superintendent of Flint Community Schools. “This isn’t just a program that we implement. It’s our name. It’s who we are. It’s how we do school.”

The C.S. Mott Foundation celebrated its 90th anniversary in June 2016. The foundation made 420 grants for more than $120 million in 2016 alone, with the focus of grants on civil society, education, environment and the Flint area.

“From community education to afterschool programs, and from the city’s public library and arts and cultural institutions to the county parks system, we hope everyone in Flint and Genesee County benefits from the organizations, programs and projects we fund,” said William S. White, chairman and CEO of the C.S. Mott Foundation. “Flint is our home. We’ve been here for 90 years, and we’ll be here for the next 90.”

GHC Among Top 10 Colleges For Associate Degree in Business Administration

From Georgia Highlands College: Georgia Highlands College was recognized by Great Value Colleges as one of the “Top 10 Colleges for an Associate Degree in Business Administration Online.”

“Georgia Highlands College offers great tuition value and a gateway to an online bachelor’s from the University of Georgia,” said Jennifer Eisenberg, Editor of Great Value Colleges. “They go the extra mile in student services for online learners.”

Great Value Colleges looked at a pool of approximately 35 colleges across the country and selected the “Top Ten” with an “excellent value in the field of online associate degrees in business administration that can be earned 100 percent remotely.”

Colleges were ranked using a point system on the basis of tuition value (ten points possible), student-to-faculty ratio (ten points possible), flexibility in online degree track (six points possible), online student advisement (four points possible), job placement (three points possible), and curriculum relevancy (eight points possible) in the current job market.

Additional points were awarded for schools receiving recognition in the field of online education, being exceptionally military friendly, and the opportunity to receive course credit for life experience.
GHC received 26 points in Great Value College’s review, just under the highest score of 32 that was given to Thomas Edison State University.

In its description of GHC, Great Value Colleges said: GHC’s online associate in business administration has a track tailored specifically to feed into the online bachelor’s of business administration from the University of Georgia; this 60-62 credit hour program includes coursework in high demand skills… GHC offers personalized advising through email, phone or web-meeting, to accommodate the distance learner. Georgia Highlands also offers a broad spectrum of departmental exams to allow students to test their skill set and make certain they are on the right track toward their career goals.

In 2015, Great Value Colleges also ranked GHC second on a list of the 30 most affordable online RN-BSN degree programs in the nation.

GHC was also recently touted by GeriatricNursing.org for being one of the top three most affordable nursing schools in the country in an article called “30 Most Affordable Nursing Degree Programs.”
GHC will be launching two new bachelor’s degrees in healthcare management and logistics and supply chain management for fall 2017.

To see Great Value Colleges’ full report, please visit: http://www.greatvaluecolleges.net/rankings/online-associates-business-administration-degree/

To learn more about degree options at GHC, please visit: https://www.highlands.edu/areas-of-study/

Image via Shutterstock

More from Cartersville Patch


Minnesota schools say student support grants paying off – MPR News


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They visit families at home to talk about school attendance. They show first-graders how to share and teach fourth-graders to manage anxiety.

At the Fridley school district’s alternative program, the new social worker even goes to court with students who have chronic absenteeism.

“She has really been able to connect students to resources that they might not even have known they need,” said principal Amy Cochran.

Seventy-seven schools around Minnesota, including five in Fridley, hired so-called “support staff” this year with $12 million in state grants announced last November. Support staff include social workers, counselors, nurses and psychologists.

• Previously: Money for student counseling takes a back seat

Fridley previously had no social workers in the district and now has one at each of its schools. When the six-year grants run out, Fridley administrators say they hope to be able to absorb the full cost and maintain the new positions.

Overall, schools in Minnesota put less of their money toward student support than schools in any other state. Minnesota spent 2.7 percent of education money on student support in 2015, compared to 5.6 percent nationally.

The state education department estimates that last year’s grants will total about $29.3 million in support spending, adding in the matching funds districts are required to contribute.

That increase still doesn’t move Minnesota out of last place for student support spending.

But it does change the school day for students like the ones at Somerset Elementary School in Mendota Heights.

Counselor Jessalin Karsnia used to split her days between two schools in the West St. Paul-Mendota Heights-Eagan district. Now, with grant funding, she’s full-time at Somerset.

Karsnia said instead of always “trying to put out fires,” she teaches lessons on topics like sharing, friendship and anti-bullying once a week in each of Somerset’s classrooms. She’s available to meet with students any day of the week.

“To say you can only have problems on Tuesdays and Thursdays, when I was maybe at that building, is not fair for anyone,” Karsnia said.

Sen. Susan Kent, DFL-Woodbury, pushed for the grant program in 2016 and unsuccessfully proposed an expansion this year. “It’s definitely still a priority,” Kent said. “This is the best solution anybody’s come up with that people agree to.”

• Minnesota’s Graduation Gap: Without support, students left behind

Gov. Mark Dayton said in a statement when the grants were awarded that more than 100 schools applied for the money.

In southwestern Minnesota, Worthington schools superintendent John Landgaard said he’s still waiting to see the grant’s impact. He tried to hire a psychologist to split time between Worthington’s elementary, middle and high schools. No luck.

“It took us all year to get somebody hired,” Landgaard said. He just made the hire in the last month and a half of school. Shortages of school psychologists are happening across the country, according to a 2016 report from the American Association for Employment in Education.

“We’re really excited and hopeful that we’ll actually see some of those benefits we anticipated,” Landgaard said.

Clemson, BJU named best colleges in South Carolina

Clemson University and Bob Jones University are the best four-year colleges in South Carolina, according to the website Schools.com, an online resource that provides information about colleges nationwide for prospective students.

The website’s recent report, “Best Schools 2017,” ranked more than 1,600 schools across the country, and looked at affordability, flexibility, and other factors. BJU came in at No. 2 and Clemson at No. 1. out of 34 South Carolina institutions. 

Clemson was noted for its affordability. “Although its sticker price is higher than that of other schools on this list, Clemson is more affordable once financial aid is factored in,” the report said. “The university has the fifth lowest average net price for low-income students.” The estimated yearly tuition rate is $14,318 for Clemson.

The website’s survey, released earlier this month, credited Clemson for its 38 online programs and considerable flexibility. It also commended the university for retaining students and helping them advance toward graduation in six years or less.

“Students looking for online South Carolina degrees will find plenty of options at Clemson University,” the report said. “The school ranks third for the number of distance education programs it supports. Also notable is the university’s graduation rate, which is ranked second in the state.”

The report also said Clemson students graduate with lower debt levels relative to other South Carolina college graduates because of the amount of grant money available.

Clemson “ranks fifth for the amount of institutional grant aid it awards as a percentage of its tuition and fees,” the report said. “Perhaps as a result of that, Clemson comes in fourth for the low median debt carried by graduates.”

The university, which has an admission rate of 51 percent, was also listed as one of the most exclusive of the Top 10 colleges in South Carolina.

Schools.com also spotlighted BJU for its affordability. The report said BJU ranks fifth for its average net price and ranks first for the low median debt carried by graduates.

BJU is also ranked first in the state in terms of its three-year loan repayment rate. Tuition and fees cost BJU students about $14,900 a year without financial aid, according to the university’s website.

“BJU is honored to be recognized for its affordability – both in its price and in the low debt students acquire while pursuing their college degree,” BJU President Steve Pettit said in a press release.

“We work every day to deliver affordable high-quality academic programs to students from across the United States and around the world,” he added.

BJU is a regionally accredited university with more than 100 undergraduate and graduate programs in religion, education, fine arts and communication, arts and science, and business. The university has 2,700 students from nearly every state and more than 40 countries.

Schools.com also commended BJU for its student support services.

“The university offers a number of support services to help students be successful,” the report said. “There are remedial classes for those who need to brush up on core skills, academic advising and career placement for those who earn their degree.”

The Top 10 four-year colleges in South Carolina: 

Source: Schools.com “Best Schools 2017” report

  1. Clemson University
  2. Bob Jones University
  3. University of South Carolina – Columbia
  4. The Citadel
  5. Lander University
  6. North Greenville University
  7. Francis Marion University
  8. Coastal Carolina University
  9. Columbia International University
  10. University of South Carolina-Beaufort

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$70000 a day in interest — the cost of another short-term CPS budget solution

Two expensive loans that Chicago Public Schools secured over the last week will cost roughly $70,000 a day in interest for the cash-strapped district under the terms of the deals.

The district’s borrowing agreements with JPMorgan require CPS to hold $387 million in loans until at least Sept. 29. That means CPS will likely pay a minimum of roughly $7 million in interest, according to a Tribune analysis based on current interest rate forecasts and the terms of both deals.

The two loans are to be repaid with pending Illinois education grants that are delayed as state government appears to be on the brink of entering its third consecutive fiscal year without a budget while accumulating billions of dollars’ worth of past-due bills.

As of June 19, when the district completed the initial loan of $275 million, the state owed the district about $467 million in grants that weren’t paid during the just-completed school year. On Monday, the district borrowed an additional $112 million through JPMorgan, also backed with education grants.

Ball Brothers Foundation awards $500,000 to strengthen medical …

MUNCIE, Ind. — A series of grants totaling $500,000 is helping to reshape how future doctors are trained in Muncie.

Ball Brothers Foundation awarded grants for the effort to four partnering institutions: IU School of Medicine-Muncie, IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital Foundation, Ball State University, and Meridian Health Services. The grants were developed jointly as a collaboration between the various organizations under the project title “Optimus Primary.”

“Outside of Indianapolis, Muncie’s physician training program is the largest in the state of Indiana,” BBF President and COO Jud Fisher said in a release. “The Optimus Primary grants are the result of two years’ worth of conversations about how our community can reimagine medical training. By strengthening the existing four-year medical school program and the three medical residency programs, we want to make Muncie’s offerings even more attractive to aspiring doctors.

“Furthermore, we know that physicians who train in a community often stay close when they complete their medical training. Our hope is that by giving doctors a great experience while they are training in Muncie, they will choose to practice medicine in our region and state for years to come.”

Grants to each of the four institutions ranged from $100,000 to $150,000. Among the projects funded are efforts to pilot a first-of-its kind “joint-training and team-building program” that will emphasize teamwork, problem-solving, resiliency, and working collaboratively under highly stressful conditions. The program envisions bringing together physicians-in-training, hospital personnel, and emergency first responders for programming that utilizes local training sites.

“The future of healthcare relies on the full range of medical professionals — from EMTs to nurses to doctors — being able to work collaboratively in an ever-changing environment,” Jeff Bird, president of IU Health’s East Region, said in the release. “This funding will allow us to push beyond the boundaries of traditional medical education to try innovative new training approaches that help doctors gain critical skill sets.” The collaborative nature of the training also aims to build a stronger culture of teamwork within Muncie’s healthcare community.

RELATED: Ball Brothers grants to benefit Muncie Schools, Burris

Other projects supported through the “Optimus Primary” grants will offer future doctors opportunities to gain specialized training in integrated health care, mental/behavioral health, and healthy lifestyles. Funding will support opportunities for medical students, medical residents, post-doctoral fellows, and even Ball State undergraduates to receive training and provide integrated health care services, which focus on primary, behavioral, and social health services directly within the hospital and clinical settings.

“The unprecedented demand for integrated health services combined with shortages of physicians and related specialists means that primary care physicians must be working to the top of their own licenses,” Hank Milius, president and CEO of Meridian Health Services, said in the release. “Excellent quality services can be delivered at the primary care level, and providing this type of specialized training to future doctors will only improve patient outcomes. Embedding these services in primary care settings means patients can get the help they need more quickly.

“Adding these training opportunities for future doctors will help make Muncie’s program stand out as cutting edge,” Milius added.

Additional “healthy lifestyles” training components will ensure that future physicians learn to practice medicine in hospital and primary care settings with a mindset toward whole-person health. A pilot program that initially enrolled physicians-in-training in the Ball State University Clinical Exercise Physiology program will be continued through the BBF grants. Through their participation, medical students experience first-hand what it means to engage in regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. The goal is that they would then integrate these lessons into their own care of patients.

“Despite the availability of excellent access to medical care in our community, Delaware County ranks 87th in health outcomes among 92 counties in Indiana,” Lenny Kaminsky, director of BSU’s Fisher Institute of Health and Well-Being, said in the release. “We simply must do a better job of training physicians to support patients in developing healthy behaviors including good dietary habits, regular physical activity and sound mental health practices.”

Funding also will support the creation of “Healthy Lifestyle Centers” where physicians-in-training sharing clinical space with a full-range of allied health professionals such as counselors, dieticians, exercise physiologists, health educators, social workers, speech pathologists, audiologists, and others. Access to these wide-ranging healthcare supports holds promise in improving health outcomes in our community and in ensuring future doctors are well-versed in working in an inter-professional environment to deliver high-quality, integrated care to patients.

A final component of grant funding will expand beyond programming innovations to improve housing options for medical students. Housing that is located near both the medical campus and amenities in the heart of the city is attractive to medical students and will help students to experience the city in a positive way. BBF funding will enhance shared academic and residential space where students can live and learn with their medical cohorts, according to the release.

In reflecting on the significance of the Ball Brothers Foundation grants, Derron Bishop, Director of the IU School of Medicine-Muncie stated, “During the last academic year, 174 medical students and 64 medical residents spent time training in the Muncie and East Central Indiana region. Each of these individuals represents an opportunity to either return to our community as a practicing physician or to be an ambassador for our training programs and city. These innovative projects will help us to carve out a distinctive niche and make Muncie the state’s premiere training site for primary care physicians and other medical professionals.”

Bishop added, “The long-term impact of this funding means, quite simply, better trained physicians and a healthier community.”

Last year, Ball Brothers Foundation celebrated its 90th anniversary, awarding $7.25 million in grants supporting arts and culture, education, the environment, health, human services and public affairs. The Muncie-based private foundation gives priority to projects and programs that improve the quality of life in BBF’s home city, county and state.
 

Elmhurst College Ranks Among State’s Best Value Colleges: Forbes

ELMHURST, IL — Elmhurst College has placed ninth among the top 10 schools in Illinois in this year’s Forbes magazine rankings of the country’s best values in higher education, according to a release from the school. Elmhurst College also placed in the top 13 percent of colleges and universities national.

The Forbes rankings, called “America’s Best Value Colleges 2017: 300 Schools Worth The Investment,” highlight where prospective college students can get the most out of their money and whether a particular college will deliver a meaningful return on investment, according to the release.

Forbes’ 2017 Best Value College ranking selected 300 schools nationally—out of the approximately 2,360 four-year colleges and universities in the U.S.—that get you the most for your money, according to a release. To develop the list, Forbes used data collected from the U.S. Department of Education’s College Scorecard as well as PayScale, the world’s largest salary database. The rankings formula was based primarily on school quality, alumni mid-career earnings, student debt levels and on-time graduation success, as well as dropout risk rates and enrollment figures for Pell Grant recipients, according to a release.

According to the release, only 11 colleges and universities from Illinois made the list. Aside from Elmhurst, the list included the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, the University of Illinois (the Urbana-Champaign and Chicago campuses), Loyola University, Illinois Wesleyan University, DePaul University, Bradley University, Wheaton College and Illinois State University.


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Ball Brothers Foundation awards $500000 to strengthen medical education in Muncie

MUNCIE, Ind. — A series of grants totaling $500,000 is helping to reshape how future doctors are trained in Muncie.

Ball Brothers Foundation awarded grants for the effort to four partnering institutions: IU School of Medicine-Muncie, IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital Foundation, Ball State University, and Meridian Health Services. The grants were developed jointly as a collaboration between the various organizations under the project title “Optimus Primary.”

“Outside of Indianapolis, Muncie’s physician training program is the largest in the state of Indiana,” BBF President and COO Jud Fisher said in a release. “The Optimus Primary grants are the result of two years’ worth of conversations about how our community can reimagine medical training. By strengthening the existing four-year medical school program and the three medical residency programs, we want to make Muncie’s offerings even more attractive to aspiring doctors.

“Furthermore, we know that physicians who train in a community often stay close when they complete their medical training. Our hope is that by giving doctors a great experience while they are training in Muncie, they will choose to practice medicine in our region and state for years to come.”

Grants to each of the four institutions ranged from $100,000 to $150,000. Among the projects funded are efforts to pilot a first-of-its kind “joint-training and team-building program” that will emphasize teamwork, problem-solving, resiliency, and working collaboratively under highly stressful conditions. The program envisions bringing together physicians-in-training, hospital personnel, and emergency first responders for programming that utilizes local training sites.

“The future of healthcare relies on the full range of medical professionals — from EMTs to nurses to doctors — being able to work collaboratively in an ever-changing environment,” Jeff Bird, president of IU Health’s East Region, said in the release. “This funding will allow us to push beyond the boundaries of traditional medical education to try innovative new training approaches that help doctors gain critical skill sets.” The collaborative nature of the training also aims to build a stronger culture of teamwork within Muncie’s healthcare community.

RELATED: Ball Brothers grants to benefit Muncie Schools, Burris

Other projects supported through the “Optimus Primary” grants will offer future doctors opportunities to gain specialized training in integrated health care, mental/behavioral health, and healthy lifestyles. Funding will support opportunities for medical students, medical residents, post-doctoral fellows, and even Ball State undergraduates to receive training and provide integrated health care services, which focus on primary, behavioral, and social health services directly within the hospital and clinical settings.

“The unprecedented demand for integrated health services combined with shortages of physicians and related specialists means that primary care physicians must be working to the top of their own licenses,” Hank Milius, president and CEO of Meridian Health Services, said in the release. “Excellent quality services can be delivered at the primary care level, and providing this type of specialized training to future doctors will only improve patient outcomes. Embedding these services in primary care settings means patients can get the help they need more quickly.

“Adding these training opportunities for future doctors will help make Muncie’s program stand out as cutting edge,” Milius added.

Additional “healthy lifestyles” training components will ensure that future physicians learn to practice medicine in hospital and primary care settings with a mindset toward whole-person health. A pilot program that initially enrolled physicians-in-training in the Ball State University Clinical Exercise Physiology program will be continued through the BBF grants. Through their participation, medical students experience first-hand what it means to engage in regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. The goal is that they would then integrate these lessons into their own care of patients.

“Despite the availability of excellent access to medical care in our community, Delaware County ranks 87th in health outcomes among 92 counties in Indiana,” Lenny Kaminsky, director of BSU’s Fisher Institute of Health and Well-Being, said in the release. “We simply must do a better job of training physicians to support patients in developing healthy behaviors including good dietary habits, regular physical activity and sound mental health practices.”

Funding also will support the creation of “Healthy Lifestyle Centers” where physicians-in-training sharing clinical space with a full-range of allied health professionals such as counselors, dieticians, exercise physiologists, health educators, social workers, speech pathologists, audiologists, and others. Access to these wide-ranging healthcare supports holds promise in improving health outcomes in our community and in ensuring future doctors are well-versed in working in an inter-professional environment to deliver high-quality, integrated care to patients.

A final component of grant funding will expand beyond programming innovations to improve housing options for medical students. Housing that is located near both the medical campus and amenities in the heart of the city is attractive to medical students and will help students to experience the city in a positive way. BBF funding will enhance shared academic and residential space where students can live and learn with their medical cohorts, according to the release.

In reflecting on the significance of the Ball Brothers Foundation grants, Derron Bishop, Director of the IU School of Medicine-Muncie stated, “During the last academic year, 174 medical students and 64 medical residents spent time training in the Muncie and East Central Indiana region. Each of these individuals represents an opportunity to either return to our community as a practicing physician or to be an ambassador for our training programs and city. These innovative projects will help us to carve out a distinctive niche and make Muncie the state’s premiere training site for primary care physicians and other medical professionals.”

Bishop added, “The long-term impact of this funding means, quite simply, better trained physicians and a healthier community.”

Last year, Ball Brothers Foundation celebrated its 90th anniversary, awarding $7.25 million in grants supporting arts and culture, education, the environment, health, human services and public affairs. The Muncie-based private foundation gives priority to projects and programs that improve the quality of life in BBF’s home city, county and state.
 

Fairburn’s Telly Plummer includes Georgia Tech on Top 5 colleges

A 6-foot, 185 pound senior from Fairburn, Plummer cut Maryland, Pitt, Virginia Tech, Wake Forest and West Virginia from his Top 10 list released on May 20.

Nonprofits helping with broadband accessibility can seek grants from Spectrum owner Charter

Charter Communications is seeking applicants for its Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program, an initiative designed to support nonprofit organizations that educate people about the benefits of broadband internet service and how to use it to improve their lives.

The one-year grants are supported by an initial $1 million commitment from Charter Communications.

Spectrum Digital Education grants will be awarded to nonprofit organizations that have programs focused on families and seniors who have historically been underrepresented in broadband services. To be eligible for a grant, the organization must serve communities in a Spectrum market and must be a U.S. nonprofit organization with tax-exempt status.

Applications and program details are available at responsibility.spectrum.com/digitaledgrant.